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1.Social work doesn’t require uncommon dedication to strive for social reform.2.Social workers help people function the best way they can in their environment, but they do not concern themselves in helping people dealing with their personal relationships. 3.Clients of social workers are not the people who face a lifethreatening disease or a social problem.4.The families that have serious conflicts can receive assistance from social workers.5.If you can’t find a job, you can ask social workers for their assistance.6.You are not a client of social workers in the case that your son is a drug addict.7.Social workers never participate in making policy of the government.8.There are social workers who investigate the population of the world. 9 Thanks to the social workers’ contribution, the social life is improved.10.Social workers work with not only an individual but also a large group of people.11.Social work and charity are the same concept.12.Most social workers specialize.III.Answer the following questions1.What are similarities in defining ‘social work’ between Occupational Outlook Handbook, 200809 and Wikipedia encyclopedia?2.What are differences in defining ‘social work’ between Occupational Outlook Handbook, 200809 and Wikipedia encyclopedia?3.What did social work derive from?B GRAMMARQuestions Simple present tenseMake questions for the underlined parts1 Social workers are employed in a myriad of pursuits and settings. 2 It incorporates and uses other social sciences.3 They work with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. 4 Social work has its roots in the struggle of society.5 Social workers BỘ GIÁO DỤC VÀ ĐÀO TẠO TRƯỜNG ĐẠI HỌC QUY NHƠN DƯƠNG BẠCH NHẬT – NGUYỄN THỊ XUÂN TRANG ENGLISH IN SOCIAL WORK Faculty of Psychology, Social work and Special Education Quy Nhon, 2009 CONTENTS OF THE COURSE Titles 45 pages periods LESSON 1: NATURE OF SOCIAL WORK LESSON 2: ORIGINS LESSON 3: TYPES OF SOCIAL WORK LESSON 4: WORK ENVIRONMENT - EMPLOYMENT 13 LESSON 5: TRAINING (1) 16 LESSON 6: TRAINING – QUALIFICATIONSADVANCEMENT (2) 19 LESSON 7: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS 22 LESSON 8: STANDARDS FOR PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION AND DEVELOPMENT 27 LESSON 9: TYPES OF PROFESSIONAL INTERVENTION 31 LESSON 10: CONTEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 34 FURTHER READINGS 37 BIBLIOGRAPHY 47 LESSON NATURE OF SOCIAL WORK Social work is a profession for those with a strong desire to help improve people’s lives Social workers assist people by helping them cope with issues in their everyday lives, deal with their relationships, and solve personal and family problems Some social workers help clients who face a disability or a life-threatening disease or a social problem, such as inadequate housing, unemployment, or substance abuse Social workers also assist families that have serious domestic conflicts, sometimes involving child or spousal abuse Some social workers conduct research, advocate for improved services, engage in systems design or are involved in planning or policy development Many social workers specialize in serving a particular population or working in a specific setting - Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition, Social Workers Social work is a discipline involving the application of social theory and research methods to study and improve the lives of people, groups, and societies It incorporates and uses other social sciences as a means to improve the human condition and positively change society's response to chronic problems Social work is a profession committed to the pursuit of social justice, to the enhancement of the quality of life, and to the development of the full potential of each individual, group and community in society It seeks to simultaneously address and resolve social issues at every level of society and economic status, but especially among the poor and sick Social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts They work with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) Social work has its roots in the struggle of society to deal with poverty and the resultant problems Therefore, social work is intricately linked with the idea of charity work; but must be understood as distinctly different as well The concept of charity goes back to ancient times, and the practice of providing for the poor has roots in all major world religions Today social workers are employed in a myriad of pursuits and settings Professional social workers are generally considered those who hold a professional degree in social work and often also have a license or are professionally registered Social workers have organized themselves into local, national, and international professional bodies to further the aims of the profession New words: - cope (v) : giải - chronic (adj) : kinh niên - client (n) : khách hàng - pursuit (v) : theo đuổi - inadequate (adj) : không đầy đủ - justice (n) : công - resolve (v) : giải - impact (n) : ảnh hưởng - intricately (adv) : rắc rối - myriad (n) : vô số - substance abuse (n) : lạm dụng chất gây nghiện - advocate (n) : ủng hộ - engage (v) : tham gia - incorporate (v) : bao gồm EXERCISES A COMPREHESION QUESTIONS I Match the definitions in column B with the words in column A: A B cope a at the same time assist b row at home disability c deal with clients d defend or support inadequate e the public opinion in the society substance abuse f the act of following sth domestic conflicts