Presenting on TV and radio~an insiders guide 2003

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Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:24 PM Page i Presenting on TV and Radio Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:24 PM Page ii Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page iii Presenting on TV and Radio An insider’s guide Janet Trewin Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page iv Focal Press An imprint of Elsevier Linacre House, Jordan Hill, Oxford OX2 8DP 200 Wheeler Road, Burlington, MA 01803 First published 2003 Copyright © 2003, Janet Trewin All rights reserved The right of Janet Trewin to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 No part of this publication may be reproduced in any material form (including photocopying or storing in any medium by electronic means and whether or not transiently or incidentally to some other use of this publication) without the written permission of the copyright holder except in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 or under the terms of a licence issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency Ltd, 90 Tottenham Court Road, London, England W1T 4LP Applications for the copyright holder’s written permission to reproduce any part of this publication should be addressed to the publisher Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier’s Science and Technology Rights Department in Oxford, UK: phone: (ϩ44) (0) 1865 843830; fax: (ϩ44) (0) 1865 853333; e-mail: permissions@elsevier.co.uk You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier homepage (www.elsevier.com), by selecting ‘Customer Support’ and then ‘Obtaining Permissions’ British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of Congress ISBN 240 51906 X For information on all Focal Press publications, visit our website at: www.focalpress.com Typeset by Newgen Imaging Systems (P) Ltd., Chennai, India Printed and bound in Great Britain Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page v Contents Acknowledgements vii I What it is and how to it Being a presenter Your voice and how to use it 22 How to look and how to act 40 Interviewing 57 Television essentials 74 Presenting on television 94 Presenting on radio II 113 Types of presentation News and current affairs 139 Sport 151 10 Lifestyle and features 159 11 Music 165 12 Children’s programmes 176 13 International business programmes 184 14 Travel news 192 III Starting out 15 How to get in and get on 201 16 Sexism, ageism, racism and disability 216 17 Top tips 235 Glossary Index 249 255 v Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page vi Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page vii Acknowledgements My sincere thanks go to all who helped in the compilation of this book I hope I have done justice to the views they hold and the information they gave I’m grateful also to the Radio Academy (www.radioacademy.org) which performs the increasingly important task of raising the profile of radio in a televisual world vii Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page viii Trewin-ch01.qxd 7/26/03 7:26 PM Page I What it is and how to it Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 249 Glossary Analogue Video or audio analogue signals are those where the signals are directly analogous to the information that they are trying to represent Therefore a loud sound or a bright picture is represented by a big signal wave; a quiet sound or a dark picture will be represented by a small signal wave This contrasts with digital signals, where the information is represented by numeric information Because digital signals never need to carry any more complex information than or (binary code), they are much more robust than analogue signals and suffer far less degradation during copying from tape to tape (generation losses) and suffer from less interference during transmission Anchor The main presenter responsible for linking the programme Frequently studio-based but not necessarily Atmos Atmosphere Used to describe background sound during a recording e.g ‘Take an atmos track of general street noise.’ Autocue A device allowing the presenter to read script whilst looking at the camera The words scroll in front of the lens but are invisible to the TV viewer Other machines that the same are Teleprompter and Portaprompt Avid Company that has developed a widely used computer-based digital tape editing system Back-timing Counting the duration of a series of programme items or a script from the end back to the beginning so that you can be sure it will fit the available time For example, starting to speak your piece to camera whilst walking away from the camera to find where you will have to be standing when you start it and wish to walk towards the lens BCU Big close up A very close shot of an object If it’s of a person, it would cut off the top of the forehead and the lower part of the chin Caption generator Equipment that displays text on screen, such as names and designations 249 Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 250 GLOSSARY Catchline Also known as the ‘slug’ The name or title that identifies the item and which is written on everything relating to it – the disc, the tape, the tape box, the computer scripts, the cues etc Clip A short excerpt from a longer item, usually involving speech, for use on either a TV or a radio broadcast For example, ‘Get me a clip of the Queen’s speech and we’ll voice round it [write a script in which it will be included].’ Copy story A scripted item that has no added film or audio to accompany it Copy tasting Checking through written material (copy) to assess it for inaccuracies and relevance CSO Colour separation overlay, sometimes referred to as Chromakey A method of electronically replacing a screen of one colour with pictures, either moving or still, which is used a lot in newscasts The pictures are invisible to the presenter but are seen by the audience Cue Used either to refer to the introductory information to an item that is read by the presenter, as in ‘cue material’, or simply as a warning that something is about to happen, as in ‘cue programme’ (meaning the programme is starting) or ‘cue Janet’ (meaning Janet should start speaking immediately) Similarly, the cue light is the lamp in the studio on the desk, the door, the wall or table that alerts everyone that the studio will go live imminently DAB Digital Audio Broadcasting Digital See Analogue Down the line An interview or presentation that is made in vision, with good quality sound, but without the interviewer present The questions are heard via an earpiece and the interviewee will look directly at the camera – one of the few occasions this is done during an interview The interviewer hears through an earpiece and usually sees the interviewee on a monitor Dubbing A number of meanings: To transfer or copy recorded material from one tape to another To record the final soundtrack of a film, including the commentary To create a foreign language version of an item Empty-chairing The situation where one of the expected or desired participants in the debate does not appear It can happen innocently due to 250 Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 251 GLOSSARY the interviewee’s full diary or it can be contrived, for all sorts of reasons, by either side Fader The switch or lever used to bring in or take out sound or vision in a graduated way on a sliding scale FX Sound effects Gallery The operational heart of the TV programme The darkened room (not necessarily adjoining the studio) where the director and producer sit with other technical operators, watching the studio action on monitors whilst also checking the output GV In TV terminology, a