NEBOSH in occupational health and safety full

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Health and safety foundationsSetting policy for health and safetyOrganizating for health and safetyPromoting a positive health and safety cultureHealth and safety risk assessmentPrinciples of control in health and safetyMovement of People and vehicle RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate in Occupational Safety and Health Health and Safety Solutions RRC BUSINESS TRAINING 27-37 St George’s Road, London SW19 4DS Tel +44 (0)20 8944 3100 • Fax +44 (0)20 8944 7099 support@rrc.co.uk • www.rrc.co.uk iii THE COURSE WRITER who initially trained as a research chemist and spent years with Courtaulds, first as an R&D scientist and then as a Safety Manager During this time, he gained his NEBOSH Diploma, studying through RRC and later joined the EHS department of an electronic chemicals manufacturer as product regulatory officer He has been a regular NEBOSH Diploma examiner RRC Module No 915.1.3 iii NEBOSH | International General Certificate C O N T E N T S Element Title Health and Safety Foundations Setting Policy for Health and Safety Organising for Health and Safety Page iv Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture Health and Safety Risk Assessment Principles of Control in Health and Safety v Movement of People and Vehicles – Hazards and Control Manual and Mechanical Handling Hazards and Control Work Equipment Hazards and Control 10 Electrical Hazards and Control vi 11 Fire Hazards and Control 12 Chemical and Biological Health Hazards and Control 13 Physical and Psychological Health Hazards and Control vii 14 Construction Activities - Hazards and Control 15 Investigation, Recording and Reporting of Health and Safety Incidents 16 Monitoring, Review and Audit of Health and Safety Performance Examination and Assessment Preparation viii Element | Health and Safety Foundations NEBOSH International General Certificate Element | Health and Safety Foundations Contents Page THE MULTI-DISCIPLINARY NATURE OF HEALTH AND SAFETY 1–3 OBSTACLES TO GOOD STANDARDS OF HEALTH AND SAFETY _ 1–4 HEALTH, SAFETY, WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 1–7 ACCIDENTS AND OTHER EVENTS _ 1–7 HAZARDS AND RISKS 1–9 SIZE OF THE PROBLEM 1–11 DIRECT AND INDIRECT COSTS OF ACCIDENTS AND ILL-HEALTH _ 1–12 THE NEED TO PROVIDE A SAFE PLACE OF WORK, SAFE PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, SAFE SYSTEMS OF WORK, TRAINING AND SUPERVISION, AND COMPETENT WORKERS 1–14 THE EMPLOYER’S BASIC RESPONSIBILITIES 1–16 WORKER’S RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS _ 1–17 THE CONSEQUENCES OF NON-COMPLIANCE 1–18 ROLE OF ENFORCING AUTHORITIES AND OTHER EXTERNAL AGENCIES 1–18 THE ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS AND CONVENTIONS 1–19 EXTERNAL 1–21 INTERNAL 1–21 © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Health and Safety Foundations | Element INTRODUCTION Most people would agree that poor working conditions of any type have the potential to affect a worker’s health and safety It would also be agreed that our aim should be to eliminate or at least minimise the risk of accident or injury; and to protect workers from the effects of ill-health caused by their working conditions However, those aims are not that simple to achieve in practice Take almost any country in the world and people are still killed either at work or as a result of work activities; many more have non-fatal injuries at work or suffer from work-related ill-health The cost of workplace accidents or diseases is very high There is both a direct cost to the employer in lost working time, medical costs, repair or replacement of equipment, etc., and also a much higher indirect cost which affects the injured or sick workers and their families This element sets out a framework of health and safety by looking at the practical, moral and financial issues surrounding the goal of a safe workplace environment, and the legal and organisational framework which seeks to ensure that goal In doing so, the element is designed to meet the following aims and learning outcomes as specified by NEBOSH for this part of the syllabus for the International Certificate Overall Aims On completion of this element, you should understand: • The scope and nature of occupational health and safety • The moral, legal and economic reasons for promoting good standards of health and safety within an organisation • The role of national governments and international bodies in formulating a framework for the regulation of health and safety • The basis of a system for managing health and safety • The costs of failing to manage health and safety Specific Intended Learning Outcomes When you have worked through this element, you will be able to: • Explain briefly the moral/social, legal and economic bases for maintaining good standards of health and safety • Outline the roles and responsibilities of employers and workers • Identify sources of information on health and safety • Outline the key elements of a health and safety management system NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation PRINCIPAL FEATURES OF A SAFETY INSPECTION What is a Safety Inspection? A safety inspection is generally taken to mean a scheduled inspection of a workplace or work area by a person from within the organisation, possibly accompanied by an external specialist A safety inspection examines, for instance, working practices, levels of housekeeping, structural safety aspects, fire protection arrangements, environmental factors, the safety aspects of work equipment, potential health risks and the adequacy of welfare amenity