g give support spousal h have a deep knowledge advocate i influences 10 engage k marriage 11 specialize l not adequate 12 chronic m one who consults a legal adviser 13 social justice n participate 14 pursuit o relating to time 15 simultaneously p state of being disabled 16 impacts q using drug in a wrong way 17 incorporate r aim of obtaining sth 18 myriad s a big number 19 pursuit t work together with 20 settings u way or place sth is fixed II True (T) or False (F)? Social work doesn’t require uncommon dedication to strive for social reform Social workers help people function the best way they can in their environment, but they not concern themselves in helping people dealing with their personal relationships 3 Clients of social workers are not the people who face a life-threatening disease or a social problem The families that have serious conflicts can receive assistance from social workers If you can’t find a job, you can ask social workers for their assistance You are not a client of social workers in the case that your son is a drug addict Social workers never participate in making policy of the government There are social workers who investigate the population of the world Thanks to the social workers’ contribution, the social life is improved 10 Social workers work with not only an individual but also a large group of people 11 Social work and charity are the same concept 12 Most social workers specialize III Answer the following questions What are similarities in defining ‘social work’ between Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 and Wikipedia encyclopedia? What are differences in defining ‘social work’ between Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 and Wikipedia encyclopedia? What did social work derive from? B- GRAMMAR Questions - Simple present tense Make questions for the underlined parts 1- Social workers are employed in a myriad of pursuits and settings 2- It incorporates and uses other social sciences 3- They work with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities 4- Social work has its roots in the struggle of society 5- Social workers assist people by helping them cope with issues in their everyday lives LESSON ORIGINS -WESTERN WORLDDuring the Middle Ages, the Christian church had vast influence on European society and charity was considered to be a responsibility and a sign of one’s piety This charity was in the form of direct relief (for example, giving money, food, or other material goods to alleviate a particular need), as opposed to trying to change the root causes of poverty The practice and profession of social work has a relatively modern (19th century) and scientific origin Social work, as a profession or pursuit, originated in the 19th century The movement began primarily in the United States and England After the end of feudalism, the poor were seen as a more direct threat to the social order, and so the state formed an organized system to care for them In England, the Poor Law served this purpose This system of laws sorted the poor into different categories, such as the able bodied poor, the impotent poor, and the idle poor This system developed different responses to these different groups Social work involves ameliorating social problems such as poverty and homelessness The 19th century ushered in the Industrial Revolution There was a great leap in technological and scientific achievement, but there was also a great migration to urban areas throughout the Western world This led to many social problems, which in turn led to an increase in social activism Also with the dawn of the 19th century came a great "missionary" push from many Protestant denominations Some of these mission efforts (urban missions), attempted to resolve the problems inherent in large cities like poverty, prostitution, disease, and other afflictions In the United States workers known as "friendly visitors", stipended by church and other charitable bodies, worked through direct relief, prayer, and evangelism to alleviate these problems In Europe, chaplains or almoners were appointed to administrate the church's mission to the poor Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was a founder of the U.S Settlement House movement and is considered one of the early influences on professional social work in the United States During this time, rescue societies were initiated to find more appropriate means of self-support for women involved in prostitution Mental asylums grew to assist in taking care of the mentally ill A new philosophy of "scientific charity" emerged, which stated charity should be "secular, rational and empirical as opposed to sectarian, sentimental, and dogmatic." In the late 1880s, a new system to provide aid for social ills came in to being, which became known as the settlement movement The settlement movement focused on the causes of poverty through the "three Rs" - Research, Reform, and Residence They provided a variety of services including educational, legal, and health services These programs also advocated changes in social policy Workers in the settlement movement immersed themselves in the culture of those they were helping In America, the various approaches to social work led to a fundamental question - is social work a profession?,… Even as many schools of social work opened and formalized processes for social work began to be developed, the question lingered In 1915, at the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, Dr Abraham Flexner spoke on the topic "Is Social Work a