general view shot of a location or action frequently used as ‘an establisher’ i.e to set the scene Hot board A table generated by computer graphics to detail information, often facts and statistics For example, of market prices in a business programme In words The first words spoken on the film or sound tape/disc that are transcribed onto the programme script to identify the start of the item and ensure it’s the correct item (see also Out words) ITC Independent Television Commission Links The script between inserts and interviews in a package or in a programme MFR Moray Firth Radio, broadcasting to the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and based in Inverness Noddies The reaction shots of the interviewer nodding, smiling or looking quizzical These are usually filmed after the interview and are used to cover any edits OB Outside broadcast A TV or radio programme or item presented away from base, often with the aid of an OB van in the OB location Out words The final words of an item on TV or radio that indicate the end is coming These are transcribed onto the script to warn that a piece is about to finish PA Production assistant Package An item involving the presenter as well as pre-recorded inserts, as in ‘news package’ 251 Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 252 GLOSSARY Pan Short for panoramic view A shot achieved by a horizontal sweep of the camera from left to right or right to left PDP Personal Digital Production The BBC’s terminology for a video journalist – namely the lone presenter/reporter who researches, fixes, shoots, edits and presents Post mortem The discussion after a programme or item which reviews all aspects of the broadcast PTC Piece to camera A section of a film where the presenter addresses the camera directly, also known as a stand-up Radio mic Radio microphone A microphone attached by a thin wire to a battery-operated power pack and with a short aerial lead that can slip into your pocket or onto your belt, allowing free movement RDS Radio Data System A means of transmitting text normally accompanying audio output Re-take Another attempt to get the recording fault-free, done either for better sound or for better pictures Record as live The programme or item will be recorded as if it were going live There will be no stopping and it will run for the correct length of time A method used increasingly to achieve a ‘live feel’ and also to save money Running time The time in minutes and seconds noted on the right-hand side of a film script at key points (at each change of location and after each interview or PTC), allowing you to see at a glance how far into the item you are Rushes The uncut filmed material that will be edited to make the final cut story SCU Single camera unit The production technique requiring only the reporter/presenter and the camera operator Self opping Where the presenter operates the broadcasting output equipment him or herself Most DJs and radio newsreaders this Increasingly, regional TV news studios are self op Sig tune Signature tune, referring to the opening music for a programme Sound bite A short excerpt from an interview to be used on its own, either on film or in audio Particularly used with reference to news bulletins 252 Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 253 GLOSSARY Static A TV shot where the camera stays still and the framing is not changed Strap The label put on the screen identifying the person speaking or detailing other information Subs Sub-editors The people who write and re-write news stories Talkback The sound link between the gallery and the studio floor, heard in earpieces by the crew and the presenters Tilt A shot achieved using a vertical movement of the camera downwards or upwards Time code An automatic numbering system of each frame of the tape in hours, minutes and seconds It may be set to the real time