Mosaic2 listening speaking

349 300 0
  • Loading ...
1/349 trang
Tải xuống

Thông tin tài liệu

Ngày đăng: 23/04/2017, 01:14

MOSAIC - LISTENING & SPEAKING MOSAIC LISTENING & SPEAKING (Silver Edition) Jami Hanreddy – Elizabeth Whalley Chapter LANGUAGE ANG LEARNING In This Chapter Lecture: To School or Not to School Learning strategy: Listening for Main Ideas Language Function: Requesting the Main Point “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” —Mark Twain U.S humorist and novelist (1835-1910) Connecting to the Topic Do you feel you would know less, the same amount, or more if you had not gone to school? Why? If you hadn't gone to school, how would your life be different? Do you think everyone should be required to go to school? Why or why not? For how many years? Part 1: Building Background Knowledge Did You Know? - High school students in the United States spend an average of 38 hours per week at school In the Middle East, this average ranges from 30-40 hours In Russia the figure is 52 hours, in Korea it's 55, and in Japan it's 59 hours - Around the world, reading, writing, and arithmetic are often considered the most important school subjects for young children In the United States, these three skills are sometimes referred to as the "Three Rs: Reading, 'Riting, and 'Rithmetic." However, many people think that there would be many fewer high school dropouts and an increase in college admissions, especially for economically underprivileged students, if the "Three Rs" were changed to: Rigor—making sure all students are given a challenging curriculum that prepares them for college or work Relevance—making sure kids have courses and projects that clearly relate to their lives and their goals Relationships—making sure kids have a number of adults who know them, look out for them, and push them to achieve - The number of children currently being home-schooled (taught completely at home by their parents) in the United States is over 1.2 million and is growing steadily What Do You Think? Discuss the following questions in pairs How many hours per week high school students in your native country spend at school? Do you think this is too little, too much, or just right? Why? Which one of the groups of the “Three Rs” (Reading, ‘Riting, and ‘Rithmetic or Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships) you think provides better building blocks for a philosophy of education? Why? What might the advantages of home-schooling be? Would homeschooling have worked well for you? Why or why not?  Sharing Your Experience Recollecting School Experiences Think back to the time when you were in elementary school and share your recollections in small groups Use the questions below to guide your discussion Who was your favorite teacher? Why was he or she your favorite? How old were you? Share a specific incident that explains why you liked that teacher so well Who was your least favorite teacher? Why? How old were you? Share an anecdote that explains why you disliked this teacher In what ways has school been exciting for you? Disappointing? Vocabulary Preview Determining Meaning from Context The following words are used in the lecture After the list are seven statements that teachers might make to describe students Complete each statement with the appropriate word from the list Compare your answers with your classmates' answers Words Definitions enthusiastic extremely pleased or excited genius a person with great intelligence and/or ability to get away from it to retreat from the stress of daily activities all very capable and inventive; talented gifted frequently appearing disagreeable, unpleasant, or sad to moody others nonconformist a person who refuses to follow established customs obedient follows orders In nursery school, Rudy Thomas could sing his ABCS on key without missing a note He played the piano without being taught He made up beautiful songs by hirn8elf By the time he was six, he must have spent six hundred hours at the piano He probably will be a great composer or performer one day, because he is musically _ Sometimes Veronica Michaels is happy, but more often, she seems sad or grumpy She is so _ that it is difficult for her to make any friends I think Justin Torres is the kind of student that many teachers like He does whatever he is told without a8king any questions and never gets into trouble I however, find this kind of student difficult I don't like students who are so _ I much prefer students who challenge me Nancy Burke s IQ is over 165 She completed high school by the time she was 12 years old She graduated with 1nghest honors from the university when she was 16 and completed her Ph.D in astrophysic8 at age 21 Her parents say that by the time she was three months old, they could already tell that she was a _ It's so nice to have Asem Al Sultan in class He is always cheerful and seems to like everyone It's clear that he really enjoys school because he is so _ about all the classes and activities I think that Young Joo Park i8 working too hard I know she has her TOEFL exam next week, but she needs _ and relax a little or she might get sick Instead of doing term papers for her political science class, Anne Kovacs usually creates some sort of dance performance that illustrates her main arguments and includes all the supporting details She is really a _ I’m surprised the professor allows her to change the course requirements in that way Part Understanding Main Ideas Strategy Listening for Main Ideas in a Lecture In most lectures, several main ideas are