Dream Beyond the Dream

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Chapter 4 Beyond the Basics In this chapter, we describe some of the finer points of MATLAB and review in more detail some of the concepts introduced in Chapter 2. We explore enough of MATLAB’s internal structure to improve your ability to work withcomplicated functions, expressions, and commands. At the end of this chapter, we introduce some of the MATLAB commands for doing calculus. Suppressing Output Some MATLAB commands produce output that is superfluous. For example, when you assign a value to a variable, MATLAB echoes the value. You can suppress the output of a command by putting a semicolon after the command. Here is an example: >> syms x >>y=x+7 y= x+7 >>z=x+7; >> z z= x+7 The semicolon does not affect the way MATLAB processes the command internally, as you can see from its response to the command z. 50 Data Classes 51 You can also use semicolons to separate a string of commands when you are interested only in the output of the final command (several examples appear later in the chapter). Commas can also be used to separate commands without suppressing output. If you use a semicolon after a graphics command, it will not suppress the graphic. ➱ The most common use of the semicolon is to suppress the printing of a long vector, as indicated in Chapter 2. Another object that you may want to suppress is MATLAB’s label for the output of a command. The command disp is designed to achieve that; typing disp(x) will print the value of the variable x without printing the label and the equal sign. So, >>x=7; >> disp(x) 7 or >> disp(solve(’x + tan(y) = 5’, ’y’)) -atan(x-5) Data Classes Every variable you define in MATLAB, as well as every input to, and output from, a command, is an array of data belonging to a particular class.Inthis book we use primarily four types of data: floating point numbers, symbolic expressions, character strings, and inline functions. We introduced each of these types in Chapter 2. In Table 4–1, we list for each type of data its class (as given by whos ) and how you can create it. Type of data Class Created by Floating point double typing a number Symbolic sym using sym or syms Character string char typing a string inside single quotes Inline function inline using inline Table 4-1 You can think of an array as a two-dimensional grid of data. A single number (or symbolic expression, or inline function) is regarded by MATLAB as a 1 × 1 52 Chapter 4: Beyond the Basics array, sometimes called a scalar.A1× n array is called a row vector, and an m × 1 array is called a column vector. (A string is actually a row vector of characters.) An m × narray of numbers is called a matrix; see More on Matrices below. You can see the class and array size of every variable you have defined by looking in the Workspace browser or typing whos (see Managing Variables in Chapter 2). The set of variable definitions shown by whos is called your Workspace. To use MATLAB commands effectively, you must pay close attention to the class of data eachcommand accepts as input and returns as output. The input to a command consists of one or more arguments separated by commas; some arguments are optional. Some commands, suchas whos, do not require any input. When you type a pair of words, such as hold on, MATLAB interprets the second word as a string argument to the command given by the first word; thus, hold on is equivalent to hold(’on’). The help text (see Online Help in Chapter 2) for each command usually tells what classes of inputs the command expects as well as what class of output it returns. Many commands allow more than one class of input, though sometimes only one data class is mentioned in the online help. This Dream Beyond the Dream Dream Beyond the Dream By: Joe Tye The morning chill had long since evaporated, so Charlie had tied his flannel hiking shirt to the outside of his backpack to let it dry Almost exactly thirty years ago, he had written down in his Dreamcyclopedia a goal to spend a week alone hiking in the Grand Canyon He’d never thought it would take this long, but now here he was, high on a ledge overlooking the Colorado River He had not seen another human being in four days It was hard to maintain the appropriate state of awe in this magnificent cathedral, where every vista seemed to outdo the one before As he rounded a corner, Charlie saw a hollow in the limestone wall that just seemed to cry out for him to stop and take a break Dropping his backpack onto the ground, he extracted a bag of gorp, his water bottle, and his journal He picked up his walking stick and turned it slowly in his hands, again reading each of the names that had been meticulously carved into it Each name brought back a memory of someone who had helped him build The Courage Place into a worldwide phenomenon – more a movement than a business – through which thousands of people had found a sense of direction, and the courage and determination to follow it The business had grown in many directions that Charlie would never have anticipated in the early days, and the dream continued to get bigger and bigger The walking stick had been a gift at his retirement party several months earlier It was presented to him by Cheryl von Noyes, who had become CEO of Future Perfect Now upon the retirement of Bill Douglas “Just as we have leaned on you throughout the years,” she’d said in