of day or to the time elapsed since filming began It’s displayed on editing machines so you can identify which bits should be cut Some cameras will burn the time code onto the tape if the settings are wrong which will make the tape useless for broadcast Track This can refer to the spoken script or a section of it which may or may not be numbered or lettered e.g ‘Read your opening track’ or, ‘Read track again’ or, ‘Lay the track’ (meaning record all of the script) It also denotes the different sound layers that can be recorded at the same time or added later e.g a track for the interviewer on one microphone, a track for the interviewee on a different microphone In post-production, more layers or tracks can be added e.g music ‘Track’ is the verb describing the camera’s movement across the ground following the action, often on a platform running on a track Two way An interview involving only the presenter and one other TX Transmission e.g ‘The TX is on Thursday.’ VJ Video journalist The common term for a lone presenter/reporter who shoots and edits his or her material with no other crew (see PDP) Voicepiece The radio equivalent of a piece to camera – an uninterrupted monologue by the presenter, often setting the scene or giving background information VT Video tape 253 Glossary.qxd 7/26/03 7:39 PM Page 254 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 255 Index Aberdeen Press and Journal, 140 Accents, 24–7, 197 Ad libbing: children’s presenters, 180–2 clarity of, 215 DJs, 171–2 on radio, 115–17 on TV, 162 running commentary, 118–19 sporting commentary, 152–3 Age: first job, 222, 238 of children’s presenters, 182 of female presenters, 217–18 of Newsbeat reporters, see also Ageism Ageism, 216, 219–21 Angles, 59–60 Appearance, 40–8 accessories, 45 beards, 190–1 colours and patterns, 44–5, 190 deoderant, 43 dressing for radio, 40–2 dressing for TV, 42–56, 148–9 eyebrows, 232 for sports presenters, 153 hairstyles, 46, 148 hands, 47, 190, 245 lip-gloss poisoning, 189 looks, 215, make-up, 48, 150, 244 manicure, 47 posture, 32 suits, 43, 44, 148–9 weight, 163, 232 Audiences: black, 169–73 figures, 174 importance of language to, 115–17 importance of size, 174 importance of voice to, 24 importance of writing style to, 123–4 of business programmes, 188 of radio music shows, 16–17, 165–7 Autocue, 74–8, 180–1 Beddows, Surrey, 230 Being producible, 54–5, 144, 182 Birt, John, 141 Blindness, 223–9 Breathing, 31–2 Broadcasting organizations: Anglia TV, 75, 229 BBC, 16, 31, 43, 185, 186, 190, 212, 219, 222, 235 BBC 2, 14–15, 27–8, 34, 68–9, 159 BBC 4, 145 BBC News 24, 221 BBC Radio 1FM, 5–7, 31, 33, 34, 113, 116–17, 165, 168 BBC Radio 2, 116, 165, 225 BBC Radio 4, 14, 24–5, 98, 121, 129–33, 140, 147, 153, 223 BBC Radio Live, 26, 55, 115, 116–17, 121–2, 153, 193, 237, 239 BBC Radio Bristol, 115 BBC Radio Lincolnshire, 153 BBC Radio London, 118 BBC Radio Northampton, 212, 213 BBC Radio Solent, 224–5 BBC Three Counties Radio, 213 BBC World, 100, 145 BBC World Service, 132, 208 Border TV, 202 Capital Gold, 210 Capital Radio, 173, 193 CBBC, 177–83 Cbeebies, 180 CBS, 217 CCTV, 217, 218 Central TV, 185, 225 Century FM, 210 Channel 4, 3, 4, 13, 16,145, 185, 226, 235 Channel 5, 33 Choice FM, 170, 173 CNBC, 48, 100, 105–11, 184–91 CNN, 190 255 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 256 INDEX Broadcasting organizations (continued) Core, 174 Discovery Channel, 183 EMAP, 116, 210 Flextech, GMTV, 4, 42–3, 202 GWR Group, 116, 165 Heart, 165 HTV, 213, 217 Invicta Radio, 35 ITN, 16, 87, 195 ITV, 16 Kiss, 165 LBC, 118, 177, 193, 196, 235 Magic, 102, 117 Mercury FM, 196 Metro Radio, 196 Moray Firth Radio, 219–20 Piccadilly Key, 103, 210 Piccadilly Radio, 24, 26 Power FM, 130, 173 Radio City, 26, 43, 210, 211 Radio Forth, Red Rose Radio, 26 Rock FM, 210 Sky, 4, 190 Surf, 174 University Radio Warwick, 168 Virgin Radio, 43, 168–75, 209, 