BIOLOGIA CENTRALI AMERICANA FAUNA AND FLORA, V APPENDIX ARCHAEOLOGY, GOODMAN

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BIOLOGIA CENTRALI-AMERICANA ARCH/EOLOGY APPENDIX THE ARCHAIC MAYA INSCRIPTIONS BY J T GOODMAN 1897 IXAMMAM, PRINTED BY TAYLOR AND FRANCIS RED LION COURT, FLEET STREET - PREFACE The essence of these pages is an incomplete subdivision of a purposed volume which and estimate of the native will contain, in addition, a review of the Maya codices, of the Yucatec a reconstruction civilizations, and an analysis Cakchiquel calendars together with an alignment of the dates in their records with our chronology, and considerable other matter pertaining to the subject of undiscovered America work has been the slow outgrowth of years will be necessary to unfinished state, due is its years of patient toil The appearance completion to a request of ; The and many more toilsome of this fragment now, in its Mr Alfred P Maudslay, who desires to have the chronological tables and some other matter herein contained put on record, so that he may be able to refer to them during the course of publication of his magnificent work on the archaeology of Central America The foregoing statement to afford is made less in excuse of the imperfection of this book than opportunity for doing justice to Dr Gustav Eisen of San Francisco, the absence of whose surprise to many name in conjunction with of his friends He mine on the titlepage was the first to of them, collecting most of the material I have had to to persist at the hopeless task in my attention to the Maya For twelve years he has been intimately associated with me in the study inscriptions arranged direct will be a source of work upon, and encouraging me times I grew faint-hearted and ready to give up the apparently He has completed a series of careful drawings in which the glyphs are accordance with a plan of his own, and has in preparation an elaborate monograph on the Maya will constitute civilization, and much other cognate matter an important feature of the complete volume be quite aside from the purpose of this preliminary issue we have — all of which in view, but would i PREFACE v There a history attached to the printing of this fragment is one of his the our coast, urged the importance of to visits endowment of princely building a $30,000 principally of their way of their institution own portraits Godman and Mr mental work, the It will ' notwithstanding and biographies, they could not clearly see their this little book and incorporate writings and remained for for all of its unworth, in their it, less to the esoteric I leave those have a recondite and mystic bent monu- little attention meaning supposed by many to attach branches of the subject to students whose minds To me the obvious purport of a text are sufficient the temporary significance of a glyph and I not undervalue etymologic research nor deny the possible employment of a cryptogramic style meaning of the inscriptions mural and It Osbert Salvin, of London, to invite the publication be observed by those familiar with the study that I have paid Maya the Biologia Centrali-Americana.' to the derivation