Milliken 02 reading well reading comprehension grades 4 5

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MP3462 Includes Assessment Pages! Reading Well 4–5 Milliken’s Reading Well reading series provides teachers and parents with a wide variety of activities to use at home or in the classroom to enhance your reading program Reading materials and styles of writing include realistic fiction, biography, poetry, fantasy, informational articles, myths, legends, tall tales, and plays or skits The comprehension activities have been selected to provide opportunities for students to practice a variety of reading skills A list of comprehension skills for all grade levels is included on the Reading Comprehension Chart on page A variety of assessment rubrics helps you track progress in achieving those skills Each book in the series is sequential, allowing students to build on skills previous learned The various levels available allows you to select the one most appropriate for an individual student or class Reading Well Grades 4–5 written by Cindy Barden illustrated by Corbin Hillam Author Cindy Barden Illustrator Corbin Hillam Book Design and Production Good Neighbor Press, Inc Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co All rights reserved The purchase of this book entitles the individual teacher/purchaser to reproduce copies by any reproduction process for single classroom use The reproduction of any part of this book for use by an entire school or school system or for any commercial use is strictly prohibited Table of Contents 10 11 12 14 16 17 18 20 22 23 24 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 36 38 39 40 41 Reading Comprehension Skills Bloom’s Taxonomy Assessment of Skills Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy Using Student Assessments Individual Activity Assessment Story Frame Story Map Story Frame/Story Map Assessment Student Reading Comprehension Skills Assessment Student Reading Log and Assessment Belling the Cat A Letter from Plimoth Plantation It’s Perfectly True Making Candles New Rhymes from Old The Legend of King Arthur One Hump or Two? It All Depends on Point of View Quill Pens Ben’s Best Friend State Quarters Chart The State Quarters Program The Civil War Mom for the Day Reading a Map Spice Up Your Life Last Manatee Dies in Miami Zoo The Three Stones Spies in the Skies Character Traits* Analyzing Changes in a Character* Answer Key *These two pages can be used with activities in this book or with any outside story or book students read ii Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Reading Comprehension Skills Activities provide opportunities for students in grades and to practice these reading comprehension skills Skill Page numbers Relate pictures to text 16, 29, 32 Distinguish between reality and fantasy 13, 35 Detect cause and effect 19, 31, 35, 37 Recognize the main idea 20, 25, 37 Compare and contrast 16, 21, 27, 40 Identify significant details 13, 18, 20, 23, 33, 35 Recognize rhymes 17 Sequence events 15, 18, 23 Follow instructions 39 Summarize material 35 Use context clues 18, 19, 25 Predict outcomes 11, 19, 25, 31 Draw conclusions 11, 15, 25, 35, 37, 39, 40 Classify 21, 37 Distinguish between fact and opinion 38 Determine point of view 22 Paraphrase 13, 15, 37 Discover author’s purpose 19, 31, 35, 38 Identify supporting details 21, 23, 27, 33 Make judgements 11, 15, 16, 25, 40 Increase vocabulary skills 18, 19, 23, 38 Analysis 40 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Bloom’s Taxonomy Bloom’s Taxonomy, developed by Benjamin Bloom, divides cognitive objectives into six categories ranging from simple to complex Milliken’s Reading Well series provides opportunities for children to meet these six objectives Knowledge is the ability to memorize information and recall specific facts Skills include recording, outlining, listing, discriminating between facts and opinions, classifying items, distinguishing between definitions and examples, and summarizing material Comprehension is the ability to grasp the meaning of what has been learned rather than simply memorizing facts Skills include comparing and contrasting like and unlike items, identifying steps in a process, interpreting charts and graphs, translating verbal material to mathematical terms, estimating consequences, patterning, and predicting outcomes Application is the ability to use material previously learned in new situations Skills include inferring, estimating, applying concepts to new situations, ordering, sequencing, understanding changes in word meanings, and constructing graphs and charts Analysis is the ability to understand both the content and structural form of material and the ability to break material into its component parts Skills include writing analogies, decoding, using logic, drawing conclusions, predicting sequences, making inferences, and