211 Business programmes, 105–11, 184–91 Camera operator: directing the, 51–4 duties of, 95, 98 filming PTC, 87–8, 163 Harman, David, 87 Jones, Dave, 90–1, 244–5 Personal Digital Production, 94 Celebrity presenters, 9, 57–8 art experts, 11 authors, 219–20 builders, 11 chefs, 9, 159–64 club DJs, 170 comedians, 246, 180 gardeners, 12 historians, 11 scientists, 246 singers, 180 sports personalities, 155–6 Charisma, 145 Children’s presentation, 176–83 256 Child care, 146–7, 218–19 City University, 29, 145, 207, 210, 213 Clothes, 40–6, 148–9, see also Appearance Cock-ups: autocue failure, 77–8 avoidance of, on OBs, 129 drying, 91 fluffing, 90, 122, 148 see also Nightmares Contacts, 207–8, 243 Cooking programmes, 159–64 Cue material: for interviews, 60 for radio, 123–5 for TV, 80 Current affairs, 139–50 CV, 204–5 Daily Mail, 144 Dartford Times, 196 Demo tapes, see Show reels Diction, 34, see also Voice Disability, 223–34 Disability Discrimination Act, 29, 223 Dismissal: due to: age, 220–1 failure on air, 100 ignorance of law, 119–21 re-inventing yourself, 150 DJs, 16–17, 165–75 Dressing: for radio, 40–2 for TV, 42–8 Dubbing, 83–4 Earpiece, 101, 102 Economist, The, 143 Editing, 53–4 E-mailing, 116 Emphasis, 35–7 Ethnic issues, 19, 48, 169–70, 202 Eustace, Peter, 246 Fame: adopting a persona, 191 building a career on, 13 creating a persona, 18–21 criticism because of, 17 ego trip, 242 fanciability factor, 42–3 mucking in, 244 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 257 INDEX pomposity, 49–50, 157, 181 poseurs, 236 radio, 113–14 work comes before, 240 seductive, 247 see also Lip-gloss poisoning Film crew, 94–6 Financial Times, 186 Flextech, Fluffing, 122, 148 Foreign broadcasting, see International broadcasting Freeman, Paul, 25–6, 245–6 Gardening, 12 Gilvear, Ian, 8–9, 11 Grammar, 63, 80 Guardian, 141 Hairstyles, 46 Haworth, Jan, 13, 23–4, 26–30, 35–7, 217–18, 243–4 History, 12, 91 Howard, Michael, 68 Howell, Lis, 4–5, 11, 17, 42–3, 54, 99–100, 201–2, 237–8 Independent Television Commission, 139, 221 International broadcasting, 105–11, 184–91, 217–18 Interviewees: aftercare, 70–2 preparation of, 64–7, 103, 109 Interviewing, 57–73 illustrated two-way, 150 length, 63–4 preparing, 58–60, 189 questions, 60–3 sensitive subjects, 14–15, 27–8 skill, 181 Jewellery, 45–6 Job hunting, 201–15, 235–48 age, 219–21 attitude, 228–9 CV, 204–5 clothes, 43 contacts, 207–8 disabillity, 223–34 blindness, 223–9 unimportance of, 236 wheelchair user, 229–34 fanciability factor, 42–3 importance of audience size, 174 improving skills, 233–4 luck, 235–48 persistence, 208 race, 221–3 sexism, 216–19 team-working, 49–54 what the talent spotters want: children’s broadcasting, 178–81, 182–3 flavour of the month, 11, 201 general broadcasting, 196–7 Journalism: as a route to presentation, 13 courses, importance of, 7, 212, 240, 241 importance of: for blind presenters, 228 for celebrity presenters, for lifestyle presenters, 242–3 for news presenters, 144 for sports presenters, 155–6 need for, 3–5 reporter/presenters, training, 29, 43, 94, 148, 201 Language, 63, 181, 184, 189, 239, see also Scripts Law, 30, 59, 69, 88, 116, 119–21 Laying voice track, 8, 82–4 Ledwidge, Bob, 97, 99, 238 Lifestyle programmes, 159–64, 242–3 Lip-gloss poisoning, 189 Listeners, see Audience Live transmissions: by blind presenter, 224–5 in studio, 99–111 outside broadcasts, 118–19 to international audience, 188–9 without script, 215 Local radio, 171–2, 195, 219–20, 224–5, 238, 239 London College of Printing, 177 Make-up, 48, 150, 244 Manicure, 47 Marketing, 16–17, 165–7 McKenzie, Rod Music: classical, presentation of, 219 DJs, 116–17 presenters, research into, 16–7, 165–7 studios, 127 Nerves: absence of, 142, 156 dangers of, 158 news reading, 210 257 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 258 INDEX Nerves (continued) overcoming, 30–1, 162 stress experiment, 