of glyphs to all but, ; upon some of their alertness to the scientific necessity of assuming the cost of printing at their private expense, it and Sciences of publication its marble stairway and publishing a $5,000 volume composed to any excuse for Mr E DuCane Academy Californian of the officials Mr Mauclslay, during stelaic records, in is made my ; but, until the surface The out, I think it idle to seek for deeper ones opinion, have nothing to with their other mysteries, further than that the numerals apotheosized and become objects of veneration Maya mythology or and time periods were themselves That deities and devils played an important part in the mummeries with which the priesthood beguiled the populace the accounts of the old Spanish writers leave no doubt ; but, whatever purpose they served in religious ceremonials, they were not suffered then, into the domain of were godless A final science The Maya calendars, like all more than now, modern to intrude scientific creations, affairs glance at the printed sheets, after they have gone beyond the reach of correction, impresses having authority of such a role me with a sense that I seem at times to have spoken as one Nothing could be farther from my intention than the assumption Contemplating the important and grave nature of the subject, humility at having raised my voice at all But if I, an illiterate proletaire, chanced to speak unbonneted in the presence of the illustrious scientific world, I feel have it was not through any assurance of prerogative, but simply by right of knowledge gained v PKEFACE If in time to come, however, the scientists during years of servitude to the glyphs shall by irreverent outsiders, the themselves pushed rudely from their stools find fault will be their For quite half a century they have had own The exclusively to themselves And what kowtowing to A deal of learned and I make a They as to the gauge of the it— just as if for a solution of the It Somewhere of ignorance is Yet difference this fairly with this great problem trifling we look hopelessly manifest that to to them momentous enigma ability of learning, I retain faith in the genius have lost confidence in the if I made any it men who have been are a lot of shoe-string scientists But at which toes the sandal-string passed between, and requesting him public explanation of illustrates Museum directing his attention to a discrepancy between a photograph and drawing Washington work pompous have been preparing these pages for the press Mr Maudslay has received a letter from a distinguished Professor in the National in his were a it each other, but not a single substantial gain toward bottoming the While inscriptions has been the result could be prosecuted was it world as though sealed to the rest of the practically in their keeping, hieratic mystery material by which alone this study almost to-day, fireside, sits a by an obscure boy that never saw even the outside of a university or academy of sciences to whose penetrative mind these inscriptions before him would be — as an open book in other words, that the my It is study may become popularized The confined to an exclusive