distinguishing between cause and effect Synthesis is the ability to put parts together to form a new whole Skills include planning, deductive reasoning, creative thinking, testing hypotheses, drawing conclusions, problem solving, and planning a project Evaluation is the ability to use definite criteria to judge the value of material for a given purpose Skills include developing and evaluating criteria, determining appropriateness and relevancy of information, discovering common attributes, and evaluating material for extraneous information Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Assessment of Skills Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy Student’s name: _ Skill Level Student Student Student Student has mastered this skill shows high level of proficiency has basic understanding of this skill needs improvement on this skill N/A not applicable at this time Skill Level Knowledge Analysis _ recording _ decoding _ outlining _ using logic _ listing _ writing analogies _ classifying items _ making inferences _ summarizing _ drawing conclusions _ discriminating between facts and opinions _ predicting sequences _ distinguishing between cause and effect _ distinguishing between definitions and examples Synthesis Comprehension _ problem solving _ patterning _ creative thinking _ predicting outcomes _ planning a project _ estimating consequences _ testing hypotheses _ identifying steps in a process _ drawing conclusions _ comparing and contrasting like and unlike items _ deductive reasoning Evaluation Application _ discovering common attributes _ ordering _ developing and evaluating criteria _ inferring _ evaluating material for extraneous information _ sequencing _ constructing graphs and charts _ determining appropriateness and relevancy of information _ applying concepts to new situations _ understanding changes in word meanings Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Using Student Assessments Assessment forms can measure student progress on a variety of reading comprehension skills They also enable you to track a child’s literary development over time Completed forms can be shared with students and their parents, used as motivational tools, and used as guides when completing report cards Individual Activity Assessment Most activities in the Reading Well series provide opportunities for students to sharpen several reading comprehension skills The Individual Activity Assessment form can be used as a follow-up for any activity in this book A copy of it can be attached to the completed activity for students to take home Assessment of Skills Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy This form provides a means of tracking and assessing students’ mastery of specific skills in each of the six subdivisions in Bloom’s Taxonomy Story Frame and Story Map Students can complete the Story Frame and Story Map after reading any type of narrative The Story Frame helps students summarize material they have read The Story Map helps students identify the elements of a story These forms can be used with many of the activities in this book as well as with other books and stories students read Story Frame/Story Map Assessment This form provides a means to assess a student’s reading comprehension level through the use of the story frame, story map, or other types of oral or written book reports completed by students Student Reading Comprehension Skills Assessment This form allows you to assess a student’s overall level on many reading comprehension skills It can be used on a quarterly basis to track progress and provides valuable information for parents about their child’s progress Student Reading Log and Assessment This form is a self-assessment tool for students as well as a progress report It provides an opportunity to learn at what level a student is comfortable reading and to suggest appropriate reading material for the future, providing input for both students and parents Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Individual Activity Assessment Student’s name: _ Date: _ Activity title: Skill Level Student Student Student Student has mastered this skill shows high level of proficiency has basic understanding of this skill needs improvement on this skill Skills needed to complete this activity Check all that apply Skill level _ Relate pictures to text _ _ Distinguish between reality and fantasy _ _ Detect causes and effects _ _ Recognize main idea _ _ Compare and contrast _ _ Identify significant details _ _ Recognize rhymes _ _ Sequence events _ _ Follow instructions _ _ Summarize material _ _ Use context clues _ _ Predict outcomes _ _ Draw conclusions _ _ Synthesize _ _ Determine point of view _ _ Discover author’s purpose _ Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Student’s name: Date: Story Frame Title: _ Author: _ This story is mainly about (name of main character) Other important characters are _ _ This story takes place (when and where) _ _ _ _ The problem is _ _ _ The problem is solved when _ _ _ At the end of the story _ _ _ _ Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Nevada Territory Oregon ry Arizona Territory New Mexico Territory Utah Territory rito Ter Colorado Territory Ind Indian ndiaan Territory Territory Kansas Texas Nebraska Territory Dakota Territory W reproducible S N y Kentuck South Carolina North Carolina 250 250 Key 500 kilometers 500 miles a rid Flo 0 Alabama Pennsylvania New York Vermont West Virginia Virginia Georgia Ohio Michigan Tennessee Illinois E Arkansas Missouri Iowa Minnesota Lou isian a on sin on c is W Mississ ippi Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co Indiana Wa shi ngt Undecided territory Union States and territories Confederate States of America Territory supporting Confederacy Maryland New Jersey Delaware New Hampshire Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut Maine Name: Date: _ The Civil War The American Civil War began in 1861 when several Southern states decided to form their own country, the Confederate States of America ia orn f i l Ca 28 MP3462 Name: Date: _ The Civil War (cont’d) Use the map on the previous page to complete this activity Which states joined the Confederacy? _ _ _ _ _ _ _ What territory supported the Confederacy? Which states remained with the Union? _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Which territories supported the Union? _ _ _ _ Which territory was undecided? _ 29 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Mom for the Day After school, Jessie’s mother sometimes asked her to a few chores, run errands, or watch her four-year-old twin brothers for a while Jessie grumbled every time One morning as Jessie was getting ready for school, her mom reminded her to be home right after school to watch Matt and Eric while she went to the dentist “Why should I have to chores or watch those two?” she complained “I work hard in school all day All you is sit around You don’t even have to go to work You just go in your office and work on the computer.” “You work hard at school, Jessie,” her mother agreed “Maybe you deserve a break How about if I go to school today and you stay home.” “Sounds good to me,” Jessie agreed As her mom went out to catch the bus, Jessie heard Matt and Eric coming down the stairs “What’s for breakfast?” asked Matt “Where’s mom?” Eric asked “Mom went to school,” she told him “I’m mom for the day You can watch cartoons for a while I’m going to have a cup of coffee,” she announced, feeling very grown-up Jessie heard the TV blaring as she made a cup of hot cocoa and went out to get the morning paper A few minutes later she went to check on the twins The floor was covered with dry cereal “We were hungry You didn’t make us breakfast, so we made our own,” Matt explained “Go outside and play while I clean up this mess,” she told them as she went to get the vacuum cleaner Before she had half the mess cleaned up, she heard the boys shouting outside “Now what are they up to?” she wondered Through the window, Jessie saw Matt and Eric chasing their dog, Buster, through the garden with the hose Matt was wetter and muddier than Buster Eric was wetter and muddier than Matt or Buster 30 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Mom for the Day (cont’d) “Get in here immediately!” she shouted In came the boys and Buster, tracking muddy footprints across the clean kitchen floor “Look at you two,” she shouted as she marched them to the bathroom Buster followed Jessie didn’t notice the muddy stains on the carpeting up the stairs and down the hall to the bathroom Jessie started running the bath water When the phone rang, she ran to answer it By the time she returned from telling the telemarketer she didn’t need new windows, water was running out of the bathroom onto the carpet in the hall, mixing with the muddy footprints Jessie rushed into the bathroom Matt, Eric, and Buster were happily playing in the water on the floor They weren’t any cleaner, but the bathroom floor and walls were now muddy too Jessie finally got Buster outside and the boys cleaned up and dressed She dumped the wet, muddy clothes and towels on the floor by the washer The kitchen was a disaster The bathroom was a disaster The hall carpet was sopping wet and muddy She hadn’t even finished cleaning up the cereal in the family room and now there was laundry to “What’s for lunch, Jessie?” asked Eric Jessie looked at the clock It was 9:15 She knew it was going to be a long day The author’s purpose was to entertain inform persuade Underline the cause and circle the effect in each statement A Jessie complained about helping, so her mother offered to trade jobs B While Jessie talked on the phone, the bathtub overflowed C Matt and Eric spilled