Gertrude chandler warner the boxcar children mysteries lve (v5 0)

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The Boxcar Children Mysteries Box Set Books One Through Twelve Gertrude Chandler Warner Albert Whitman & Company Chicago, Illinois CONTENTS The Boxcar Children (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book One) Surprise Island (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Two) The Yellow House Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Three) Mystery Ranch (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Four) Mike’s Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Five) Blue Bay Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Six) The Woodshed Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Seven) The Lighthouse Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Eight) Mountain Top Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Nine) Schoolhouse Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Ten) Caboose Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Eleven) Houseboat Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Twelve) A Biography of Gertrude Chandler Warner The Boxcar Children GERTRUDE CHANDLER WARNER Illustrated by L Kate Deal ALBERT WHITMAN & Company, Chicago, Illinois Contents CHAPTER I THE FOUR HUNGRY CHILDREN II NIGHT IS TURNED INTO DAY III A NEW HOME IN THE WOODS IV HENRY HAS TWO SURPRISES V THE EXPLORERS FIND TREASURE VI A QUEER NOISE IN THE NIGHT VII A BIG MEAL FROM LITTLE ONIONS VIII A SWIMMING POOL AT LAST IX FUN IN THE CHERRY ORCHARD X HENRY AND THE FREE-FOR-ALL XI THE DOCTOR TAKES A HAND XII JAMES HENRY AND HENRY JAMES XIII A NEW HOME FOR THE BOXCAR ABOUT THE AUTHOR I—The Four Hungry Children O NE WARM NIGHT four children stood in front of a bakery No one knew them No one knew where they had come from The baker’s wife saw them first, as they stood looking in at the window of her store The little boy was looking at the cakes, the big boy was looking at the loaves of bread, and the two girls were looking at the cookies Now the baker’s wife did not like children She did not like boys at all So she came to the front of the bakery and listened, looking very cross “The cake is good, Jessie,” the little boy said He was about five years old “Yes, Benny,” said the big girl “But bread is better for you Isn’t it, Henry?” “Oh, yes,” said Henry “We must have some bread, and cake is not good for Benny and Violet.” “I like bread best, anyway,” said Violet She was about ten years old, and she had pretty brown hair and brown eyes “That is just like you, Violet,” said Henry, smiling at her “Let’s go into the bakery Maybe they will let us stay here for the night.” The baker’s wife looked at them as they came in “I want three loaves of bread, please,” said Jessie She smiled politely at the woman, but the woman did not smile She looked at Henry as he put his hand in his pocket for the money She looked cross, but she sold him the bread Jessie was looking around, too, and she saw a long red bench under each window of the bakery The benches had flat red pillows on them “Will you let us stay here for the night?” Jessie asked “We could sleep on those benches, and tomorrow we would help you wash the dishes and things for you.” Now the woman liked this She did not like to wash dishes very well She would like to have a big boy to help her with her work “Where are your father and mother?” she asked “They are dead,” said Henry “We have a grandfather in Greenfield, but we don’t like him,” said Benny Jessie put her hand over the little boy’s mouth before he could say more “Oh, Benny, keep still!” she said “Why don’t you like your grandfather?” asked the woman “He is our father’s father, and he didn’t like our mother,” said Henry “So we don’t think he would like us We are afraid he would be mean to us.” “Did you ever see him?” asked the woman “No,” answered Henry “Then why you think he would be mean to you?” asked the woman “Well, he never came to see us,” said Henry “He doesn’t like us at all.” “Where did you live before you came here?” asked the woman But not one of the four children would tell her “We’ll get along all right,” said Jessie “We want to stay here for only one night.” “You may stay here tonight,” said the woman at last “And tomorrow we’ll see what we can do.” Henry thanked her politely “We are all pretty tired and hungry,” he said The children sat down on the floor Henry cut one of the loaves of bread into four pieces with his knife, and the children began to eat “Delicious!” said Henry “Well, I never!” said the woman She went into the next room and shut the door “I’m glad she is gone,” remarked Benny, eating “She doesn’t like us.” “Sh, Benny!” said Jessie “She is good to let us sleep here.” After supper the children lay down on their red benches, and Violet and Benny soon went to sleep But Jessie and Henry could hear the woman talking to the baker She said, “I’ll keep the three older children They can help me But the little boy must go to the Children’s Home He is too little I cannot take care of him.” The baker answered, “Very well Tomorrow I’ll take