Corporate finance chapter 07 principles of asset valuation

Lecture essentials of corporate finance chapter 5 discounted cash flow valuation

Lecture essentials of corporate finance   chapter 5  discounted cash flow valuation
... deposit? – – – Daily rate = 055 / 3 65 = 000 150 68493 Number of days = 3(3 65) = 10 95 FV = 15, 000 / (1.000 150 68493)10 95 = $12,718 .56 Copyright  2007 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd 55 1 ... Account:   – Daily rate = 052 5 / 3 65 = 0001438 356 2 FV = 100(1.0001438 356 2)3 65 = $1 05. 39 Second Account:   Semiannual rate = 053 9 / = 02 65 FV = 100(1.02 65) 2 = $1 05. 37 • You will have more money ... Pty Ltd 52 7 Finding the Number of Payments – Example 5. 6 • Start with the equation and remember your logs – – – – – 1000 = 20(1 – 1/1.015t) / 0 15 75 = – / 1.015t / 1.015t = 25 / 25 = 1.015t t =...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 1) pps

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 1) pps
... itself or of variability in the broad biologic context in which the drug-target interaction occurs to achieve drug effects Two important goals of the discipline of clinical pharmacology are (1) to ... beneficial and adverse effects The chain of events between administration of a drug and production of these effects in the body can be divided into two components, both of which contribute to variability ... may be effective in the treatment of human disease The first steps in the discipline were empirical descriptions of the influence of disease X on drug action Y or of individuals or families with...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 2) ppt

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 2) ppt
... from the site of administration (Fig 52) The extent of absorption may be reduced because a drug is incompletely released from its dosage form, undergoes destruction at its site of administration, ... P-glycoprotein, the product of the normal expression of the MDR1 gene P-glycoprotein is expressed on the apical aspect of the enterocyte and on the canalicular aspect of the hepatocyte (Fig 5-3); in both locations, ... of passive diffusion and active transport, mediated by specific drug uptake and efflux molecules The drug transport molecule that has been most widely studied is P-glycoprotein, the product of...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 3) docx

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 3) docx
... processes are first-order; i.e., the rate of the process depends on the amount of drug present Clinically important exceptions are discussed below (see "Principles of Dose Selection") In the simplest ... half-life As a consequence of this relationship, a plot of the logarithm of concentration vs time is a straight line (Fig 5-2A , inset) Half-life is the time required for 50% of a first-order process ... tissues, the volume of distribution can be far greater than any physiologic space For example, the volume of distribution of digoxin and tricyclic antidepressants is hundreds of liters, obviously...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 4) ppsx

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 4) ppsx
... volume of the body has been "cleared" of the drug during that time period This defines clearance as volume/time Clearance includes both drug metabolism and excretion Clinical Implications of Altered ... central volume of distribution of lidocaine is reduced Therefore, lower-thannormal loading regimens are required to achieve equivalent plasma drug concentrations and to avoid toxicity Rate of Intravenous ... 226) to prevent elimination by very rapid (t1/2 of seconds) uptake into erythrocytes and endothelial cells before the drug can reach its clinical site of action, the atrioventricular node Plasma...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 5) doc

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 5) doc
... some clinically important principles can be elucidated A drug effect often depends on the presence of underlying pathophysiology Thus, a drug may produce no action or a different spectrum of actions ... site of action, it alters the function of that molecular target, with the ultimate result of a drug effect that the patient or physician can perceive For drugs used in the urgent treatment of acute ... or accumulation of active metabolites Commonly, the clinical effect develops as a downstream consequence of the initial molecular effect the drug produces Thus, administration of a proton-pump...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 6) pdf

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 6) pdf
... toxicity is absent and the likelihood of serious toxicity is small For example, a small percentage of patients with strong seizure foci require plasma levels of phenytoin >20 g/mL to control seizures ... an understanding of the relationships between plasma concentration and anticipated effects For example, measurement of QT interval is used during treatment with sotalol or dofetilide to avoid ... onset of efficacy can be delayed for weeks or months; drugs used in the treatment of cancer and psychiatric disease are examples Sometimes a...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 7) pptx