and incompetent few the first gation and comparison was the most Those who had lest The decided step in that direction it appeared greedy of some one should get the insight into the publication of Maudslay 's drawback I It work is labored under for years possession and afraid to share start before they meaning of the glyphs instead of being lack of material for purposes of investi- serious its earnest desire that they be brought it with others, themselves had been inspired with an was not Maudslay undertook the till reproduction of the inscriptions, and, with a generosity entirely exceptional in my experience with archaeologists, distributed them broadcast to the world, that I could collect data enough to make any every one interested in American He substantial progress antiquity It is to deserves the gratitude of discharge somewhat of personal obligation to him and at the same time contribute my mite my toward the succi iss of his great undertaking that have consented to let this study appear before I have had time to work out the details which are alone necessary to its completion PEEFACE vi The illustrations in these pages are by Miss Annie Hunter, Her experience and the drawing for Maudslay's series of publications render her reproductions faultless The who has done certainty with ; her whole soul best and truest result attain the Students is No mere debt they owe this admirable some of I have expressed here among the dead ; but there is essential aids to the study my who have not had an opportunity for know the Leonardo his research Landa's — the only one all No What to whom become fashionable with the He I uncover —the we incompetents but he was ; belonged to the old Herculean mold —men if He was to its bibliology he went astray at times He what Maudslay them from upon them instrumental in creating their crypts to turn to its is was delving single-handed, but he mistook the meaning of some of the treasures he exhumed searchlight who are incapable of accomplishing with a zeal that will never be equaled, in the vague of an unexplored past ever have dragged effect of advance can be made in any branch of the study but he supplied the preliminary stepping-stones archaeology work and a hundred other to speak lightly of Brasseur Michael Angelo type achieve in a dozen different lines what in a single one him It has it Landa I feel the greatest debt of all would be unknown, and without the stimulating and da Vinci whom another shade to school of dilettanti that has succeeded all will never obligation to the living, and elsewhere to his writings I should never have persevered in the grandest of them perfunctory artist Without Brasseur de Bourbourg skill in her work, aquiver with anxiety to comparing the mutilated originals with her perfect restorations full artistic all which she can trace the glyphs of a nearly obliterated inscription amounts almost to divination discharge of duty satisfies her nearly No What one else would the glare of even a misfocused If he could only live to-day in the fuller light he was chiefly ! His fevered life just- missed its triumph The shadowed discovery that should place him in absolute