her remarks, “now we want you to know that you can lean on us wherever your trail leads you.” Charlie knew that was why he was in the Grand Canyon at this time, and why the trip had been delayed for so long Thirty years ago, Alan Silvermane had told him to “Dream Beyond the Dream.” Charlie hoped that Silvermane would have been proud of what he’d accomplished; the thirty-five year old Charlie who’d sat in the office with Silvermane would certainly been astounded to review the accomplishments of the sixty-five year old man he would someday become Although not many people knew the name Charlie McKeever, The Courage Place had become one of the world’s most familiar brands There was a Courage Place in almost 1/2 Dream Beyond the Dream every hospital, every airport, every shopping center, everywhere in the world Every day, millions of people across the globe logged onto The Courage Place web site for a daily dose of education and inspiration Courage Place graduates had started businesses which created millions of new jobs; served in local, state, and federal government at all levels; had started non-profit organizations and social service agencies to deal with the world’s most pressing problems; and to Charlie most important of all, had become teachers, instructing the next generation on the skills and attitudes of courage and perseverance Now the time had come for Charlie to dream beyond the dream He had plenty of money and, he hoped, a lot more time to continue making a difference, to continue creating an enduring legacy For some time, he had been writing down ideas in his journal He’d whittled that list down to a few that really excited him In the next few days, he would decide upon one of them Charlie opened the journal and reviewed his list again It would be a tough choice Looking down the river, he saw a tiny spot slowly growing larger as it came closer It was unusual, he thought, to see a raven so high, flying solo, kiting the wind along the river As it came closer, it squawked loudly, and Charlie realized that this was not a raven It was an eagle It coasted down the river, like an angel dancing on the breath of God, closer to Charlie When it was not twenty yards away, the eagle tilted on one wing and flew by so close that Charlie almost could have reached out and touched it with his walking stick Now right above Charlie, the eagle down and squawked once more Charlie looked up and looked into the face of his guardian eagle He had only one eye Charlie closed his eyes and closed his journal, and smiled into the sun He would sleep for awhile And dream A new dream A big dream The dream beyond the dream THE END 2/2 6 Regulation above and beyond the state 6.1 Overview The preceding chapters have identified and developed a series of analytical tools and framing devices that assist in mapping the growing field of regulation scholarship. As we made clear in the introductory chapter, our focus has hitherto assumed that regulation takes place within a nation-state. The explosion of interest in, and literature about, globalisation since the early 1990s reflects the changing regulatory landscapes and calls for examination of this assumption. Accordingly, this chapter will explore the degree to which the analytical tools and framing devices used throughout the preceding chapters can be applied to the suprana- tional context, building directly upon the conceptual structure developed through- out the book. Although each field of social science is developing a voluminous literature on globalisation, broadly understood in various different terminologies, we will consciously avoid any attempt to map these terrains, although we occasionally cite some literature by way of brief example. Thus, unlike the earlier chapters, we are not integrating existing literatures into our mapping exercise, and as a result this chapter does not include extracts from selected texts. Rather, this chapter does two things. Firstly, we explore whether theories and techniques of regulation, as well as issues of regulatory enforcement and legitimacy, can be transposed to the supranational context. Secondly, we consider the role of law in regulation above and beyond the state. The essence of our argument will be that the conceptual apparatus adopted in the earlier chapters transposes with relative ease into a supranational frame, but the role and contribution of law shifts significantly. Our argument is analytically dependent upon the earlier chapters, and therefore this chapter is less freestanding than the other chapters. It can, however, be read in combination with Chapter 1, although the nuance of the argument is best fleshed out by reading the earlier chapters first. Before outlining the elements of our argument, it is helpful first to clarify what we mean by ‘law’ and ‘supranational’ in this chapter. In keeping with the pre- ceding chapters, we will continue to adopt a state-centric definition of law: that is, a conception of law as authoritative rules backed by coercive force, exercised at the national level by a legitimately constituted (democratic) nation-state, and 303 constituted in the supranational context by binding commitments voluntarily entered into between sovereign states (that is, typified by public international law). Our references to a supranational context aim to capture purposive attempts to regulate behaviour that draws upon multiple sources of