provisions The principal objective is to identify hazards at a particular point in time Imagine, right now, that you have been asked to carry out a safety inspection of your working area Take no more than three to four minutes to list the points you would be looking for Having completed this activity, how many points did you list? Did you reach double figures? Very few people in the time available Did you consider basic points such as tripping hazards, fire risks, overloaded electrical points, poor lighting, slippery floors, dangerous staircases and defective hand tools? Look around you Answer the following questions (a) Can you see a fire appliance and a FIRE EXIT sign? (b) Are there trailing flexes to electrical equipment? (c) Is the working area heavily congested with: Stored goods Raw materials Items of equipment and furniture? (d) Is there a risk of slips, trips and falls? (e) Is there a risk of things falling on to people below? (f) Can you see any hazardous substances in cans, bottles and other containers? (g) Is the level of lighting adequate for the jobs people are doing? (h) Are people lifting things correctly? (j) Are there any unguarded machinery hazards? (k) Are people wearing/using personal protective equipment correctly? Note that many more questions could have been asked These two activities will have increased your awareness of the sort of things to be considered when carrying out a safety inspection Many people use a standard form or checklist for this exercise This © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation practice is acceptable, but the problem is that in most cases people carrying out an inspection only consider the points raised in the checklist and can miss hazards which are not listed examination of the workplace on a room-by-room or A safety inspection therefore entails a area-by-area basis, including the observation of working practices which may or may not be incorporated in a formally-written safe system of work ‘Hazard’ and ‘Risk’ One definition of the term ‘ is ‘the result of a departure from the normal situation which has the potential to cause death, injury, damage or loss’ Hazards can take many forms and will present different levels of risk ’, on the other hand, is defined as ‘the probability or likelihood of a hazard leading to personal ‘ injury and the severity of that injury’ Classification of Hazards Hazards may take many forms The main types of hazard include those associated with: Fire Machinery Electricity Environmental factors Manual handling Mechanical handling Slips, trips and falls Workplace layout Falling objects Airborne contaminants Work at heights Work below ground level Pressure systems Hazardous substances Noise and vibration Vehicle operations Structural features Unsafe practices Radiation Housekeeping Access Storage systems Workstation layouts Biological agents Personal protective equipment Hand tools Animals ‘Safe Place’ and ‘Safe Person’ Strategies Accidents at work are frequently associated with unsafe of work and unsafe on the part of people at work Detailed below are some questions you should be considering when undertaking a safety inspection of a workplace or work area (1) A strategy is aimed at reducing the objective danger in a workplace and takes into account the following factors: • Are the premises clean? Are the workplace, equipment, systems and devices maintained in an efficient state, efficient working order and in good repair? Are floors in good condition and free of obstructions? Are floor openings adequately protected against falls? NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation Is there a risk of someone falling out of a window? Are staircases safe and fitted with a handrail? Is an adequate level of lighting provided? Is the workplace too hot or too cold? • Are machines adequately guarded and fitted with appropriate safety devices? Are power sources to machinery properly connected? Can machinery and plant be cleaned safely? Are machines maintained in an efficient state, efficient working order and in good repair? Is there a formally documented planned preventive maintenance schedule for machinery? Are hand tools in a good condition, well-maintained and used correctly? • Are the various operations carried out safely? Look at, particularly: Manual handling The driving of fork lift trucks The storage of raw materials and finished products Ergonomic aspects of machine operation The use of hazardous substances • Are materials being handled safely? Are some of the materials dangerous, such as radioactive substances, chemical substances or biological agents? Are these substances correctly packaged and labelled? Is there adequate information on the safe handling of materials and substances? • Are safe systems of work established for potentially hazardous operations? Are these safe systems of work followed implicitly? Is a Permit-to-Work system used where there is a high degree of foreseeable risk? • Are access roads and internal gangways kept clear, maintained and well-lit? Are specific provisions made for ensuring safe work at heights and below ground level, e.g scaffolds, mobile access equipment, protection of excavations? Are ladders well-maintained and used correctly? © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation • Is the level of safety supervision adequate? Are line managers adequately trained in their health and safety duties? • Are competent persons, e.g for electrical maintenance work, clearly identified? Are operators adequately informed, instructed and trained in safe systems of work? Are First Aiders adequately trained? (2) We also need to consider strategies in