ascendancy never came generous hearts will not the less fore; but homage to the ardent soul that departed crownless from a scene resplendent with regal promises Alameda, California, November 1, 1895 if J X G CONTENTS -*- Page i"-™ Preface xl Explanatory Maya and Mayan System of Notation 1~9 Introduction The Yucatec System The Cakchiquel System The Codices The Archaic System 10-35 The Archaic Calendars 15-20 The Annual Calendar The Day 15 The Month 17 The Year 19 The Calendar Bound 20 The Chronological Calendar 21-27 TheChuen 22 TheAhau 23 The Katun - Tho Cycle 2;"> The Great Cycle 25 The Grand Era 26 The Burner Period and Bissextile Count 28-35 CONTENTS Viii Page Numeration and Signs for 36-87 Numbers 41-52 The Face Numerals From 1-20 53-63 Numeral Value of the Day Symbols From 1-20 64-68 Other Numeral Signs Signs for 67 Numbers from 1-20 Signs for Higber 68 Numbers 69-76 Numeral Value of the Month Symbols Signs denoting Beginning 77 Numeral Worship and the Building up of the Images and Period Symbols 78-87 Elements of the Abau Signs 80 Elements of tbe Katun Signs 81 Elements of the 52-Year Sign 82 Elements 82 of the Cycle Signs Elements of the Great Cycle Sign 83 Signs for the Grand Era 84 Numeric Features of Personages 85 Numeric Eyes 86 Numeric Ear Ornaments 87 " Miscellany Abstract Day 88-118 90 Signs 92-97 Directive Signs Signs indicating the Initial Date 93 From the Beginning of a Great Cycle 94 From the Beginning of a Cycle From the Preceding Date 94 From a Date some distance back 95 The Universal Directive Sign The Hand and Score Sign Determinative Signs 94 95 97 9S-99 Declarative Signs 100-102 Exercises in Decipherment 103-118 CONTENTS ix Page A Review of the Inscriptions The Quieigita Inscriptions The Copan 123 Inscriptions The Palenqtte The 119-149 Insceiptions Reason" foe the Peepondeeance of Dates in the (Tables) The Chronological Calendar (Tables) Perpetnal Calendar (Table) Working-Chart SIOL CENTK.-AMER ArchtEol 129 135 Ninth Probable Eea and Dueation of the Mata Civilization The Annual Calendar Crci/E 142 145 ^5- so S* *-H «o >o CO 8> rH rn >"H CO to ^H OS ®5 rn *-H •qjnom jo anra^i - s = OS •qjuotn aq; jo XtJcj co : ca » - rH CO 00 OO CO 00 O CM •qjnora jo anre^j N O a = CO CO 00 CO CO o to - - *— rH ®3 60 00 CO 0) 00 10 CO *— 00 O •qjnom jo anxEjj - M *- - CO •qiuoui aqj jo £v(j H •ni^qy fa ,(i3p - aqj jo 0J\J CO - * a Eh CO 00 Q CO 10 00 rH ; S S3 00 CO r— - O ri •qjuoui jo aorejj CO - (0 CM 00 CO 7-^ t—i ^ c (0 00 rH CO rH 00 CO — CO CO CM 00 1Q CO -H r- CO 1^ r- CM rH rn 05 * >H CO 00 CO cj a a a rH 00 CO 00 rH CO CO CO 00 rH 10 - O CO CM E E a Ph CO CO' i-H rH CO CD 00 00 a a CO * 00 CO i-H i-H CO = rH a c c3 0) c3 a a CO CO 00 H CO rH 00 CO 00 rH CO rH 00 CO 00 10 Tm O CO CM - s O CM 00 l CO CM CO cc rH CO rH GO N (0 CM CO E ' s GO CO rH 00 Tf CO 0) o J s CO CO I— i-H (0 w CO CO r— 10 - sf CO rH GO CO GO rH O (0 CM CO 00 CO CO CO rH - t~ CO CM CO st 03 ' - " a c5 •q^uom jo aure^j - r3 cc M - i - = tS5 rC £ o 00 jo £v(j 00 •rveqy jfep aq^ jo - o^j * •q^uoni aq:j CO CO GO CO i— I—* 0> 10 00 CO - o si o Pi- OJ 0? r s - •n^qy £ep £vq jo aqo; co jo -0|j CO q;uora jo ara^^j "a aqo; h- CO CM 00 CO i-H