190 News and current affairs: on commercial radio, 210–11, 226 programmes, presentation of, 132–3, 139–50, 168–9 studio equipment, 97–8 travel news, 194–5 News Trainee Scheme, BBC, 145, 185, 205, 222 Newspapers, 141 Newsreading, 121–2 breathing, 31–2 for commercial radio, 24 nerves, 210 nightmares, 13–14 understanding copy, 212 voice, 215 see also Scripting Nightmares: ants, 13–14 being dropped, 243 breathlessness, 31 deadlines, 214 exhaustion, 172 fear, 210–11 flood, 118–19 fog, 214 forgetting, 122 Hillsborough disaster, 156–7 identity, 108 kebabing, 143–4 miscarriage, 14 power failure, 13–14 practical joke, 212 rain, 132 September 11th 2001, 195, 236 spiral staircase, 232 suffering, 212 suicide, 13–14 swearing, 129–31 technical failure, 100 timings, 108–11 vicious mouse, 99–100 wrong VT, 99 Orchard, Steve, 116 Outside broadcasts, 118–19, 129–31,152–3, 156–7 Pace, 34–5 Personal Digital Production, 94, 212–15 Phone-ins, 116, 120 258 Piece to Camera, 84–91 by blind presenter, 226 by wheelchair user, 230–1 dangerous, 88, 91 for recorded feature, learning, 89, 91 location of, 86–9 performing, 89–91, 226 purpose of, 85–6 taste and decency, 88–9 with peacock, 47 Posture, 32–3 Presentation skills, 3–4, 9–21 Presenters: Bacon, Richard, 183 Bailey, Andrew, 43, 209–12 Ball, Zoe, 179, 180, 183 Bates, Simon, 116, 117 Black, Cilla, 180 Bolderson, Claire, 132–3 Bowman, Georgina, 5–7, 33, 113 Britton, Fern, 162 Bruce, Fiona, 221 Buerk, Michael, 221 Caesar, Julia, 217 Clary, Julian, 19 Clunes, Martin, 246 Cox, Sarah, 180 Cram, Steve, 155 Currie, Edwina, 9, 115–16, 237 Dando, Jill, 18 Davidson, Jim, 180 Dibnah, Fred, 11 Donaldson, Peter, 24–5, 30, 120, 147, 247–8 Edwards, Huw, 221 Evans, Chris, 171, 180 Evans, Richard, 55, 121–2, 239 Frenkiel, Olenka, 18, 245 Golly, David, 97 Goodier, Mark, Graham, Leona, 16, 167–75 Graves, Keith, 190 Greening, Kevin, 116, 117 Handy Andy, 13 Haworth, Jan, 13, 23–4, 26–30, 35–7, 217–18, 243–4 Harriott, Ainsley, 164 Hewat, Jonathan, 28, 117, 216, 242 Howell, Lis, 4–5, 11, 17, 42–3, 54, 99–100, 201–2, 237–8 Humphreys, John, 238 Inverdale, John, 153–8 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 259 INDEX Jago, Becky, 239–40 Kelly, Ross, 202 Kerr, Wesley, 13, 19, 48, 49, 88–9, 222–3, 242–3 Lang, Kirsty, 43, 98, 121, 145–50, 205, 208 Lawley, Sue, 214 Ledwidge, Bob, 97, 99, 238 Lloyd, Tim, 196 MacGregor, Sue, 220 MacPherson, Archie, Marr, Andrew, 190 Marshall, May, 219–20 Mayo, Simon, 116–17 McColl, Andy, 193–7 McDonald, Sir Trevor, 16, 221 McKenzie, Rod, 7, 33 McNerney, Bryan, 91 Mills, Jenni, 27, 30, 114–15, 129–31, 204, 240 Moore, Patrick, 43 Moyles, Chris, Naughtie, James, 139–45 Norton, Graham, 16 Oliver, Jamie, 164 Parkinson, Michael, 181 Paxman, Jeremy, 68–9 Peel, John, 31 Peters, Andy, 183 Quentin, Caroline, 246 Rahemtulla, Simon, 194 Raworth, Sophie, 221 Rhodes, Gary, 164 Richard and Judy, Roberts, Nigel, 48, 100, 105–11, 184–91 Robinson, Winifred, 26–7, 30 Ross, Jonathan, 22 Schama, Simon, 11–12 Schofield, Philip, 177, 181 Sharpe, Rod, Sheeter, Laura, 94, 212–15, 216 Sissons, Peter, 221 Sister Wendy, 11 Skinner, Richard, 116, 117 Smith, Delia, 163 Smith, Penny, 202 Snow, Jon, 3, 13, 235–6 Stevens, Maddy, 178, 179 Tarrant, Chris, 16, 173 Thomas, Simon, 183 Titchmarsh, Alan, 12–13 Trewin, Janet, 14–15, 20–1, 23, 100, 122 Turner, Brian, 159–64 Vaughan, Johnny, 180 Walker, Angus, 87 Walker, Murray, 12 Wark, Kirsty, Warr, Sandy, 118–19, 247 Wax, Ruby, 19 White, Peter, 223–9 Winston, Robert, 246 Witchell, Nicholas, 214 Wogan, Terry, 16, 116 Worrall Thompson, Antony, 160, 164 Programmes: Agenda, 132 Anglia News, 75 Blue Peter, 183 Channel News, 3, 13, 145–50, 185, 223–5 Classic FM, 202 Classic Rock Show, 170 Countryfile, Food and Drink, 159 Going Live, 177, 183 Going Places, 132 Granada Reports, 17 Holiday, 7, 183 In Touch, 225 John Dunn Show, 225 Link, 226 London Tonight, 210 Market