a safety inspection These strategies are concerned with increasing people’s perception of risk In your inspection it may be appropriate to consider the following factors: • Vulnerable groups are: Young persons Pregnant women Disabled persons Are they exposed to specific risks? Do such persons need to receive some form of medical or health surveillance? Are specific provisions made for the supervision of vulnerable groups? • Is there a risk of occupational skin conditions through poor levels of personal hygiene? Are adequate welfare amenity facilities provided? Is there a prohibition on the consumption of food and drink in working and storage areas? • Does personal protective equipment (PPE) provided meet the requirements necessary for the particular hazards and risks of the workplace? Is there a formal procedure for selection and assessment of PPE? Do those workers exposed to risks wear their PPE correctly and all the time that they are exposed to risks? • Do operators behave safely during their work? Were any unsafe practices noted? NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation (a) Take a notebook and inspect your working area, making a note of all the hazards you can see within the above categories Take into account the and strategies outlined above Start at the entrance and work your way round Don’t forget to note both and working practices (b) Do any of the hazards you have identified come within the above categories? (c) Do you know what needs to be done to prevent or control exposure to the hazards you have identified? (d) Is it possible to evaluate the risks arising from these hazards on the basis of or ? , (e) List those high risk situations which need immediate attention and the action required (f) Add an indication of whether these situations can be dealt with on a or basis , Now that you have completed this exercise, which should take about 45 minutes, you are well on the way to completing a Practical Assessment Report Form © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation COMPLETING THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT FORM You are supplied with copies of the Practical Assessment Report Form prior to the inspection This form must be completed during the inspection which should take between 30 to 45 minutes (see Appendix B) The Practical Assessment Report Form incorporates four elements: • Here you are required to list any hazards, unsafe practices and good practice are adequately described A ‘hazard’ is defined as ‘something with the potential to cause harm’ Here are a few examples: It is vital that − Risk of slips, trips and falls due to the defective state of the floor finish − Risk of head and body injuries due to careless high level storage of hand tools and items of equipment − Risk of fire due to the haphazard storage of flammable wastes It is not good enough to merely describe a hazard as ‘defective floor’, ‘bad storage’ or ‘fire risk’ Similar requirements apply in the case of Here are a few examples: − Risk of injury to workers due to careless fork lift truck driving − Risk of fire due to workers smoking in designated “No Smoking” areas − Risk of falls from a height due to the dangerous pitch of a ladder should also be commented upon where appropriate • The objective of this column of the Practical Assessment Report Form is to state, in sufficient detail, the action required by management to eliminate or control hazards and unsafe working practices Short statements, such as “Fit a guard ” or “Segregate the area” are inadequate Here are a few examples: − Storage areas should be clearly marked out and gangways kept clear at all times − The adjustable guard to the circular saw should be reinstated and maintained in position during use − Workers should be trained in the correct use of ladders and supervised where such work is carried out − The level of artificial lighting in the storage area should be increased (for example, to a minimum of 200 Lux) − A planned preventive maintenance system should be installed • The second and fourth columns should indicate the priority and timescale of action required in respect of each observation A coding system is recommended, such as: H - Immediate action NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation M - Medium-term action (i.e action within the next 14-28 days) L - Long-term action (i.e action within the next 12 months) An example of a completed Practical Assessment Report Form is shown in Appendix C Criteria for Assessment In order to score well in this part of the practical assessment, you must pay considerable attention to the criteria for assessment and maximum marks awardable shown in the Assessor’s Marking Sheet under the heading OBSERVATIONS (see Appendix A) Important features of these criteria are outlined below • A workplace inspection will normally identify a range of hazards, of which some are well controlled and others need remedial action To score well in this element of the practical assessment, you must show evidence of having paid attention to both and hazards which could arise include those relating to fire, the use of electricity, structural features, will depend upon environmental features, layout and housekeeping The more the type of workplace being inspected For instance, in a workshop it is common to identify hazards associated with machinery, electrical appliances, materials, vehicle maintenance and flammable substances In an office, the more common hazards are those arising from the use of display screen equipment, electrical appliances and access equipment • Providing hazards are well-described, you should be able to score highly in this element