rH CO CM 00 CO 00 CO rH CO CO 00 rH CO rH CO St CO 0) in «" o CO GO rH CO rH 00 CO « N CO CM s ' - i O 03 = GO CO 1— r-i 00 rH CO ^t © m s = GO CO CO H £vq CO GO jo -ojj CO = tsi - 03 • Ph - - s CO 00 CO i-H ST" o CO I J s - a c5 M d a 0? w •q^aom CO V" r° •q^nora jo anxE^j GO 03 GO rH CO CM r GO CO rH m N I s CO 00 rH CO CM CO - rH On s O Ch CO •q^uora aq^ jo •TVBqy jfap n fc w o rH Lvq - aq^ jo 0£j CO rH CO in T- 00 CO I— O (0 00 iH CO rH 00 CM T" N r - CO CO CM - 03 rd rl - s s rH Hi o o 00 CO GO St CO P K i GO 00 CO rH GO CO r-{ CO CM « r- E = : c r3 C 03 M r^ CO •qiiuoui 9v[i jo £e(J Tveqy - jfep aq'j jo o^j 00 CO rH 00 1— N CO CM *H] ©i co Si CO 00 CO i—i i-H 00 00 rH CO rH GO 00 ^ CO 0) 10 V O CO GO * IQ CO i> CO CO CO w o CO c 03 •q^uora jo ani'BU CO Gi 1-H CO 00 rH CO 1^ CM 00 CO rH r-H CM CO -H GO CO i-H GO st CO 0) CO 03 CO to GO r-1 CO rH >-H r-i : cnsj^^^^n^^ •qjnom jo atcrefj •q'juoni aq") jo •riBqy rH t— CO | i-H a d •q^tioni S3 ri r s s- K 8 I (3 03 " - - " Ph M o 03 r3 a - 8 00 00 N CO 03 OS qq.noni eq^ £vq jo •ireqy ^*P 9lR J° °°N! 00 CO i-H T— 00 - O CO r CO 00 CM CO 00 N CO : CO CM 00 rH CO CO ^ 00 CO 00 rH CO rH OO CO 00 rH CO 0) 10 - O CO CM r-H CO rH *- rd •q^uom jo -4-3 anre^i; o ; - 8 - Ph S3 S3 O 8 Ph 0? 00 TO rH 00 ojy[ CO CM •q^uoro jo aurefj o3 ; •q^uoni aq^ jo £v(j ireqy Xup aq^ jo - OO CO 00 CO I— »-H CO « CO 0) 10 -G I ; CO 00 CO i-H i-H 00 CO - O CO CM j 8 a CD o in •iiEqy i/ep aq| jo -ojj CO 00 CO i— 10 - o 00 CO i-H i-H (0 CM 00 T" CO N CO T- r- CO s CO IS M 00 rH CO rH 00 CO CM GO CO * 00 CO CO rH 00 0) 10 00 CO rH 00 CO CO i-H CM CO H l-H CO O CO i-H - N io to rn o d CJ q}uouc jo anrsfj * ^ &» *"H o = to >T5 - CO i> a «3 OS K = d SO *1 a •-H a Ph O a a c? Ph a q^uom 00 abq aqj jo •nBqy A"Ep aq^ jo -o^j; N CO CO 00 CO r-H I— (M CO CO CO * CO 00 CO I— i-H 0) 10 CO CO O »" C6 *1 t>5 H i-H 00 ^H CO (0 CM CO 00 i-H N a o CO CO i-H r-H CO CM oo CO CO 00 r-H * CO CO 0) IT" s •q^uotn jo auiB^j co = to a s 'o a a a a "a ; a 00 CO CO CO 00 CO 00 i— CO i-H i-H i-H 00 ^ 10 - O a CU = C3 00 •t[!jnora ax[% •nBqy ABp jo a"bq aqcj q^uom jo -o^j jo aorefj 00 00 CO CO rH I— 0) a co CO 00 m - o CO CM CO CO 1—1 i-H *- N 00 CO CM CO abq •QBqy ABp aq^ jo -ojij GO » = CO iH 00 1— CO CO CM CO - I 00 CO « N 0) « CO CO r-H i-H CM *- d c5 = a = a : a a co a a a CO !>H 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO CO I— CO 00 1— CO i-H i— r-H i-H CO 0) N CO CM CO * CO ; s a 00 CO 1— 00 CO i-H i 0) 10 j s a 00 CO M •q^uotn aqj jo CO CO i-H - 10 o co CM a a •q^uora jo aore^j d P< o s - 'a s s a Ph c? a j a CO O ca a co CO r-H i-H - O CO CM a Ph SO •q^uoin aq^ jo ABQ; M i M »3 A"Bp aq} jo •ojj a CJ CO f— : - CO iH 00 a ^ a 00 CO 1- CO = CO CM CO rH CO i-H OO * CO 00 CO l-H 1-1 0) 10 X CO «" O a CO CO CO oo r-H r-H 05 10 «" : a CO CO CO h- CO CM O o a 0) N s a a CO -H CO CO 0) CO 10 a tsa 00 CO r-l r-H - o CO CO co l-H CD CM r- e M a a s 00 CO r J S a CO -H CO CO CM at = a CO CO co CO r-H r-H CO CJ) 10 - tsi CO a a OS Eh a £vq •q^uoua aq^ jo ; a o ci •q^uora jo araB^i "t ^_ - CO a Ph r-H -top aq^ jo *ojj Ph * CO h- CO iH CO CO CM "' CO co CO >-H CO K * •q^uom aq^ jo £vq H n«qy £ep aq^ jo i— -oj»j CO