cereal when they tried to make their own breakfast What you think Jessie did next? _ _ _ 31 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Reading a Map Cities in Texas Circle YES or NO YES NO This map shows several large cities in Texas YES NO The map key explains what the symbols mean YES NO Dallas is the capital of Texas YES NO The Rio Grande River is on the border between Texas and New Mexico YES NO The most northern city in Texas shown on this map is San Antonio YES NO Mexico is southwest of Texas YES NO Oklahoma is southeast of Texas YES NO Galveston is south of Houston YES NO The Red River divides Texas from Oklahoma 10 YES NO The map shows the states that border Texas 32 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Spice up Your Life Making delicious-smelling pomander balls is a craft that goes back hundreds of years Write the names of the appropriate items from the list in the blanks to complete the directions for making a pomander ball Some words may be used more than once cheesecloth string or a ribbon whole cloves firm, ripe apple, orange, lemon, or lime ground cinnamon or allspice toothpick wire paperclip Use a _ or small nail to prick small holes in the skin of a _ Gently push a _ into each hole until the entire surface of the fruit is covered Bend a _ into a u-shape Push the tips of the paperclip into the stem of the fruit to make a handle Roll the fruit in _ Cut a square of _ large enough to wrap around the fruit Gather the corners of the _ together around the paperclip Tie it shut tightly with _ Let the fruit dry for two or three weeks in a cool, dark place like a closet where air circulates Prick small holes in the cheesecloth Hang the pomander ball where others can enjoy the delicious aroma 33 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Last Manatee Dies in Miami Zoo Date: Future Officials at the Miami Zoo announced that the last of the gentle, docile manatees died quietly late last night Formerly found in the coastal waters of the southeastern U.S., manatees, also known as sea cows, have now become extinct Large numbers of manatees once roamed the bays and rivers of south Florida, grazing on water plants Since manatees spent most of their time grazing, they provided a useful function by keeping Florida rivers clear of vegetation As their front teeth wore down from constant grinding, they constantly formed new teeth that moved forward to replace the old ones Manatees were large water mammals that lived in either fresh or salt water They grew to be between and 14 feet long and weighed between 600 and 2,000 pounds Most were grayish with a few short hairs scattered over their bodies Their upper lips were divided and fringed with bristles Manatees had rounded tails and paddle-shaped front flippers with nails at the tips of the flippers They used their nails to help gather food Although shaped something like a fish, their tails were horizontal rather than vertical, like fish tails Manatees were helpless out of water Manatees lived alone or in small family groups of 15 to 20 members Female manatees usually had one calf at a time Manatees had small eyes and no external ears Their senses of sight and hearing were poorly developed When swimming, their nostrils could close completely Some scientists believed manatees communicated with each other muzzle to muzzle Manatees had no natural enemies Some were killed by boat propellers in rivers with heavy traffic Some were hunted for their hide, flesh, and oil Schools of manatees became smaller and their range restricted until they could no longer survive in their natural environment According to Dr Johnson, head of an international environmental committee, they could not save the gentle manatee “How many times can the world community allow this type of tragedy to occur?” he asked 34 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Last Manatee Dies in Miami Zoo (cont’d) The author’s purpose was to entertain inform persuade How are a manatee’s teeth unusual? _ _ Underline the cause and circle the effect in this sentence Due to hunting and careless boaters, manatees are in danger of becoming extinct Write T for true or F for false This story, based on facts, is a fictional account of real animals Manatees are extinct Manatees travel in large herds Manatees have poor eyesight Manatees cannot live in fresh water Describe a manatee in your own words _ _ _ 10 Could the events in this story happen in the future? Explain your answer _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 35 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ The Three Stones The three stones in the creek that ran through Wilson’s Woods were similar to all the other stones, except for their exceptionally vivid colors The water gurgled and tumbled over the three stones for many years As time went on, the three stones became smoother as the