if you identify around 15 to 20 hazards • Marks are awarded on the basis of the priority of action allocated in respect of the stated remedial action should be specified where there is risk of serious or imminent danger, or where there is a flagrant breach of legal requirements should be specified where hazards can be eliminated or controlled without the need for capital expenditure, and where there is no serious or imminent danger present situations could include those where there may be a need, for example, for the provision of information, instruction and training, the writing of a safe system of work or the introduction of health surveillance This category may also cover situations where some form of medium-term allocation of resources is necessary • Many candidates lose marks in this element of the report by failing to give sufficient information on the remedial action necessary and how urgent this action is Fundamentally, this element should provide the person undertaking the remedial action, who may not be aware of the legal and other requirements, with sufficient information to complete the action required Remedial action must be cost-effective and realistic © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation THE REPORT TO MANAGEMENT Many candidates obtain low marks in this part of the Practical Assessment because of their inability to prepare a well-structured report and also their failure to write a report which would motivate a senior manager to take action, including the allocation of resources directed at eliminating or controlling hazards What is a Report? A report is defined as a written record of activities based on authoritative sources, written by a qualified person and directed towards a predetermined group In the preparation of the report always remember that the recipient may not be aware of technical or abbreviated terms Avoid the use of technical jargon! Broadly, a report is of an impersonal nature; it states the facts or findings of the writer and, most importantly, makes recommendations for immediate and future action, indicating, in some cases, the need for financial approval It should incorporate a title indicating the location and date of the inspection, an introduction, the findings of the author, recommendations as to immediate, short-term and long-term action and a conclusion which summarises the main findings and recommendations A report should provide the recipient with sufficient information on matters which require his attention, including breaches of the relevant legal provisions, the remedial action necessary and the financial implications of implementing this remedial action Writing the Report to Management This part of the Practical Assessment is completed on lined paper in your own handwriting A maximum of 45 marks is awardable for this report, which should be approximately 500 to 750 words in length For average handwriting, this equates to two or three sides of A4 paper Remember that there is no standard format for your Report to Management Study carefully the example of a completed Report shown in Appendix D Note how all the guidance notes given above are incorporated into the report, and spend a few minutes comparing and relating the completed Practical Assessment Report Form (Appendix C) with the Report to Management in Appendix D Criteria for Assessment There are five elements in the assessment of this report (see Appendix A) • Reference to the Practical Assessment Report Form will identify those hazards rated at Priority Where possible, these hazards should be grouped under specific headings, such as fire hazards, electrical hazards and structural hazards, and reference made to the urgent action required • This section of the report should be focused around your awareness to the cost and the general implications surrounding the remedial actions you suggest following your review of the workplace You are not, however, expected to know the precise costs for a training course if this NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation is a point you are wishing to raise, but you are expected to demonstrate the magnitude of what is required , for example a few hours work-based training sufficient to resolve issues rather than a formal training course lasting several days If you suggest an item needs replacing due to damage consider whether this is the most cost effective approach, is the object old or worn? Would it be more cost-effective to fix rather than replace it? Your suggestions should allow the management team to decide on whether action should be taken In addition to the cost of the action required, an indication of priority of action (with suggested timescale, if reasonable), and suitable person(s) to carry out actions should be included Being an element of your examination, you are not able to reference books or publications as you would in your everyday working life In order to gain marks in this area of your report you must identify the international standards and conventions you have covered in this International Certificate course and relay these in your report to management • There is no standard format for this element of the Report to Management However, you should take into account the guidance notes we gave earlier Remember that the recipient may not be familiar with legal and technical terminology or abbreviated terms commonly used by health and safety practitioners • The basic question to be considered here is: “Would this report motivate a manager to take immediate action or not?” On this basis, the report must be concise, written in language that he understands and free from minor or trivial observations