rH CO i-H O CO CM 00 CO GO CO CO CO t— T- CO CO i-H i-H CO CO CO t-H r- CO CM 00 o GO CO CO CO t-H i-H 1- CO CM CO n i = 00 CO CO 1— i-H CO CM : 00 i> ce >H •q'jnocti •TVEqy aq; jo i^(j 00 CO r-H i-H Xep aq^ jo o^j - •q^uoui jo aurefj CO N *- CM = CO 1 >"-l ; CO SO so *4 CO CO i-H 1— o CD CM cS = CO CO 00 OS = CO CO CO CO -H CO - N CO CM s 8 CO CO CO CO i-H i-H CO 0) 10 V o ; i-H •3 "a r = J ea Ph S! OJ o CO CO Ph M 1=) ce 00 •qcjnocn •ii'eqy aq^ jo feg ^Bp 9I{1 JO "O^J CO CO •q^uom jo araE^j •q^noni aqj jo £v(± •riEqy £ep aq; jo 'o^j CO CO CO iH CO i-H 0) 10 ^ O CD o o 8 O r-t * CO ; H CO CO i-H ^H O - N •q^uoni jo aniB^j; CO 00 CO CM 8 CO CO i-H T— CM *- r- s ; CO CO CO Ph CO CO T-t i-H CM CO ^ CO CO ^ - dt s o Ph 1— CO CO ce CO CO CM CO s 00 CO r—i r-H CO ^ - CO CO CO CO CO i-H CO r 00 0) 10 I ^- a o CO CO CO i-H i— CM - N CO CO CO i-H CM CO "3 s K E M CO CO 00 cd >H S3 »"H •q^aoni aq^ jo £"eQ •n^qy i!-Bp aqq jo -ojj CO CO 00 t— CM ^ CO CO CO i-H i-H CO 0) CO CO CO CO CO i-H - O 10 CO CM I- r-i o •q^aotn jo anxe£[ 8 : I 13 r o •nuqy Ii3p aq^ jo -oj^; CO CO CO 1— - P3 CD CO CO 1— i-H O CD CM V »"H Si eo d CO CO CO i-H r*- CO CO CM CO CO CO rH CO CO N CO CM CO « ~* IQ 50 ^ CO o> 8 O CO CO a J CO CO CO i-H i-H CO 0) 10 * O Si so qq.noiu jo anre^j — N £vq 00 CO •nraqy i/ep aq; jo -0^ CO 1= H •q^notn aq; jo Ph CM CO ^H CO l-H CO * CO 8 CO i-H H Si q;uoui aq; jo - CO CO i-H I-H (0 CM CO CO I— i-H CO ^ CO 1- CO !>- T— a •q;uom jo anrej^ | : a O o H CM »1 CO CO -qjuoui aq; jo iCbq 00 •ivcqy iup aq; jo -or 0) 10 Q E-i SI £eq OS CO CO i-H r— •liBqy ifupaqt jo 'O^j *— *— N CO CO ©1 H •q;uora aq; jo CO CO CO r-H •q;uoui jo aarefi 8 8 T- -'- o CO CM "- CD s CO CO •* CM co CO r-t •-H - r- s CO CO CO CO CO CM 8 00 CO CO CO 0) CO •-H ^H 10 T— CO CO ^H i-H CO co l-H O G 8 Ph CO 1—1 ^H JS Ceh Yaxkin Kankin 12 13 11 11 13 10 in 1 10 - '.' 17 Muan 10 G 11 10 12 Kayab Uo s '.1 13 li 11 s Pax Zac 12 10 G 12 18 18 18 18 '.1 11 111 10 13 1 13 Zotz 11 s 10 6 12 12 '.1 10 11 :i G 13 Mac 111 12 IS 14 Cumhu II Tzec it 12 10 8 Yax 12 10 :> li 12 V 10 12 13 11 S 11 Milan 13 s Pax Zac Xul Pop 13 Kankin 13 Chen :i 11 Zip 12 10 13 11 12 li 10 2 13 11 Mol 10 12 Kayab Cumhu Mac 13 11 11 13 10 6 13 1:: Hi 12 Zip Mac Mol 12 11 S Zip 12 10 8 13 11 13 Pax 13 Zac 13 Xul 13 Pop IS Kankin 18 Chen 18 Zotz 13 Cumhu S Mac Mol J 10 13 12 10 3 Muan Yax Tzec 12 11 13 11 7 4 :i 13 11 Hi 13 '1 6 1 7 10 12 10 13 11 :i 8 13 13 13 13 18 18 18 IS 12 10 11 n Yiixkin Uo 12 4 11 13 11 13 11 12 13 11 11 :i 4 3 Kankin Tzec 12 10 1:1 13 (J 13 Zotz 8 12 In 13 11 11 18 Zip Mac 12 10 13 Ceh 11 13 12 s 11 S 13 14 15 10 17 IS 19 10 12 10 in 7 G 12 Uo.' 18 Zac Zip! 13 11 13 11 Uaycb Yax 13 Pop :: Hi 4 ii 5' 13 12 Cumhu Ceh HI Yas Tzec 1; 12 12' 13 11 13 Chen 10 13 11 12 10 1 20 13 13 18 18 18 IS 12 6 M 11 12 10 6 ii s 12 l"; r, 13 11 9 10 ii 13 11 Cell Uo in Zac 11 12 12 13 11 10 j Chen 7 13 Mol Cumhu •) 10 13 11 12 10 1:1 Kavab 11 JS 11 Yas Pop Yas Uo Pas Yaskin 12 Cumhu Y'axkin 11 11 12 10 12 10 13 -1 13 9 11 12 10 13 11 Pax Y'axkin 13 12 11 10 g 7> Kankin Zotz 18 18 13 18 13 18 13 18 13 12 10 Mac :> 10 10 3 S s 7 11 2 4 13 12 10 13 12 11 10 3 4 11 12 11 ) 12 12 11 10 12 1i 13 13 1 10 13 18 13 18 13 18 13 13 11 1'J 12 11 10 8 x 4 10 S 11 Uo Zotz 13 18 Ceh 13 2 10 11 11 10 11 5 13 12 12 6 10 7 13 12 11 J 12 1 13 12 11 10 13 i 13 12 132 11 ! 