norms and rules arising at more than one level. In particular, our interest in this chapter is in the relationship between these multiple sources of authoritative norms. While the nature of networked relationships resonates with ‘decentred’ approaches to reg- ulation (referred to in earlier chapters) and challenges hierarchical conceptions of these relationships, our emphasis on state-centric law in a supranational context highlights questions of national sovereignty with which a decentred analysis does not necessarily engage. With these questions in mind, our examination encom- passes transnational regulation of the kind that occurs in the European Union (EU) and the World Trade Organisation (WTO), as well as through cross-border voluntary initiatives. Since our primary goal is to Excel 2007 Beyond the Manual - Apress 2007 Excel 2007 Helen Dixon 7982FM.qxd 2/26/07 1:44 PM Page iii Excel 2007: Beyond the Manual Copyright © 2007 by Helen Dixon All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner and the publisher. ISBN-13 (pbk): 978-1-59059-798-9 ISBN-10 (pbk): 1-59059-798-2 Printed and bound in the United States of America 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Trademarked names may appear in this book. Rather than use a trademark symbol with every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use the names only in an editorial fashion and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Lead Editor: Jonathan Hassell Technical Reviewer: Judith Myerson Editorial Board: Steve Anglin, Ewan Buckingham, Gary Cornell, Jason Gilmore, Jonathan Gennick, Jonathan Hassell, James Huddleston, Chris Mills, Matthew Moodie, Jeff Pepper, Paul Sarknas, Dominic Shakeshaft, Jim Sumser, Matt Wade Project Manager: Richard Dal Porto Copy Edit Manager: Nicole Flores Copy Editor: Liz Welch Assistant Production Director: Kari Brooks-Copony Production Editor: Laura Esterman Compositor: Dina Quan Proofreaders: Elizabeth Berry and Lori Bring Indexer: Valerie Perry Artist: April Milne Cover Designer: Kurt Krames Manufacturing Director: Tom Debolski Distributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York, Inc., 233 Spring Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10013. Phone 1-800-SPRINGER, fax 201-348-4505, e-mail orders-ny@springer-sbm.com , or visit http://www.springeronline.com . For information on translations, please contact Apress directly at 2560 Ninth Street, Suite 219, Berkeley, CA 94710. Phone 510-549-5930, fax 510-549-5939, e-mail info@apress.com , or visit http://www.apress.com . The information in this book is distributed on an “as is” basis, without warranty. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this work, neither the author(s) nor Apress shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this work. The source code for this book is available to readers at http://www.apress.com in the Source Code/ Download section. 7982FM.qxd 2/26/07 1:44 PM Page iv In memory of my father, Brian McGarry 7982FM.qxd 2/26/07 1:44 PM Page v Contents at a Glance vii About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix About the Technical Reviewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv CHAPTER 1 What’s New in Excel 2007? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHAPTER 2 Customizing Excel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 CHAPTER 3 Excel Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 CHAPTER 4 Styles and Formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 CHAPTER 5 Sorting and Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 CHAPTER 6 Analyzing Data Using Subtotals, Consolidations, and Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 CHAPTER 7 Creating PivotTables and PivotCharts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 CHAPTER 8 Editing PivotTables and PivotCharts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 CHAPTER 9 What-If Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outlook 2007 Tony Campbell, Jonathan Hassell 7966FM_new.qxd 2/15/07 3:31 PM Page iii Outlook 2007: Beyond the Manual Copyright © 2007 by Tony Campbell All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner and the publisher. ISBN-13 (pbk): 978-1-59059-796-5 ISBN-10 (pbk): 1-59059-796-6 Printed and bound in the United States of America 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Trademarked names may appear in this book. Rather than use a trademark symbol with every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use the names only in an editorial fashion and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Lead Editor: Jim Sumser Editorial Board: Steve Anglin, Ewan Buckingham, Gary Cornell, Jason Gilmore, Jonathan Gennick, Jonathan Hassell, James Huddleston, Chris Mills, Matthew Moodie, Dominic Shakeshaft, Jim Sumser, Matt Wade Project Manager: Kylie Johnston Copy Edit Manager: Nicole Flores Copy Editor: Kim Wimpsett Assistant Production Director: Kari Brooks-Copony Production Editor: Ellie Fountain Compositor: Dina Quan Proofreader: Lori Bring Indexer: Michael Brinkman Cover Designer: Kurt Krames Manufacturing Director: Tom Debolski Distributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York, Inc., 233 Spring Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10013. Phone 1-800-SPRINGER, fax 201-348-4505, e-mail orders-ny@springer-sbm.com , or visit http://www.springeronline.com . For information on translations, please contact Apress directly at 2560 Ninth Street, Suite 219, Berkeley, CA 94710. Phone 510-549-5930, fax 510-549-5939, e-mail info@apress.com , or visit http://www.apress.com . The information in this book is distributed on an “as is” basis, without warranty. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this work, neither the author(s) nor Apress shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this work. 7966FM.qxd 2/27/07 9:58 AM Page iv This book is dedicated to my wife, Sharon. Love you, babe. —Tony To my wife, Lisa. Thanks for everything. Oh, and thanks to the cats and dog for keeping things interesting. —Jon 7966FM_new.qxd 2/15/07 3:31 PM Page v Contents at a Glance vii About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii CHAPTER 1 What’s New and What’s Improved in Outlook 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHAPTER 2 Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 CHAPTER 3 Message Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 CHAPTER 4 Contacts and Address Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 CHAPTER 5 Calendaring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 CHAPTER 6 Notes and Journals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 CHAPTER 7 Task Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 CHAPTER 8 Storage Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 CHAPTER 9 Color Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 CHAPTER 10 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 CHAPTER 11 Security and Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 CHAPTER 12 Outlook Outside the Office (or Home) . . . . . . . . . . . 185 CHAPTER 13 Forms and Macros . . . Word 2007Connie MorrisonMorrison_7990Front.fm Page iii Thursday, February 22, 2007 2:25 PMWord 2007: Beyond the ManualCopyright © 2007 by Connie MorrisonAll rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner and the publisher.ISBN-13 (pbk): 978-1-59059-799-6ISBN-10 (pbk): 1-59059-799-0Printed and bound in the United States of America 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1Trademarked names may appear in this book. Rather than use a trademark symbol with every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use the names only in an editorial fashion and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark.Lead Editors: Jonathan Hassell, James HuddlestonTechnical Reviewer: Karla BrowningEditorial Board: Steve Anglin, Ewan Buckingham, Gary Cornell, Jason Gilmore, Jonathan Gennick, Jonathan Hassell, James Huddleston, Chris Mills, Matthew Moodie, Dominic Shakeshaft, Jim Sumser, Matt WadeProject Manager: Richard Dal PortoCopy Edit Manager: Nicole FloresCopy Editor: Ami KnoxAssistant Production Director: Kari Brooks-CoponyProduction Editor: Kelly WinquistCompositor: Susan GlinertProofreader: Nancy RiddioughIndexer: Valerie Haynes PerryArtist: April MilneCover Designer: Kurt KramesManufacturing Director: Tom DebolskiDistributed to the book trade worldwide by Springer-Verlag New York, Inc., 233 Spring Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10013. Phone 1-800-SPRINGER, fax 201-348-4505, e-mail orders-ny@springer-sbm.com, or visit http://www.springeronline.com.For information on translations, please contact Apress directly at 2560 Ninth Street, Suite 219, Berkeley, CA 94710. Phone 510-549-5930, fax 510-549-5939, e-mail info@apress.com, or visit http://www.apress.com. The information in this book is distributed on an “as is” basis, without warranty. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this work, neither the author(s) nor Apress shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this work.Morrison_7990Front.fm Page iv Thursday, February 22, 2007 2:25 PMvAbout the Author. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviiAbout the Technical Reviewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xixAcknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiiiCHAPTER 1 Word 2007 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1CHAPTER 2 Getting Started with the New User Interface . . . . . . . 15CHAPTER 3 Viewing Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33CHAPTER 4 Formatting and Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49CHAPTER 5 Creating Documents More Efficiently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71CHAPTER 6 Designing Page Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127CHAPTER 7 Using Reference Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155CHAPTER 8 Creating Envelopes, Labels, and Merge Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181CHAPTER 9 Working with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199CHAPTER 10 Creating and Using Macros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .Dream Beyond the Dream every hospital, every airport, every shopping center, everywhere in the world Every day, millions of people across the globe logged onto The Courage Place... into the face of his guardian eagle He had only one eye Charlie closed his eyes and closed his journal, and smiled into the sun He would sleep for awhile And dream A new dream A big dream The dream. .. the skills and attitudes of courage and perseverance Now the time had come for Charlie to dream beyond the dream He had plenty of money and, he hoped, a lot more time to continue making a difference,
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