force of the rushing water wore down their rough edges In the summertime when the creek was low, the three stones showed off their lovely colors to the children who came to wade in the cool, clear water They liked being admired for their gorgeous colors as they relaxed on the sandy creek bottom One summer, the weather turned very hot and dry The creek dried up The three stones missed the refreshing water bubbling over them The dry, dusty air dulled their brilliant colors No one came to the dried creek to admire the three stones “No one will notice us now,” complained the largest stone “All those years of keeping ourselves polished have been wasted,” grumbled the second largest stone “Perhaps now that the creek has dried up, it’s time for us to make a change,” suggested the smallest stone “A change?” challenged the largest stone “Why should we change?” “We are beautiful creek stones,” said the second largest stone “That’s all we have ever been Now that the creek has dried up, we cannot even be that anymore.” “Perhaps we could go back to Stone School and learn to be something else,” suggested the smallest stone “Something else!” exclaimed the largest stone “No way.” “But we’ve been creek stones for thousands of years,” protested the second largest stone “We don’t know how to be something else.” “Perhaps it’s not too late to learn something new.” 36 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ The Three Stones (cont’d) The two larger stones considered the smallest stone’s idea They talked long into the night and into the next day They argued back and forth Should they take a chance? Finally they agreed They knew their best attributes were their brilliant colors and smoothness They decided that whatever they became, they wanted to remain together That fall the three stones returned to Stone School They studied very hard and spent hours in the library checking out possibilities In spring, when they graduated, they were ready to return to the world The three stones decided not to take a chance on Mother Nature again Instead they moved into an indoor goldfish pond at a children’s hospital From then on, they always had plenty of company Their beautiful colors and smoothness brought pleasure to many young people What lesson did the three stones learn? Don’t trust Mother Nature Even stones have feelings It’s never too late to learn something new Underline the cause and circle the effect in this sentence The creek dried up because of the long, dry spell Suggest two other “careers” the three stones might have chosen _ _ What is meant by the words, “The three stones decided not to take a chance on Mother Nature again.” _ Complete the cluster with words from the story that describe the water in the stream before it dried up water 37 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Spies in the Skies Did you know that both the North and South used spies in the skies during the Civil War? No, they didn’t have satellites orbiting Earth or even spy planes In fact, the Wright brothers didn’t fly their first airplane until nearly 40 years after the Civil War ended So how could they have aerial surveillance without airplanes? President Abraham Lincoln named Thaddeus Lowe as Chief Aeronaut of the Army of the Potomac in 1861 Lowe recruited other aeronauts, people who flew hot air balloons, to spy on Confederate troops He and his airship crew made over 3,000 flights into Confederate territory From the air, an observer could get a much fuller picture of the scene below, including numbers and placement of troops According to his memoirs, Lowe’s observations from a hydrogen balloon at the Battle of Fair Oaks in May, 1862 provided vital information which narrowly averted a Union defeat Hot air balloons were expensive to make, and the Confederacy was always short of money and supplies They had plenty of cotton, but cotton was not a good material for hot air balloons The cost of silk, the best material for balloons, was too expensive The Confederates overcame this problem by sewing together pieces of silk from dresses donated by Southern women to make a balloon Despite the advantages of air surveillance, many generals were not convinced of its value Because the Air Corps was expensive to maintain, it was discontinued in 1863, two years before the war finally ended What does aerial mean? _ What does surveillance mean? _ What is an aeronaut? _ The author’s purpose was to entertain inform persuade Write F for fact or O for Opinion Aeronauts were people who flew hot air balloons Aeronauts were very brave Silk is more expensive than cotton Having an air corps was worth the expense 38 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Character Traits Character traits are qualities a person or character possesses, like bravery, truthfulness, fear, kindness, or loneliness (Character traits not include physical