presented These are the concepts the speaker wants the audience to remember Most often, the lecturer also provides a general statement, called the thesis statement, which identifies the overall purpose or argument of the lecture When a lecturer is not well organized or is long-winded, taking a long time to come to the point, understanding the gist, or general idea, of what is being said can be difficult However, when a lecturer is well organized, and the lecture has a clear beginning, middle, and end, you will have three chances to pick out the main ideas in the introduction, body, and conclusion Introduction Most often a good lecturer will begin with a statement that grabs the audience's attention and stimulates interest in the topic This opening is followed by some background information and then a thesis statement Sometimes, the main ideas are mentioned in the thesis statement but are not fully explained Body The main ideas and examples supporting the thesis are presented here If you didn't catch what the thesis was in the Introduction, you might be able to figure it out from the main ideas and supporting details Conclusion The conclusion most often begins with a restatement of the thesis followed by a brief summary of the main points supporting the thesis This provides another chance to confirm your understanding of the thesis and main supporting points This section often ends with a concluding statement that stimulates interest in further exploration of the topic or other related topics, which should serve as a further hint about the main points Before You Listen Considering the Topic Discuss the following questions in small groups Think about your classmates during your first eight years of school Which ones had artistic talent? Did those students like or dislike school? Why? Think about your classmates who were talented in science or math Did those students like or dislike school? Why? Based on your group discussion, can you draw any conclusions? Share your findings with the rest of the class Listen Listen to the lecture once all the way through Then listen again The second time, listen for the main ideas in the introduction, the body, and the conclusion of the lecture, stop the recording after you hear each of the following sentences and write the main idea of the part of the lecture that you have just heard Stop These questions are very important for you as future teachers to consider ………………………………………… ………………………………………… Stop Mark Twain, Charlie Chaplin, and Vincent van Gogh are examples of what we expect to find ………………………………………… ………………………………………… Stop He did well in math, history, and literature courses and felt he had a free and happy life at school.  ………………………………………… ………………………………………… Stop Even though these scientific giants experienced conflicts between the demands of school and the development of their own minds, we should not jump to conclusions ………………………………………… ………………………………………… Stop He passed his medical school entrance examinations with higher marks than any other student ………………………………………… ………………………………………… Listening for Details With a partner, answer the questions and complete the statements below about details supporting the main points in the lecture Listen to the lecture again if necessary What kinds of people seem to need to “get away from it all” to their work? ………………………………… ………………………………… Are Mark Twain, Charlie Chaplin, and Vincent van Gogh examples of creative people who loved school or hated school? ………………………………… ………………………………… What did Martha Graham, Maria Tallchief, and William Wordsworth all have in common? ………………………………… ………………………………… Why did Thomas Edison’s early teachers think he was strage? ………………………………… ………………………………… Who was Edison’s main teacher? ………………………………… ………………………………… What two things did Edison love doing as a child? ………………………………… ………………………………… What did Charles Darwin and Edison have in common? ………………………………… ………………………………… Einstein compares being in school to Me as a ………………………………… ………………………………… Marie Curie discovered……… and invented……… in spite of not having very good ………………………………… ………………………………… 10 Lillian Moller Gilbreth was one of the founders of ………………………………… ………………………………… 11 What did Alexander Fleming have in common with Curie and Gilbreth? ………………………………… ………………………………… 12 What did Fleming, Curie, and Gilbreth have in common with all of the other people mentioned in the lecture? ………………………………… ………………………………… After You Listen Evaluating a Lecturer's style Discuss the following questions about the lecture in small groups Do you think the lecture was well organized? Poorly organized? Why? Was the lecturer long-winded and taking too much time to get to the point? Did the lecturer ever get to the point? Comparing Notes In the same small groups, share the main ideas that you wrote down in Activity Did you find it easy or difficult to pick out the main ideas? Why? Talk It Over Sharing Your English Language Learning Autobiography Think about the variety of experiences you've had as you've been learning English Begin with the point at which you didn't know a single word and continue through the present In small groups, use the following questions as a guide to present your "English autobiography." Speak for two to three minutes As you listen to your classmates' autobiographies, write down the main points When were you first exposed to English? How old were you? Where were you when you first began to learn English? Have you been learning English continuously since then, or were you interrupted for some reason? Did you study English in school? If