20 Zac Ceh Zip 13 - Yas Pop 13 18 13 H 10 e 13 12 11 10 12 ' 11 10 10 10 13 11 12 13 E 11 13 12 16 10 8 13 12 13 /, Tzec j 11 ' 1" 10 12 £ 11 13 13 11 13 13 12 S o 11 13 11 12 e 11 lfl 10 11 11 10 12 13 12 n ~> 13 12 ; 13 10 8 11 11 11 13 12 11 10 IS /.' 10 13 12 10 13 12 16 10 13 12 11 10 11 3 12 12 11 10 7 3 Uajeb 18 Kankin 13 13 Tzec Pop 13 Uo 13 Pas Ceh Mol 18 Zip 18 Kavab 13 Mac Chen 11 Muan 13 13 12 11 10 13 12 16 10 Kankin 18 Chen 11 10 Kayab Cumhu 10 6 S Zip 18 Ceb 13 Mol Zotz J 11 S 11 | 11 10 6 S 10 Yaskin 12 73 18 Yaskin 13 Zip 13 Kavab Mac Chen 18 Zotz 18 Cumhu 13 Kankin Yus Xul 18 Pop 18 Muan u Chen 13 12 1, Mac Cen | Cumhu 18 Yas 13 Xul Uo Pas 1,0 57 Tzec Pop Muan 4 46 47 iS 49 59 Milan Cell 18 13 Ifi Pop Mol Zotz 32 S3 Si 35 35 37 SS 39 44 18 Pax 31 «J Yaskin 18 Uo 13 11 13 12 11 10 16 J 6 13 12 11 10 8 4 4 4 10 S 12 IS 4 20 27 28 29 SO Zac 13 12 11 10 1 Tzec Yas 18 13 13 U Zac, \ 4 ( 10 11 Ahau Month j i Ahau Month Month f; AHAUS 12 „ „ „ 18 Kayab 13 „ „ „ 18 Pax 13 „ „ „ 18 Muan 13 „ „ IS Kankin 13 „ „ „ 18 Mac 13 „ „ 18 Ceh 13 „ „ 18 Zac 13 „ „ , 18 Yax WORKING-CHART This chart will be found invaluable in working out chronological problems obviate a discouraging such problems is amount of It will figuring, for nearly every factor that can enter into A here ready reckoned in days single example will sufficiently illustrate its use On the tablet of the Temple of the Sun, Palenque, followed almost immediately by nizable), and that, Ahau-8 (the is this record: month symbol is — 12 —18 —5 X 16 new and unrecog- questions naturally arise —what is the unknown month sign ? and these katuns, ahaus, chuens, and days represent the period between these dates the sixteenth day from Ahau gives probability to the conjecture thereby testing the utility of our working-chart period to days, thus Two with but a single intervening glyph, by Cib-14 Mol By its help % cycles, Cib being Let us cipher we it out, readily reduce the : cycles =1,296,000 days 12 katuns = 18 ahaus chuens 16 days = = = 86,4,00 „ 6,480 „ 100 ,, 16 „ 1,388,996 days many calendar rounds as possible, being seventy-three, or From these we take 155, the number of days from the 1,385,540 days, leaving 3,456 beginning of the year to 14 Mol that being the only date we are certain of This From these deduct all the years possil ;le, being nine, or 3,2S5 days leaves 3,301 days There are now but 16 days left Reckoning back from t e end of the year, we find a circumstance that enables us < sily to recognize the strange these reach to Cumhu Turning now to the Annual Calendar, sign as a variant of the symbol for that month we find that Ahau-8 Cumhu occurs on page 7, and, passing over nine years till we come to page 17, we find that Cib falls on the 14th of Mol in that year Thus we are satisfied that the strange month sign is a symbol for Cumhu, and that the cyi From these we deduct as — — li katuns, ahaus, chuens, and days represent the period between the two dates reading being: " great cycle, to — — — 5x16, 12 Cib-14 18 Mol"; — the lull from Ahau-8 Cumhu, the beginning of the and, by the help of the working-table, accomplished our purpose with a comparatively small amount of ciphering we have WORKING-CHART.