and recommendations The report should specify why action is required and the benefits to be derived by the implementation of the recommendations © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation APPENDIX A - PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT MARKING SHEET INTERNATIONAL GENERAL CERTIFICATE Assessor’s marking sheet THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT Candidate Number I Candidate’s Name Examination Centre _ Date of practical assessment _ / _ / Name of Assessor Maximum marks available Assessor’s marks NEBOSH moderated marks (if applicable) OBSERVATIONS Range of issues identified Number of hazards identified 20 Identification of immediate, medium and long-term actions 10 Suitability of remedial action/time scales 20 REPORT TO MANAGEMENT Selection of topics for urgent management action 10 Consideration of cost implications Identification of possible breaches of international standards Presentation of information 10 Effectiveness in convincing management to take action 15 TOTAL MARKS Outcome: SATISFACTORY (60% or more) 100 UNSATISFACTORY (less than 60%) please not write in this box Date assessed Assessor’s signature / _ / _ _ Date received by programme organiser / _ / _ Date received by NEBOSH (if applicable) / _ / _ NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation APPENDIX B - SAMPLE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT FORM INTERNATIONAL GENERAL CERTIFICATE Candidate’s observation sheet THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT Sheet Number of Candidate’s Name Candidate Number I Place inspected Date of inspection Observations List hazards, unsafe practices and good practices Priority/ risk (H, M, L) _ / _ / _ Actions to be taken (if any) List any immediate and longer-term action required Time scale (immediate, week, etc) Please use a continuation sheet if necessary © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation APPENDIX C - EXAMPLE OF A COMPLETED PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT FORM INTERNATIONAL GENERAL CERTIFICATE Candidate’s observation sheet THE PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT Sheet Number of Candidate’s Name Candidate Number I Place inspected Date of inspection Engineer’s workshop and store Observations List hazards, unsafe practices and good practices Engineer’s workshop Fire risk due to the storage of flammable substances on the bench Priority/ risk (H, M, L) _ / _ / _ Actions to be taken(if any) List any immediate or longer-term action required Time scale (immediate, week, etc) H All flammable items to be stored in a fireproof cabinet Immediate Risk of injury in case of fire due to the current obstruction of the fire exit with an oil drum H Drum to be removed and exit kept clear at all times Immediate Slipping hazards due to untreated oil spillages on the floor H The floor should be cleaned and subject to regular cleaning Immediate Health risk due to the practice of preparing beverages on a dirty bench H This practice should be prohibited Immediate Health risk due to inadequate ventilation M Mechanical ventilation capable of achieving 10 air changes per hour should be installed within 1428 days Risk of eye and face injury due to operator not wearing visor provided H Requirements relating to the wearing of visor should be enforced Immediate Risk of injury from falling items due to overloaded state of the storage racking H Storage racking should be reorganised Immediate M Further racking should be installed H Training in safe manual handling should be provided and posters depicting correct techniques displayed within 1428 days Immediate Risk of back injury due to operators not lifting heavy items correctly NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation Observations List hazards, unsafe practices and good practices Priority/ risk (H, M, L) Actions to be taken(if any) List any immediate and longer-term action required Time scale (immediate, week, etc) Risk of electrocution due to the defective and dangerous state of the flex on the electric drill H The flex should be renewed Immediate Risk of finger amputation due to the lack of a fixed guard to the metal-cutting guillotine H A fixed guard should be installed Immediate Risk of falls from a height due to the dangerous state of the wooden ladder stored in the corner of the workshop adjacent to the fire exit H The wooden ladder should be destroyed and replaced with a new ladder Immediate Risk of fire due to the storage of flammable refuse in plastic sacks H A metal container with close fitting lid and suitably marked for such storage should be provided Immediate The sanitation and washing area at the rear of the workshop is in a dirty condition H This area should be cleaned and redecorated Immediate No facilities are provided for the storage of clothing not worn during working hours, for the changing of clothing, for rest and the taking of meals L A new amenity area should be provided to meet the current legal requirements I would be pleased to advise management on the design of this area Within next 12 months The standard of housekeeping is appalling, creating numerous fire, tripping and contact hazards H The store should be cleared, superfluous items disposed of, and further racking and shelves installed Immediate Health risks due to the storage of chemical substances in unmarked mineral water bottles H The bottles and their contents should be destroyed Immediate Fire and explosion risk due to the storage of welding gas cylinders H The cylinders should be removed and stored separately in purpose-built enclosure Immediate © RRC Business Training NEBOSH International