so, where and when? What approaches or methods did your teachers use? Were any of your teachers native English speakers? Do you think this made a difference? Why or why not? Have you had opportunities to speak English outside the classroom with friends or family? Have you had a close boyfriend or girlfriend or perhaps a husband or wife who spoke English? RA: Oh! I see what the problem is James, in Mohammed’s culture, if you show someone the bottoms of your feet, it is a great insult James: Oh, OK I didn’t mean anything insulting by that I was just comfortable with my feet up while we were chatting I can move my feet Not a problem Mohammed: OK then James: Yes, but the question really is, is that enough? I don’t know enough about Mohammed’s culture and I’m afraid that I’ll something wrong again, at least from his point of view RA: OK, then If there were a lecture on Middle Eastern culture or perhaps a discussion group where you could discuss your feelings about this, would you be willing to go? James: Sure, but shouldn’t Mohammed have to learn about my culture, too? But I don’t think there are any lectures or discussion groups about my culture RA: Yes, you’re right It’s difficult to find such a thing about the majority culture I have an idea though Would you and Mohammed be willing to begin a cross-cultural discussion group? Mohammed: Yes, I would be very interested in that James: Yeah, me too RA: OK, then In the meantime, I think you guys should give being roommates another month If there are still problems after a month, we can see about changing roommates What you think? James and Mohammed: I’m willing to go along with that OK, let’s try it Part Focus On Testing Listening for Classroom Interaction Professor: Let me review what will be on the final exam next Monday The exam will definitely cover the history of the conflicts in South Asia, in the Middle East, and in Northern Ireland I’m not sure whether it will also cover the conflicts in Africa Sorry I can’t say for sure, but I just have to see how long the rest of the exam is Unless you’d like to add another hour to the exam time and have an extra-long one Students: No! No, please Come on! Professor: You will be responsible for everything we’ve covered in lectures and discussion sections as well as the readings, of course In addition, you will be responsible for the class presentations your classmates made I see a hand up here Student 1: Yeah What kinds of questions will there be? Professor: The first part will be definitions, either in a matching format or short answer I don’t know because I haven’t written it yet The second part will be true/false and short-answer, and the third part will be an essay in which you have to synthesize the concepts we’ve covered so far You’ll have to take a point of view and defend your position with specific examples Question? Student 2: Short-answer and an essay? Really? Professor: That’s right Life is cruel Students: [laughter] Student 3: You mean the essay will cover all the concepts we’ve studied? We have to put them all together? Professor: Well, not all of them That would be pretty hard to Let me just say that I’ll give you very specific directions about what to cover But you’ll have to wait until the exam to find out which concepts m target Student 4: Can we ask you questions now about the material? Professor: Let’s hang on a minute and see whether there are any more questions about the format of the exam Anyone? OK, I guess I’ll take content questions for uh a couple of minutes Yes? Student 2: I was wondering about the effects of deforestation It shows up over and over again in my notes, but I have to say I just don’t see the point If you don’t have forests you have conflict? Professor: I wouldn’t put it that way, but think about the regions we’ve been discussing A lot of them are in the sub-tropical desert belts between about ten degrees of latitude and 30 degrees Rain is not very common in many of these places Still, these are societies that traditionally built a lot of things from wood, burned wood for cooking, and so on People use up all the wood, cut down all the forests, and then what happens? Student 1: No ram? Professor: There wouldn’t have been much ram anyway Look deeper And what effect would sparse rainfall have on the forests? Student 4: They can’t grow back very fast Professor: Exactly And then all these people who need wood to live as they have always lived are scrambling for access to the few remaining trees Conflict! This is a good clue to what you should focus on as you study Which factors influenced events and how? Think about geography, culture, religion, minerals, soil resources, all sorts of factors Narrator: Question 1: Which topic may or may not be on the final exam? Question 2: Which of the following is not mentioned by the professor as a possible source for material on the exam? Question 3: listen again to part of the exchange Student 3: You mean the essay will cover all the concepts we’ve studied? We have to put them all together? Professor: Well., not all of them That would be pretty hard to Let me just say that I’ll give you very specific directions about what to cover But you’ll have to wait until the exam to find out which concepts I’ll target Narrator: What is the male student’s concern about the essay? Question 4: Listen again to part of the exchange Student 2: Short-answer and an essay? Really? Professor: That’s right Life is cruel Students: [laughter] Narrator: Which of the following best states the meaning of the professor’s comment, “Life is