the little boy to the Children’s Home We’ll keep the others for awhile, but we must make them tell us who their grandfather is.” Jessie and Henry waited until the baker and his wife had gone to bed Then they sat up in the dark “Oh, Henry!” whispered Jessie “Let’s run away from here!” “Yes, indeed,” said Henry “We’ll never let Benny go to a Children’s Home Never, never! We must be far away by morning, or they will find us But we must not leave any of our things here.” Jessie sat still, thinking “Our clothes and a cake of soap and towels are in the big laundry bag,” she said “Violet has her little workbag And we have two loaves of bread left Have you your knife and the money?” “Yes,” said Henry “I have almost four dollars.” “You must carry Benny,” said Jessie “He will cry if we wake him up But I’ll wake Violet “Sh, Violet! Come! We are going to run away again If we don’t run away, the baker will take Benny to a Children’s Home in the morning.” The little girl woke up at once She sat up and rolled off the bench She did not make any noise “What shall I do?” she whispered softly “Carry this,” said Jessie She gave her the workbag Jessie put the two loaves of bread into the laundry bag, and then she looked around the room “All right,” she said to Henry “Take Benny now.” Henry took Benny in his arms and carried him to the door of the bakery Jessie took the laundry bag and opened the door very softly All the children went out quietly They did not say a word Jessie shut the door, and then they all listened Everything was very quiet So the four children went down the street THE RADIO MYSTERY THE MYSTERY OF THE RUNAWAY GHOST THE FINDERS KEEPERS MYSTERY THE MYSTERY OF THE HAUNTED BOXCAR THE CLUE IN THE CORN MAZE THE GHOST OF THE CHATTERING BONES THE SWORD OF THE SILVER KNIGHT THE GAME STORE MYSTERY THE MYSTERY OF THE ORPHAN TRAIN THE VANISHING PASSENGER THE GIANT YO-YO MYSTERY THE CREATURE IN OGOPOGO LAKE THE ROCK ’N’ ROLL MYSTERY THE SECRET OF THE MASK THE SEATTLE PUZZLE THE GHOST IN THE FIRST ROW THE BOX THAT WATCH FOUND A HORSE NAMED DRAGON THE GREAT DETECTIVE RACE THE GHOST AT THE DRIVE-IN MOVIE THE MYSTERY OF THE TRAVELING TOMATOES All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the non-exclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this ebook onscreen No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, downloaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage and retrieval system, in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of the publisher This is a work of fiction Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental copyright © 1967 by Albert Whitman & Company ISBN: 978-1-4532-0803-8 This 2010 edition distributed by Open Road Integrated Media 180 Varick Street New York, NY 10014 www.openroadmedia.com Illustrated Biography Gertrude Chandler Warner (1890—1979) was an American author of children’s books, most notably the first nineteen titles of the Boxcar Children mystery series, as well as four books for adults Born on April 16, 1890, Warner was raised in Putnam, Connecticut, in a house built by her grandfather, John Carpenter, at 42 South Main Street, across the street from a railroad station Her sister, Frances, was two years older than her, and her brother, John, was two years younger Their parents, Edgar Warner and Jane Elizabeth Carpenter Warner, were extremely active within the Putnam community as a lawyer/judge and head of the town school committee, respectively Although she was afflicted with severe sore throats and other childhood illnesses, Warner attended the Fifth District School House with her siblings When she was halfway through her sophomore year of high school, her ailments got the better of her and she had to withdraw Instead of formal schooling, she studied at home with a tutor and with her mother, although she never graduated Warner’s first job was for a Sunday school newspaper published in the nearby town of Danielson, which paid her a dollar for every five hundred words she wrote Having written stories since she was nine years old, mostly for her family, she longed to write a book and have it published Her dream came true in 1916 with the publication of The House of Delight, a children’s book about her childhood dollhouse and its residents, Mr and Mrs Delight Shortly after, both Warner and her sister began publishing stories and essays in magazines such as the Atlantic Monthly, Ladies’ Home Journal, House Beautiful, and Harper’s In 1918, as the United States became involved in World War I, the resulting dearth of educators led Warner to begin what would become a thirty-two year career teaching first and third grade at the Israel Putnam School At first, she assisted another teacher for a few hours each day, but when that teacher died of influenza during the pandemic of 1918—19, Warner took over She had forty children in her morning class and another forty in the afternoon, and her salary was raised five times—from four hundred to one thousand dollars—during her first year of teaching Meanwhile, she continued to write, composing a nature series for Little Folks magazine, and, in 