Watch, 187 Market Wrap, 187 Nationwide, 13 Newsbeat, 5–7, 33, 113 Newshour, 132 Newsnight, 20–1, 27–8, 34, 68–9, 145, 242 Panorama, 222, 242 Power Lunch, 105–11 Ready, Steady, Cook, 162 Same Difference, 226 Sky News, South Today, 228 Squawk Box, 187 Ten O’Clock News, BBC, 221 Terry Wogan, 116 This Morning, 161 Through the Night, 196 Today, 26–7, 139–45, 153, 225 Tomorrow’s World, 183 Top Gear, Top of the Pops, 176 Trisha Show, 233 Watchdog, 242 Weekend, 129–31 Weekend World, 141 Woman’s Hour, 225 259 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 260 INDEX Programmes (continued) World At One, 141 World Tonight, 132–3 You and Yours, 8, 26, 223, 228 Projecting, 33–4 Queen, The, 8, 24, 118, 133–4 Queen’s English, 24, 26 Questions, 60–4 Racism, 221–3 Radio Academy, 16, 165 Received pronunciation, 24–5 Relaxation exercises, 30–2 Researching: ad libbing, for, 115–16 blind presenter, by, 227 DJ’ing, for, 169 interviews, for, 58–9 Queen’s visit, for, 134 running commentary, for, 118 sports commentary, for, 58–9 Roberts, Phil, 116 Running commentary, 118–19, 152–3, see also Ad libbing Satellite links, 103 Scotsman, The, 141 Scripts: radio: cue material, 123 features, 125–6 layout, 124–6 news, 121 reading, 122 style, 123–4 timings, 123 travel news, 192–3 voice pieces, 123–4 writing, 122–6 television, 78–84 checking, 100–1 cue material, 80–1 dubbing, 83–4 laying the track, 82–4 layout, 78–9 performing, 162 time codes, 78, 83 timings, 82 writing, 80 writing to picture, 81–2 Sexism, 218–19 260 Show reels, 203–4 bombarding employers with, 168–9, 241 Smith, Paul, 177–83 Spectator, The, 143 Sport, 9, 12, 88, 118–19, 129–31, 151–8 Statesman, The, 143 Studio: access, 232 live, TV, 99–111 radio, 126–8 self-op, 127–8 TV crew, 96–9 Suits, 44 Sunday Times, The, 145 Talent spotting, 201–15, 235–48 attitude, 233–4 blind presenters, 228 Brian Turner, 163 children’s presenters, 178–80 difficulty of, 11 for Newsbeat, 1FM, through digital radio 173 see also Job hunting Team working, 18, 49–54, 181, 202 Text messaging, 116 Thatcher, Margaret, 21 Topalian, Sarah, 241–2 Training to present: absence of: Evans, Richard, 121–2 Lang, Kirsty, 147 Naughtie, James, 142 Roberts, Nigel, 190 Snow, Jon, 235 journalism courses, 201, 212, see also Journalism pointless, 190, 236 private courses, 204 unsuccessful, 11 voice training, 212, 240, see also Voice Travel news, 192–7, 239 University of the West of England, 28, 117, 216 Voice, 22–39 accents, 24–7, 197 breathing, 31–2 delivery, 242 diction, 34 laying track, 8, 82–4 on a stick, 7, 13, 121–2, 244 pace, 34–5, 152, 215 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 261 INDEX practice, 196, 243 projecting, 33–4 training: cost, 28 on journalism courses, 28–30, 240 on the job, 35–7 personal tuition, 147–8, 212 unnecessary, 190 using music, 243 voice pieces, 123–4 Wall Street Journal, 185, 186 Week, The, 143 Wheelchair user, 229–34 Women, 218–19 childcare, 146–7 DJs, 167–8, 174 Voices of, 22, 31 Work, see Job hunting Working day, examples of: Market Wrap, CNBC Europe, 186–7 Newsbeat, 1FM, 5–7 Today, Radio 4, 143 TV features, 7–8 World News, BBC 4, 149–50 261 index.qxd 7/26/03 8:07 PM Page 262 Trewin-ad.qxd 7/26/03 7:40 PM Page 263 ... 7/26/03 7:24 PM Page i Presenting on TV and Radio Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:24 PM Page ii Trewin-FM.qxd 7/26/03 7:25 PM Page iii Presenting on TV and Radio An insider’s guide Janet Trewin Trewin-FM.qxd... Interviewing 57 Television essentials 74 Presenting on television 94 Presenting on radio II 113 Types of presentation News and current affairs 139 Sport 151 10 Lifestyle and features 159 11 Music... can only be built on fiercely high standards of communication: Because you’ve done television history there’s an assumption that you’re dumbing down the content of what you’re doing I defy anyone
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