cruel?” Question 5: Listen again to part of the exchange Student 4: Can we ask you questions now about the material? Professor: Let’s hang on a minute and see whether there are any more questions about the format of the exam Anyone? OK, I guess m take content questions for uh a couple of minutes Yes? Narrator: Why does the professor ask the female student to wait? Question 6: listen again to part of the exchange Professor: I wouldn’t put it that way, but think about the regions we’ve been discussing A lot of them are in the sub-tropical desert belts between about ten degrees of latitude and 30 degrees Rain is not very common in many of these places Still, these are societies that traditionally built a lot of things from wood, burned wood for cooking, and so on People use up all the wood, cut down all the forests, and then what happens? Student 1: No ram? Professor: There wouldn’t have been much rain anyway Look deeper And what effect would sparse rainfall have on the forests? Student 4: They can’t grow back very fast Professor: Exactly And then all these people who need wood to live as they have always lived are scrambling for access to the few remaining trees Conflict Narrator: Which of the following best describes the situation? Vocabulary Index Chapter acquisition admissions beat around the bush dropouts enthusiastic exposed to gazillions genius get away from it all gifted gist home-schooled inventive long-winded moody nonconformist obedient patent clerk relevance rigor underprivilege Chapter daredevil destination fame and fortune freediving hullabaloo irresistible motivate participants publicity pull off seeker self-esteem spectators straightjacket stunt take up thrilling Chapter adolescence anthropologist confirmation elaborate equilibrium fasting humiliation indifferent infected isolation navel ordeal plague promotion prosperous puberty retirement rituals suitor tribal Chapter ambiguity beside the point by and large catch your eye com the term consumer create a stir crux cutting-edge enhance eye opener hammer a point home haven’t the foggiest illustrious infamous insinuate ploy referent repel reside in sassy shamelessly slip one’s mind split second streamlined subliminal widget Chapter add insult to injury at the drop of a hat beat around the bush driven free associate in a rut innovators intimidate laws of irony make a name for yourself motives obsolescence passion pull your own strings put it bluntly sound and fury whine Chapter avalanche bureaucracy chaotic conceptualize fleeting flexibility gripe session imprint in tune with manipulate optimistic perception pessimistic REM sleep rhinoceros straightforward the downside the upside trivial virtual reality visualize Chapter assemble consensus consultant dispute enticing give in individualism initiative innovation interdependence mental challenge persuade productivity quota top dollar unanimous unappealing Chapter bleed butter someone up chaos theory compliment cosmos flattery ideological matter metaphysical meteorologist offensive paradigm quantum mechanics relative relativity such and such suspicious turbulence wild goose chase Chapter accompaniment acoustic bias boo cellist censorship contemporary enhance harmonies hillbilly indifferent musicologist nostalgically outrageous rare reaffirm segregation singles the blues Chapter 10 arousal state asterisk big picture chill out contingency cool off generate give-and-take honor integrated negotiation old hat rage resident advisor slang trial balloon verbalize well intentioned CONTENTS Chapter Language and Learning Chapter Danger and Daring Chapter Gender and Relationships Chapter Aesthetics and Beauty Chapter Transitions Chapter The Mind Chapter Working Chapter Breakthroughs Chapter Art and Entertainment Chapter 10 Conflict and Resolution -// - MOSAIC LISTENING & SPEAKING Silver Edition Jami Hanreddy – Elizabeth Whalley Lawrence J.Zwier: Contributor, Focus on Testing Jami Hanreddy: Listening/Speaking Strand Leader NHÀ XUẤT BẢN McGRAW-HILL NHÀ XUẤT BẢN TỔNG HỢP TP.HCM 62 Nguyễn Thị Minh Khai, Q.1 Chịu trách nhiệm xuất bản: NGUYỄN THỊ THANH HƯƠNG Biên tập: NGUYỄN LIÊN In lần thứ nhất, số lượng 2.000 Khổ 20 x 25cm Tại Công ty Cổ phần in Khuyến Học Phía Nam Địa chỉ: 128/7 Trần Quốc Thảo, Q.3, TP.HCM GPXB số: 808-09/CXB/33-112/THTPHCM ngày 08/9/2009 In xong nộp lưu chiểu tháng 12/2009 ... introduced in this chapter How comfortable you feel using these skills? Very comfortable Listening for main ideas Listening for details Some Not what all comfortable comfortable at Evaluating a speaker's... people? − Rich people or poor people? − A visitor in a foreign country or a person at home? Listening Listening to Note Specific Details Listen to the beginning of the lecture about people who... you trying to say? So, what's the/your point? What are you driving at? What are you getting at? Listening for Appropriate Expressions and Tone of Voice In the following conversations, you will
- Xem thêm -

Xem thêm: Mosaic2 listening speaking , Mosaic2 listening speaking , Mosaic2 listening speaking , Part 3. Requesting the Main Point, Part 3. Saying Yes and No, Part 3. Admitting a Lack of Knowledge, Part 3. “Telling It Like It Is”, Part 3. Expressing the Positive View, Part 3. Persuading and Giving In, Part 2. When You Don't Understand the Concepts, Part 3. Giving and Receiving Compliments, Part 2. Distinguishing Between Fact and Opinion, Part 3. Acquiescing and Expressing Reservations

Mục lục

Xem thêm

Gợi ý tài liệu liên quan cho bạn

Nhận lời giải ngay chưa đến 10 phút Đăng bài tập ngay