Profession?" He contended that it was not because it lacked specialized knowledge and specific application of theoretical and intellectual knowledge to solve human and social problems This led to the professionalization of social work, concentrating on case work and the scientific method New words - affliction (n) : khổ sở - stipend (v) : thu nhập thức : nghèo đói - evangelism (n) : truyền giáo - alleviate (v) : làm dịu - chaplain (n) : cha tuyên uý - feudalism (n) : chế độ phong kiến - almoner (n) : người phát chẩn - impotent (adj) : yếu đuối - rescue (n) : cứu trợ - ameliorate (v) : cải thiện - asylum (n) : nơi an toàn - usher (v) : mở - secular (n) : tục - denomination (n) : nhóm tơn giáo - sectarian (n) : bè phái - mission (n) : nhiệm vụ - dogmatic (n) : giáo điều - charity (n) : lòng từ thiện - piety (n) : lòng mộ đạo - poverty (n) EXERCISES A COMPREHESION QUESTIONS I Match the definitions in column B with the words in column A: A piety charity alleviate poverty feudalism sorted impotent ameliorating usher B a- a system based on the relationships between the lord and those subject to him b- arrange sth in groups c- begin d- being poor e- beliefs and teachings f- causing improvement g- giving help to the needy h- help 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 leap affliction denomination stipend chaplain evangelism rescue asylum secular trace back linger i- hospital k- lessen / make easier to be endured l- name, type, classification m- not concerned with religious affairs n- obedience, faithfulness o- pay monthly salary p- person working in a church q- rapid increase r- the cause of continued pain of body or mind s- weak t- be unwilling to leave u- derive from II Answer the following questions 1- When did the Christian church have vast influence on European society? 2- When was social work seen as a profession or pursuit? 3- Why was there an increase in social activism in the 19th century? 4- What is “three Rs’? 5- What led to the professionalization of social work, concentrating on case work and the scientific method? III Complete the following summary Social work as a defined pursuit and profession began in the (1) century This (2) was in response to societal problems that resulted from the ……………… and an increased interest in applying scientific theory to various aspects of study Eventually an increasing number of educational institutions began to offer social work programs The (3) ………………’s emphasis on advocacy and case work became part of social work practice During the 20th century, the profession began to rely more on research and evidenced-based practice as it attempted to improve its professionalism IV Translate into Vietnamese: In America, the various approaches to social work led to a fundamental question – is social work a profession? This debate can be traced back to the early 20th century debate between Mary Richmond's Charity Organization Society (COS) and Jane Addams's Settlement House Movement The essence of this debate was whether the problem should be approached from COS' traditional, scientific method focused on efficiency and prevention or the Settlement House Movement's immersion into the problem, blurring the lines of practitioner and client B GRAMMAR: Questions - simple past tense  Make questions for the underlined parts 1- This charity was in the form of direct relief 2- The movement began primarily in the United States and England 3- There was a great leap in technological and scientific achievement 4- Chaplains or almoners were appointed to administrate the church's mission to the poor 5- Jane Addams was a founder of the U.S Settlement House movement LESSON TYPES OF SOCIAL WORK 3.1 Child, family, and school social workers Child, family, and school social workers provide social services and assistance to improve the social and psychological functioning of children and their families and to maximize the well-being of families and the academic functioning of children They may assist single parents, arrange adoptions, or help find foster homes for neglected, abandoned, or abused children Some specialize in services for senior citizens These social workers may run support groups for the children of aging parents; advise elderly people or family members about housing, transportation, long-term care, and other services; and coordinate and monitor these services Through employee assistance programs, social workers may help people cope with job-related pressures or with personal problems that affect the quality of their work In schools, social workers often serve as the link between students’ families and the school, working with parents, guardians, teachers, and other school officials to ensure students reach their academic and personal potential In addition, they address problems such as misbehavior, truancy, and teenage pregnancy and advise teachers on how to cope with difficult students Increasingly, school social workers teach workshops to entire classes Child, family, and school social workers may also be known as child welfare social workers, family services social workers, child protective services social workers, occupational social workers, or gerontology social workers They often work for individual and family services agencies, schools, or State or local governments 3.2 Medical and public health social workers Medical and public health social workers provide psychosocial support to people, families, or vulnerable populations so they can cope with chronic, acute, or terminal illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, or