attributes, like age, height, weight, hair or skin color.) List three character traits for one of the main characters in a book or story you’ve read Give examples that show when or how the character displayed this trait Character trait: _ Example: Character trait: _ Example: Character trait: _ Example: 39 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ Analyzing Changes in a Character In the left column, list two character traits for the main character in a story or book you’ve read Write examples from the story that explain what the character was like at the beginning of the story In the right column, list two character traits for the main character at the end of the story Write examples that explain what the character was like at the end of the story e At th End e At th ing inn Beg Character trait: Character trait: Example: _ Example: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Character trait: Character trait: Example: _ Example: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ How or why did these changes take place? _ _ _ 40 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Answer Key Belling the Cat, page 11 Proposing a plan is easier than putting into action and Answers will vary A Letter from Plimoth Plantation, pages 12–13 realistic fiction Storehouse to keep supplies and meeting house for worship (also used as hospital) farmed, hunted, cut trees, chopped logs, built homes Cooked, churned butter, milked the goat, hoed the garden Answer will vary One Hump or Two?, pages 20–21 Camels are well suited to desert life They have wide feet with thick pads to store food Dromedary The Legend of King Arthur, pages 18–19 To protect him because he believed Merlin’s prophesy b a covered with created, prepared removing the sword from the anvil to entertain Cause: he was in a hurry to help Sir Kay Effect: Arthur pulled the sword from the anvil Answers will vary ✓ ✓ ✓ Sharp teeth Long neck Travels up to 100 miles a day ✓ ✓ Carries up to 1,000 pounds ✓ ✓ ✓ Its milk is made into cheese Its hair is woven into cloth Stores food in humps Native to Africa Adapted to life in desert Both ✓ Two humps It’s Perfectly True, pages 14–15 7, 1, 4, 2, 3, 6, –4 Answers will vary Making Candles, page 16 firelight, candles, torches, lanterns (also sunlight, starlight, moonlight) –4 Answers will vary Bactrian Long eyelashes ✓ ✓ Quill Pens, page 23 A Soak a feather in warm water B Dry the feather C Cut the bottom of the feather D Clean out the center E Cut a small slit in the nib berries, vinegar, salt, and food coloring The ink may cause a permanent stain The tip of the quill pen Ben’s Best Friend, pages 24–25 Ben missed his best friend, Rufus His dog had died Rufus kept Ben’s secrets He made Ben feel safe when it stormed –6 Answers will vary 41 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Answer Key The State Quarters Program, page 27 1999 2008 five Order is based on date of admission as a state 1788 Answer depends on current year 1912 to 1959 was a 43-year span Oregon and Arizona –11 Answers will vary The Civil War, pages 28–29 Refer to the map for answers Mom for the Day, pages 30–31 entertain 2A Cause: Jessie complained about helping Effect: Her mother offered to trade jobs 2B Cause: Jessie talked on the phone Effect: The bathtub overflowed 2C Cause: They tried to make their own breakfast Effect: Matt and Eric spilled cereal Answers will vary Reading a Map, page 32 YES YES YES NO NO YES NO YES NO 10 YES Last Manatee Dies in Miami Zoo, pages 34–35 to inform (and persuade) They grow new ones that move forward as the old teeth wear out Cause: Hunting and careless boaters Effect: Manatees are in danger of becoming extinct T F F T F The Three Stones, pages 36–37 It’s never too late to learn something new Cause: the long dry spell Effect: The creek dried up –4 Answers will vary Words could include: gurgled, tumbled, rushing, cool, clear Spies in the Sky, page 38 overhead; in the air spying, watching a person who flies a hot air balloon inform F O F O Spice Up Your Life, page 33 toothpick; firm ripe apple, orange, lemon, or lime clove wire paperclip ground cinnamon or allspice cheesecloth cheesecloth string or ribbon 42 Copyright © 2002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 ... read ii Copyright © 2 002 Milliken Publishing Co MP3462 Reading Comprehension Skills Activities provide opportunities for students in grades and to practice these reading comprehension skills Skill.. .Reading Well 4–5 Milliken s Reading Well reading series provides teachers and parents with a wide variety of activities to use at home or in the classroom to enhance your reading program Reading. .. trrrue 14 Copyright © 2 002 Milliken Publishing Co reproducible MP3462 Name: Date: _ It’s Perfectly True (cont’d) ROOSTER: Cock-a-doodle-doo! Wake up! Three hens
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