— PERIODS REDUCED TO DAYS MONTH DATES OF THE CALENDAR ROUNDS CH UENS 18,980 41 778,180 20 7,200 37,960 42 797,160 40 14,400 56,940 43 816,140 60 835,120 80 21,600 28,800 75,920 94,900 45 854,100 100 36,000 113,880 46 873 080 120 43 200 132,860 47 892,060 140 50,400 151,840 48 911,040 160 57,600 170,820 49 930,020 180 g 64,800 10 189,800 50 949,000 10 200 10 72,000 44 DAYS KATUNS 20 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Ik Akbal Kan Chicchan Cimi Manik Lam at Muluc Oc Chuen Eb Ben Ix Men Cib Caban Ezenab Cauac Ahan Ymis ORDER OF THE MONTHS c o g< IS 17 16 N s 14 13 10 11 12 13 14 15 A A § o j a Đ % ô d P a a g 12 11 10 7 a 11 208,780 51 967,980 11 220 11 79,200 12 227,760 52 986,960 12 240 12 86,400 13 246,740 53 1,005,940 13 260 13 93,600 u 265,720 54 1,024,920 14 280 14 100,800 15 284,700 55 1,043,900 15 300 15 108,000 365 27 9,855 16 303,680 56 1,062,880 16 320 16 115,200 730 28 10,220 17 322,660 57 1,081,860 17 340 17 122,400 1,095 29 10,585 IS 341,640 58 1,100,840 18 360 18 129,600 1,460 30 10,950 19 360,620 59 1,119,820 19 136,800 1,825 31 11,315 20 144,000 2,190 32 11,680 15 YEARS A HAUS 16 20 379,600 60 1,138,800 21 398,580 61 1,157,780 360 2,555 33 12,045 22 417,560 62 1,176,760 720 2,920 34 12,410 23 436,540 63 1,195,740 1,080 3,285 35 12,775 24 455,520 64 1,214,720 1,440 10 3,650 36 13,140 25 474,500 65 1,233,700 1,800 11 4,015 37 13,505 26 493,480 66 1,252,680 2,160 12 4,380 38 13,870 27 512,460 67 1,271,660 2,520 13 4,745 39 14,235 28 531,440 68 1,290,640 2,880 144,000 14 5,110 40 14,600 29 550,420 69 1,309,620 3,240 288,000 15 5,475 41 14,965 30 569,400 70 1,328,600 10 3,600 432,000 16 5,840 4® 15,330 31 588,380 71 1,347,580 11 3,960 576,000 17 6,205 43 15,695 32 607,360 72 1,366,560 12 4,320 720,000 IS 6,570 44 16,060 33 626,340 73 1,385,540 13 4,680 864,000 19 6,935 45 16,425 Sit 645,320 74 1,404,520 U 5,040 1,008,000 20 7,300 46 16,790 35 664,300 75 1,423,500 15 5,400 S 1,152,000 21 7,665 47 17,155 36 683,280 76 1,442,480 16 5,760 1,296,000 22 8,030 48 17,520 37 702,260 77 1,461,460 17 6,120 10 1,440,000 23 8,395 49 17,SS5 38 721,240 78 1,480,440 IS 6,480 11 1,584,000 24 8,760 50 18,250 39 740,220 79 1,499,420 19 6,840 12 1,728,000 25 9,125 51 18,615 40 759,200 80 1,518,400 20 7,200 13 1,872,000 26 9,490 52 18,980 C YCLES 17 18 ... never obligation to the living, and elsewhere to his writings I should never have persevered in the grandest of them perfunctory artist Without Brasseur de Bourbourg skill in her work, aquiver... have nothing to with their other mysteries, further than that the numerals apotheosized and become objects of veneration Maya mythology or and time periods were themselves That deities and devils... back 95 The Universal Directive Sign The Hand and Score Sign Determinative Signs 94 95 97 9S-99 Declarative Signs 100-102 Exercises in Decipherment 103-118 CONTENTS ix Page A Review of the Inscriptions
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