AIDS They also advise family caregivers, counsel patients, and help plan for patients’ needs after discharge from hospitals They may arrange for at-home services, such as meals-on-wheels or home care Some work on interdisciplinary teams that evaluate certain kinds of patients - geriatric or organ transplant patients, for example Medical and public health social workers may work for hospitals, nursing and personal care facilities, individual and family services agencies, or local governments 3.3 Mental health and substance abuse social workers Mental health and substance abuse social workers assess and treat individuals with mental illness or substance abuse problems, including abuse of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs Such services include individual and group therapy, outreach, crisis intervention, 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Family therapy/Family interventions Forensic social work Group therapy or other group work Immigrant and refugee services and supports International development Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender supports Management B GRAMMAR: Participial phrase Translate into English: 1- CTXH bao gồm công việc giúp đỡ người hoạn nạn 2- CTXH ngành bao gồm nhiều hoạt động khác 3- Nhân viên CTXH tham gia hoạt động liên quan ba cấp độ CTXH 4- Ngành CTXH vĩ mô loại thực hành miêu tả công việc tầm quốc gia hay quốc tế 5- Nhân viên CTXH thuê làm việc lĩnh vực thực hành cộng đồng người làm việc loại CTXH vi mô LESSON 10 CONTEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Main article: Social work knowledge building The International Federation of Social Workers states, of social work today, "social work bases its methodology on a systematic body of evidence-based knowledge derived from research and practice evaluation, including local and indigenous knowledge specific to its context It recognizes the complexity of interactions between human beings and their environment, and the capacity of people both to be affected by and to alter the multiple influences upon them including bio-psychosocial factors The social work profession draws on theories of human development and behaviour and social systems to analyze complex situations and to facilitate individual, organizational, social and cultural changes." The current state of social work professional development is characterized by two realities There is a great deal of traditional social and psychological research (both qualitative and quantitative) being carried out primarily by university-based researchers and by researchers based in institutes, foundations, or social service agencies Meanwhile, many social work practitioners continue to look to their own experience for knowledge This is a continuation of the debate that has persisted since the outset of the profession in the first decade of the twentieth century One reason for the gap between information obtained through practice, opposed to through research, is that practitioners deal with situations that are unique and idiosyncratic, while research concentrates on similarities The combining of these two types of knowledge is often imperfect A hopeful development for bridging this gap is the compilation, in many practice fields, of collections of "best practices" which attempt to distill research findings and the experience of respected practitioners into effective practice techniques Although social work has roots in the informatics revolution, an important contemporary development in the profession is overcoming suspicion of technology and taking advantage of the potential of information technology to empower clients New words: - body (n) : tổ chức - indigenous (adj) : địa - capacity (n) : khả - alter (v) : thay đổi - bio-psychosocial (adj): tâm sinh lý - foundation (n) : tổ chức - practitioner (n) : người hành nghề - persist (v) : dai dẳng - outset (v) : bắt đầu - idiosyncratic (adj) : phong cách riêng - compilation (n) : biên soạn - distill (v) : thu - revolution (n) : cách mạng - overcome (v) : khắc phục - empower (v) : trao quyền hành hợp pháp EXERCISES A COMPREHESION QUESTIONS I Give synonyms for the following words: 1- imperfect ………………………………… 2- specific ……………………………… 3- complexity ……………………………… 4- professional ……………………………… 5- similarities ……………………………… II Answer the following questions: 1- What does social work base its methodology on? 2- What are realities by which the current state of social work professional development is characterized? III Which word has the same meaning as each of the underlined words: 1- Social work bases its methodology on a systematic body of evidence-based knowledge derived from research and practice evaluation a- originated b-organized 2- It recognizes the complexity of interaction between human beings and their environment a-reciprocal behaviors b- reciprocal influence 3- The capacity of people both to be affected by and to alter the multiple influences upon them including bio-psychosocial factors a-influenced/ change b-fluent/ add 4- Social work has roots in the informatics revolution a-origin b- orange 5- One reason for the gap between information obtained through practice, opposed to through research, is that practitioners deal with situations that are unique and idiosyncratic, while research concentrates on similarities a- hole b- differences B GRAMMAR: Questions - Passive voice I Make questions for the underlined parts: 1- The social work profession draws on the theories of human development 2- There is a great deal of translation