General Certificate Examination and Assessment Preparation APPENDIX D - EXAMPLE OF A COMPLETED REPORT TO MANAGEMENT An inspection of the Engineer’s Workshop and Store was carried out on Friday, 6th June 2003 with a view to assessing current safety standards and identifying any unsafe acts and conditions Generally, the standard of safety was poor and there are a number of issues which require urgent management attention as indicated below Those matters requiring urgent management attention are outlined below A number of fire hazards were present as a result of unsatisfactory working practices, including the storage of flammable substances on a workbench, the storage of flammable refuse in plastic refuse sacks and the use of the store for storage of welding gases (which should be kept in a special area) Additionally, one of the fire exits was blocked which could prevent an emergency evacuation The standard of housekeeping in the store is not satisfactory to control risks There are numerous fire, tripping and contact hazards due to the fact that the store is far too small for the range of items stored The shortage of storage racking means that many items are stacked on the floor causing tripping hazards and blocking fire escape routes The racking that is provided is overloaded and unstable Serious injury could result if the racking collapsed Several items of machinery and equipment are in a dangerous state due to the absence of guarding and inadequate maintenance The guard to the metal-cutting guillotine has been removed and a wooden ladder is in a highly dangerous state with three damaged rungs Using the equipment in this condition could result in a very serious injury Due to the lack of safety awareness by staff in this workshop, a number of unsafe practices were noted, including failure to clear oil spillages, the preparation of beverages on a dirty workbench, failure to wear full face protection whilst welding, unsafe manual handling practice and the storage of chemicals in unmarked mineral water bottles All of these practices can be associated with poor supervision and a lack of training in the appropriate safe working practices The toilet and hand washing area is in a particularly dirty state and requires urgent cleaning and redecoration It was also noted that there is no provision made for the storage and changing of clothing, for rest and taking meals NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Examination and Assessment Preparation There is clear evidence that little attention has been paid to maintaining good standards of health and safety performance in this area for some time Because of the poor standard of provision of engineering facilities, staff have had to work under difficult conditions in order to fulfil their duties There are a number of problems and failures which could result in enforcement action Vast improvements in the standard of cleanliness and housekeeping, the control of fire, chemical and equipment hazards, however, could be brought about rapidly through improved supervision and minimal expenditure On a long-term basis there is a need to consider future workshop arrangements, including the provision of more working space together with better storage and welfare arrangements The following recommendations should be implemented Whilst unsatisfactory working practices can be eliminated at no cost through improved management control, there is an urgent need to provide a separate gas cylinder storage area This might entail a high level of expenditure which has to be approved by the Managing Director These improvements should be implemented as soon as possible by the Workshop Manager and Store Supervisor The store requires completely clearing and the provision of extra racking to permit storage off the floor This could be installed at minimal cost (unused racking on the workshop floor can be taken into the store) This work can be carried out, along with the disposal of unwanted items, at the next shutdown by the maintenance staff All staff must be instructed in the importance of reporting hazards immediately An informal talk by the Workshop Manager should be held in the next week to highlight the dangers of using unguarded machinery and defective equipment It is recommend that all staff attend a one-day training course on Workshop Safety in the near future The contents of the course to be agreed with the Managing Director These recommendations can be implemented at little or no cost The toilets and washing facilities should be cleaned immediately by the contracted cleaners Quotes for the refurbishment/improvement of the welfare facilities should be obtained with a view to providing good rest, changing and washing facilities The Maintenance Manager should seek out suitable contractors and obtain quotes As this will entail capital expenditure, so it should be an item for the next Directors meeting Date 12/8/2003 © RRC Business Training Signature J S Cox NEBOSH International General Certificate ... Element Title Health and Safety Foundations Setting Policy for Health and Safety Organising for Health and Safety Page iv Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture Health and Safety Risk Assessment... Activities - Hazards and Control 15 Investigation, Recording and Reporting of Health and Safety Incidents 16 Monitoring, Review and Audit of Health and Safety Performance Examination and Assessment... and safety management system NEBOSH International General Certificate © RRC Business Training Element | Health and Safety Foundations THE NATURE AND SCOPE OF HEALTH AND SAFETY Health and safety
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