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 7) pptx
... clearance of lidocaine is reduced by about 50% in heart failure, and therapeutic plasma levels are achieved at infusion rates of 50% or less than those usually required The volume of distribution of ... with normal liver function Therefore the size of the oral dose of such drugs should be reduced in this setting Heart Failure and Shock Under conditions of decreased tissue perfusion, the cardiac ... preserve blood flow to the heart and brain at the expense of other tissues (Chap 2 27) As a result, drugs may be distributed into a smaller volume of distribution, higher drug concentrations will be...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 8) pot

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 8) pot
... advanced at the end of the nineteenth century, and the first examples of familial clustering of unusual drug responses due to this mechanism were noted in the mid-twentieth century Clinically important ... pathways of drug disposition (Table 5-1) A distinct multimodal distribution of drug disposition (as shown in Fig 5-6) argues for a predominant effect of variants in a single gene in the metabolism of ... protein make up one group, often termed poor metabolizers (PM phenotype); many variants can produce such a loss of function, complicating the use of genotyping in clinical practice Individuals...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 9) pps

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 9) pps
... therapy and of hepatitis with isoniazid Induction of CYPs (e.g., by rifampin) also increases the risk of isoniazid-related hepatitis, likely reflecting generation of reactive metabolites of acetylhydrazine, ... Deficiency of glucose-6phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), most often in individuals of African or Mediterranean descent, increases risk of hemolytic anemia in response to primaquine and a number of other ... interact with genetic pathways of disease, to elicit or exacerbate symptoms of the underlying conditions In the porphyrias, CYP inducers are thought to increase the activity of enzymes proximal to the...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 10) doc

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 10) doc
... Indeed, one major result of understanding of the role of genetics in drug action has been improved screening of drugs during the development process to reduce the likelihood of highly variable metabolism ... applicable to the problem of identifying genomic predictors of variable drug effects Prospects for Incorporating Genetic Information into Clinical Practice The examples of associations between ... technologies improve and data sets of patients with welldocumented drug responses are accumulated, it is becoming possible to interrogate hundreds of polymorphisms in dozens of candidate genes This approach...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 11) pps

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 11) pps
... increases the risk of serious toxicity (see "The Concept of High-Risk Pharmacokinetics," above) Examples include CYP3A inhibitors increasing the risk of cyclosporine toxicity or of rhabdomyolysis ... penetration of multiple HIV protease inhibitors (with the attendant risk of facilitating viral replication in a sanctuary site) appears attributable to Pglycoprotein-mediated exclusion of the drug ... concentrations of grapefruit juice (Table 5-2) The consequences of such interactions will depend on the drug whose elimination is being inhibited; high-risk drugs are those for which alternate pathways of...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 12) doc

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 12) doc
... subsequently receive the drug therapeutically Because of the relatively small number of patients studied in clinical trials and the selected nature of these patients, rare adverse effects are generally ... spironolactone, amiloride, or triamterene The pharmacologic effects of sildenafil result from inhibition of the phosphodiesterase type isoform that inactivates cyclic GMP in the vasculature Nitroglycerin ... described in chapters dealing with specific disease entities, elsewhere in this text Adverse Reactions to Drugs The beneficial effects of drugs are coupled with the inescapable risk of untoward...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 13) docx

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 13) docx
... tissue toxicity Because of the reactive nature of these metabolites, covalent binding often occurs close to the site of production, typically the liver The most common cause of drug-induced hepatotoxicity ... necrosis produced by the ingestion of acetaminophen can be prevented or attenuated by the administration of substances such as N-acetylcysteine that reduce the binding of electrophilic metabolites ... anaphylaxis with production of IgE, which binds to mast cell membranes Contact with a drug antigen initiates a series of biochemical events in the mast cell and results in the release of mediators that...
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Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 14) potx

Chapter 005. Principles of Clinical Pharmacology (Part 14) potx
... other factors Electronic sources of adverse drug reactions can be useful However, exhaustive compilations often provide little sense of perspective in terms of frequency and seriousness, which ... considerable time to disappear Summary Modern clinical pharmacology aims to replace empiricism in the use of drugs with therapy based on in-depth understanding of factors that determine an individual's ... understanding of variability in drug actions makes the process of prescribing drugs increasingly daunting for the practitioner However, fundamental principles should guide this process:  The benefits of...
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