social and psychological research 3- Many social worker practitioners continue to look to their own experience for knowledge 4- The combining of these two types of knowledge is often imperfect 5- A hopeful development for bridging this gap is the compilation II Translate into English: 1- Lý thuyết phát triển người nhân viên CTXH sử dụng chuyên ngành 2- Các tình phức tạp nhân viên CTXH phân tích nhờ lý thuyết hệ thống xã hội hành vi ứng xử 3- Các kết nghiên cứu kinh nghiệm nhà thực hành có tiếng thu thập cho nhân viên CTXH sau 4- Những điểm yếu điểm mạnh công nghệ thông tin khắc phục nhờ cách mạng tin học FURTHER READINGS Ethical Principles The following broad ethical principles are based on social work’s core values of service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence These principles set forth ideals to which all social workers should aspire Value: Service Ethical Principle: Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest Social workers draw on their knowledge, values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems Social workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their professional skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service) Value: Social Justice Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity Social workers promote clients’ socially responsible self-determination Social workers seek to enhance clients’ capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs Social workers are cognizant of their dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society They seek to resolve conflicts between clients’ interests and the broader society’s interests in a socially responsible manner consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession Value: Importance of Human Relationships Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process Social workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being of individuals, families, social groups, organizations, and communities Value: Integrity Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner Social workers are continually aware of the profession’s mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards and practice in a manner consistent with them Social workers act honestly and responsibly and promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated Value: Competence Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of develop and enhance their professional expertise competence and Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession These ethical principles are part of the Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers, approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate Assembly and revised by the 1999 NASW Delegate Assembly The complete text of the Code is available on request from NASW or at www.socialworkers.org *The complete text of the NASW Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice and the NASW Standards for Continuing Professional Education is available on request from NASW or at www.socialworkers.org Adopted by the NASW Board of Directors June 28, 2002 Role of the professional social worker Main article: Role of the professional social worker Professional social workers have a strong tradition of working for social justice and of refusing to recreate unequal social structures The main tasks of professional social workers can include a variety of services such as case management (linking clients with agencies and programs that will meet their psychosocial needs), medical social work, counseling (psychotherapy), human services management, social welfare policy analysis, community organizing, advocacy, teaching (in schools of social work), and social science research Professional social workers work in a variety of settings, including: non-profit or public social service agencies, grassroots advocacy organizations, hospitals, hospices, community health agencies, schools, faith-based organizations, and even the military Some social workers work as psychotherapists, counselors, or mental health practitioners, often working in collaboration with psychiatrists, psychologists, or other medical professionals Social workers may also work independently as private practice psychotherapists in the United States and are able to bill most third party payers such as insurance companies Additionally, some social workers focus their efforts on social policy or conduct academic research into the practice or ethics of social work The emphasis has varied among these task areas by historical era and country Some of these areas have been the subject of controversy as to whether they are properly part of social work's mission A variety of settings employ social workers, including governmental departments (especially in the areas of child and family welfare, mental health, correctional services, and education departments), hospitals, non-government welfare agencies and private practice working independently as counselors, family therapists or researchers JOB OUTLOOK Employment for social workers is expected grow much faster than the average for all occupations through 2016 Job prospects are expected to be favorable, particularly for social workers who specialize in the aging population or work in rural areas Employment change Employment of social workers is expected to increase by 22 percent during the 2006-16 decade, which is much faster than the average for all occupations The growing elderly population and the aging baby boom generation will create greater demand for health and