1918, a Boston publisher collected her many articles about stars and constellations for a children’s astronomy book, Star Stories for Little Folks When Warner suffered a bout of bronchitis that kept her from teaching for several months, she began to write the story that would become The Boxcar Children It was about the Alden children— four orphans who live in a boxcar—and it was inspired by the Putnam Railroad Station across the street from Warner’s childhood home The Boxcar Children, published in 1942, would become the first installment of her beloved mystery series and establish her as a writer of children’s books In 1949 she published the second Boxcar book, Surprise Island The following year, when she turned sixty, Warner finally retired from teaching and devoted herself to writing full-time, publishing books for both children and adults She wrote nineteen Boxcar books in all, including The Yellow House Mystery (1953), Mystery Ranch (1958), The Woodshed Mystery (1962), and Benny Uncovers a Mystery (1976), which would be her last Warner died in Putnam on August 30, 1979, when she was eighty-nine years old But the Boxcar Children live on: To this day, authors contribute new stories to the series, which now totals over one hundred and twenty books A two-year-old Warner around 1892 with her sister, Frances, age four Growing up, Warner earned money by killing flies around the house Her parents paid her the handsome sum of ten cents for every hundred flies she killed Warner’s childhood home in Putnam, Connecticut It had been built for her family by her grandfather, John Carpenter, and was kept heated in the winter by wood and lit at night by kerosene lamps The Putnam railroad, situated across the street from Warner’s childhood home As a child, Warner would stare into the caboose of a parked train and think about how fun it would be to live in one The Warner family From left: Edgar, Frances, John, Gertrude, and Jane Warner, in 1901 at age eleven, poses for a portrait Just two years before, she had completed her first book, Golliwogg at the Zoo, which she illustrated with watercolors and gave as a gift to her grandfather Warner with her first-grade class in 1924 She taught first and third grade for thirty-two years at the Israel Putnam School in Putnam, Connecticut The school building still stands today, though it has been converted into apartments This photo, taken in 1933, shows Warner sitting at the piano while her sister, Frances, holds a violin The Warner family often played music together growing up Warner in 1940, seen wearing a fur coat She was very active in the Congregational Church of Putnam at this time, and in 1948 wrote a history of the church for its centennial celebration Warner writing in her home She published nineteen Boxcar books in all, as well as numerous other books for both children and adults A photo of Warner taken shortly before her death in 1979 Even in retirement, Warner invited students from the Putnam School to visit her at home to enjoy some lemonade and talk about books All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions By payment of the required fees, you have been granted the non-exclusive, non-transferable right to access and read the text of this ebook onscreen No part of this text may be reproduced, transmitted, downloaded, decompiled, reverse engineered, or stored in or introduced into any information storage and retrieval system, in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of the publisher This is a work of fiction Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental copyright © by Albert Whitman & Company ISBN: 978-1-4532-1116-8 This 2010 edition distributed by Open Road Integrated Media 180 Varick Street New York, NY 10014 www.openroadmedia.com ... Benny.” The children laid all their treasures, even the wheels, on a board, and the girls carried the board back to the boxcar between them They put the dishes down by the brook “Now we must wash them,”... Island (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Two) The Yellow House Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Three) Mystery Ranch (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Four) Mike’s Mystery (The Boxcar. .. Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Five) Blue Bay Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Six) The Woodshed Mystery (The Boxcar Children Mysteries Book Seven) The Lighthouse Mystery (The Boxcar Children
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Xem thêm: Gertrude chandler warner the boxcar children mysteries lve (v5 0) , Gertrude chandler warner the boxcar children mysteries lve (v5 0) , I. The Four Hungry Children, II. Night Is Turned into Day, III. A New Home in the Woods, IV. Henry Has Two Surprises, V. The Explorers Find Treasure, VI. A Queer Noise in the Night, VII. A Big Meal from Little Onions, VIII. A Swimming Pool at Last, IX. Fun in the Cherry Orchard, X. Henry and the Free-for-All, XI. The Doctor Takes a Hand, XII. James Henry and Henry James, XIII. A New Home for the Boxcar

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