social services, resulting in rapid job growth among gerontology social workers Employment of social workers in private social service agencies also will increase However, agencies increasingly will restructure services and hire more social and human service assistants, who are paid less, instead of social workers Employment in State and local government agencies may grow somewhat in response to growing needs for public welfare, family services, and child protective services, but many of these services will be contracted out to private agencies Employment levels in public and private social services agencies may fluctuate, depending on need and government funding levels Opportunities for social workers in private practice will expand, but growth may be somewhat hindered by restrictions that managed care organizations put on mental health services The growing popularity of employee assistance programs is expected to spur demand for private practitioners, some of whom provide social work services to corporations on a contractual basis However, the popularity of employee assistance programs will fluctuate with the business cycle because businesses are not likely to offer these services during recessions Job prospects Job prospects are generally expected to be favorable Many job openings will stem from growth and the need to replace social workers who leave the occupation However, competition for social worker jobs is expected in cities, where training programs for social workers are prevalent Opportunities should be good in rural areas, which often find it difficult to attract and retain qualified staff By specialty, job prospects may be best for those social workers with a background in gerontology and substance abuse treatment Employment of child, family and school social workers is expected to grow by 19 percent, which is faster than the average for all occupations One of the major contributing factors is the rise in the elderly population Social workers, particularly family social workers, will be needed to assist in finding the best care for the aging and to support their families Furthermore, demand for school social workers will increase and lead to more jobs as efforts are expanded to respond to rising student enrollments as well as the continued emphasis on integrating disabled children into the general school population There could be competition for school social work jobs in some areas because of the limited number of openings The availability of Federal, State, and local funding will be a major factor in determining the actual job growth in schools The demand for child and family social workers may also be tied to the availability of government funding Mental health and substance abuse social workers will grow by 30 percent, which is much faster than the average, over the 2006-16 decade In particular, social workers specializing in substance abuse will experience strong demand Substance abusers are increasingly being placed into treatment programs instead of being sentenced to prison Also, growing numbers of the substance abusers sentenced to prison or probation are, increasingly being required by correctional systems to have substance abuse treatment added as a condition to their sentence or probation As this trend grows, demand will strengthen for treatment programs and social workers to assist abusers on the road to recovery Growth of medical and public health social workers is expected to be 24 percent, which is much faster than the average for all occupations Hospitals continue to limit the length of patient stays, so the demand for social workers in hospitals will grow more slowly than in other areas But hospitals are releasing patients earlier than in the past, so social worker employment in home health care services is growing However, the expanding senior population is an even larger factor Employment opportunities for social workers with backgrounds in gerontology should be good in the growing numbers of assisted-living and senior-living communities The expanding senior population also will spur demand for social workers in nursing homes, long-term care facilities, and hospices However, in these settings other types of workers are often being given tasks that were previously done by social workers Projections data from the National Employment Matrix Projected Occupational SOC Employment employmen t, 2016 title , 2006 Code Social workers Child, family, and school social workers Change, 2006Detailed 16 statistics Numbe Percen r t 211020 595,000 727,00 132,00 22 PDF zipped XLS 211021 282,000 336,00 54,000 19 PDF zipped XLS 40 Projections data from the National Employment Matrix Projected Occupational SOC Employment employmen t, 2016 title , 2006 Code Change, 2006Detailed 16 statistics Numbe Percen r t Medical and public health social workers 211022 124,000 154,000 30,00 24 PDF zipped XLS Mental health and substance abuse social workers 211023 122,000 159,000 37,00 30 PDF zipped XLS Social workers, 21all other 1029 66,000 78,000 12,00 18 PDF zipped XLS EARNINGS Median annual earnings of child, family, and school social workers were $37,480 in May 2006 The middle 50 percent earned between $29,590 and $49,060 The lowest 10 percent earned less than $24,480, and the top 10 percent earned more than $62,530 Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of child, family, and school social workers in May 2006 were: Elementary and secondary schools $48,360 Local government 43,500 State government 39,000 Individual and family services 32,680 Other residential care facilities 32,590 Median annual earnings of medical and public health social workers were $43,040 in May 2006 The middle 50 percent earned between $34,110 and $53,740 The lowest 10 percent earned less than $27,280, and the top 10 percent earned more than $64,070 Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of medical and public health social workers in May 2006 were: General medical and surgical hospitals $48,420 Home health care services 44,470 41 Local government 41,590 Nursing care facilities 38,550 Individual and family services 35,510 Median annual earnings of mental health and substance abuse social workers were $35,410 in May 2006 The middle 50 percent earned between $27,940 and $45,720 The lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,490, and the top 10 percent earned more than $57,630 Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of mental health and substance abuse social workers in May 2006 were: Local government $39,550 Psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals 39,240 Individual and family services 34,920 Residential mental retardation, substance abuse facilities mental health Outpatient mental health and substance abuse centers and 30,590 34,290 Median annual earnings of social workers, all other were $43,580 in May 2006 The middle 50 percent earned between $32,530 and $56,420 The lowest 10 percent earned less than $25,540, and the top 10 percent earned more than $68,500 Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of social workers, all other in May 2006 were: Local government $46,330 State government 45,070 Individual and family services 35,150 About 20 percent of social workers are members of a union Many belong to the union that represents workers in other occupations at their place of employment PROFESSIONAL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS (Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition ) Through direct counseling or referral to other services, social workers help people solve a range of personal problems Workers in occupations with similar duties include the clergy, counselors, probation officers and correctional treatment specialists, psychologists, and social and human services assistants 42 Audio-visual collections specialists (O*NET 25-9011.00) Prepare, plan, and operate audio-visual teaching aids for use in education May record, catalogue, and file audio-visual materials • 2006 employment: 7,300 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Decline rapidly • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor's degree Clergy (O*NET 21-2011.00) Conduct religious worship and perform other spiritual functions associated with beliefs and practices of religious faith or denomination Provide spiritual and moral guidance and assistance to members • 2006 employment: 404,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Master’s degree Dietetic technicians (O*NET 29-2051.00) Assist dieticians in the provision of food service and nutritional programs Under the supervision of dieticians, may plan and produce meals based on established guidelines, teach principles of food and nutrition, or counsel individuals • 2006 employment: 25,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Postsecondary vocational award Directors, religious activities and education (O*NET 21-2021.00) Direct and coordinate activities of a denominational group to meet religious needs of students Plan, direct, or coordinate church school programs designed to promote religious education among church membership May provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, or religious problems 43 • 2006 employment: 99,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree Farm and home management advisors (O*NET 25-9021.00) Advise, instruct, and assist individuals and families engaged in agriculture, agricultural-related processes, or home economics activities Demonstrate procedures and apply research findings to solve problems; instruct and train in product development, sales, and the utilization of machinery and equipment to promote general welfare Include county agricultural agents, feed and farm management advisors, home economists, and extension service advisors • 2006 employment: 15,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: More slowly than average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree Law clerks (O*NET 23-2092.00) Assist lawyers or judges by researching or preparing legal documents May meet with clients or assist lawyers and judges in court Excludes lawyers, and paralegal and legal assistants • 2006 employment: 37,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Little or no change • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree Mathematical technicians (O*NET 15-2091.00) Apply standardized mathematical formulas, principles, and methodology to technological problems in engineering and physical sciences in relation to specific industrial and research objectives, processes, equipment, and products • 2006 employment: 1,300 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: About as fast as average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Master’s degree 44 Merchandise displayers and window trimmers (O*NET 27-1026.00) Plan and erect commercial displays, such as those in windows and interiors of retail stores and at trade exhibitions • 2006 employment: 87,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: About as fast as average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Moderate-term onthe-job training Orthotists and prosthetists (O*NET 29-2091.00) Assist patients with disabling conditions of limbs and spine, or with partial or total absence of limb, by fitting and preparing orthopedic braces and prostheses • 2006 employment: 5,700 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: About as fast as average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree Psychiatric technicians (O*NET 29-2053.00) Care for mentally impaired or emotionally disturbed individuals, following physician instructions and hospital procedures Monitor patients’ physical and emotional well-being and report to medical staff May participate in rehabilitation and treatment programs, help with personal hygiene, and administer oral medications and hypodermic injections • 2006 employment: 62,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Decline slowly • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Postsecondary vocational award Set and exhibit designers (O*NET 27-1027.00) 45 Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles • 2006 employment: 12,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree Social science research assistants (O*NET 19-4061.00) Assist social scientists in laboratory, survey, and other social research May perform publication activities, laboratory analysis, quality control, or data management Normally these individuals work under the direct supervision of a social scientist and assist in those activities which are more routine Excludes graduate teaching assistants, who both teach and research • 2006 employment: 18,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: About as fast as average • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Associate degree Title examiners, abstractors, and searchers (O*NET 23-2093.00) Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance details for a variety of purposes May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies • 2006 employment: 69,000 • Projected 2006-16 employment change: Little or no change • Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Moderate-term onthe-job training 46 BIBLIOGRAPHY Chân dung cán xã hội hoạt động hỗ trợ xã hội trẻ thiếu chăm sóc gia đình, 2008 Child & Family Social Work, 2009 (13-10-2009) Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2008 Femmie Juffer and Wendy Tieman, Being adopted: Internationally adopted children’s interest and feelings, International Social Work 2009 52: 635-647 International Social Work 2009 52: 595-607 Jesús Palacios, Maite Román, Carmen Moreno, and Esperanza León, Family context for emotional recovery in internationally adopted children, International Social Work 2009 52: 609-620 Jini L Roby and Jim Ife, Human rights, politics and inter-country adoption: An examination of two sending countries, International Social Work 2009 52: 661-671 Jonathan Dickens Social policy approaches to inter-country adoption Kathleen Ja Sook Bergquist, Operation Babylift or Babyabduction?: Implications of the Hague Convention on the humanitarian evacuation and ‘rescue’ of International Social Work 2009 52: 621-633 children, 10 Kelley McCreery Bunkers, Victor Groza, and Daniel P Lauer, International adoption and child protection in Guatemala: A case of the tail wagging the dog, International Social Work 2009 52: 649-660 11 O*NET 15-2091.00 - O*NET 19-4061.00 - O*NET 21-2011.00 - O*NET 21-2021.00 - O*NET 23-2092.00 - O*NET 25-9011.00 - O*NET 25-9021.00 - O*NET 27-1026.00 O*NET 27-1027.00 - O*NET 29-2051.00 - O*NET 29-2053.00 - O*NET 29-2091.00 12 Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition O*NET 23-2093.00 13 Peter Selman, The rise and fall of inter-country adoption in the 21st century, International Social Work 2009 52: 575-594 14 Samantha L Wilson and Terri L Weaver, Brief Note: Follow-up of developmental attainment and behavioral adjustment for toddlers adopted internationally into the USA, International Social Work 2009 52: 679-684 15 Thomas M Crea, Brief Note: Inter-country adoptions and domestic home study practices: SAFE and the Hague Adoption Convention, International Social Work 2009 52: 673-678 16 vnsocialwork.net - www.socialwork - www.socialwork.ubc.ca www.socialworkers.org - socialworkexam.com 47 ... services, engage in systems design or are involved in planning or policy development Many social workers specialize in serving a particular population or working in a specific setting - Bureau of... health social workers c- Mental health and substance abuse social workers d- Other types of social workers 1- Social workers help children the problems in social and physical function 2- Social workers... credentials Social workers with a master’s degree in social work may be eligible for the Academy of Certified Social Workers (ACSW), the Qualified Clinical Social Worker (QCSW), or the Diplomate in Clinical
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Xem thêm: english in social work 4376, english in social work 4376, III. Answer the following questions, III. Complete the following summary, IV. Summarize the main idea of the whole reading passage:, IV. Summarize the main idea of the whole reading passage., II. Answer the following questions:, III. What are the qualifications of social workers? YES (Y), NO (N), II. Translate into English using ‘be able to’:, III. What are the types of practice?, III. Which word has the same meaning as each of the underlined words:, Directors, religious activities and education (O*NET 21-2021.00)

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