IT training the grocer TruePDF 16 march 2019

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16 MARCH 2019 GUIDE TO PACKAGING THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING ANALYSIS PACKAGING GETS CRACKING This constantly evolving sector is pulling out all the stops to ensure its solutions are not just good for the planet but also for the brand, Johanna Thomson reports l 16 March 2019 l www.thegrocer.co.uk AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER There are very few areas of grocery – or any other industry for that matter – that have to tick so many diverse boxes in order to survive Not only does packaging have to be attractive, it also has to be practical in terms of supply chain, be sustainable and help sell the product The use or overuse of plastics is still high on the packaging agenda and even after the horrific images of the sea of plastic seen on Blue Planet, the use of packaging is still growing It is estimated there are over 150 million tonnes of plastic in the world’s oceans and every year one million birds and over 100,000 sea mammals die from eating and getting tangled in plastic waste A recent report estimates that plastic in the sea is set to treble by 2025 Something has to change So, in December, the government announced the launch of a £60m innovation fund to accelerate the development of sustainable plastic packaging The funding, to be bolstered by industry support, and delivered by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund Businesses will be able to access this funding through UKRI managed competitions to meet the challenge of developing smart sustainable plastic packaging But how can retailers help in the battle against plastic while still meeting health and safety regs and consumers’ demand for convenience? “Retailers are finding themselves in a perfect storm of media coverage, grassroot consumer and NGO campaigns and governmental changes, all driving a desire to reduce plastic and provide more sustainable packaging options,” says Erik Lindroth, sustainability director, Tetra Pak North Europe “For supermarkets, packaging isn’t something that can change overnight, but they can start to consider the wider picture when it comes to the food they stock or package themselves Solutions that will help to keep products tasting great and protect the goodness within, but that are low-plastic, recyclable, and still convenient for consumer use.” This shift in mindset is already AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER For supermarkets, ❝ packaging isn’t something that can be changed over night ❞ happening and Tetra Pak cites a Budgens in North London that has become the first supermarket in Britain to introduce a plastic-free zone Waitrose is now selling tomatoes in punnets made of leaves and Iceland has an Indian microwave meal range packaged in plant-based paper pots rather than plastic food trays “There is no simple answer,” adds Lindroth “Limiting plastic usage must be complemented by actions to address the overall environmental impact – like ensuring it comes from sustainable sources, and that once recycled, it can be turned into new products.” CONTENTS Coveris: Driving sustainable change across paper and plastic FSC: UK charity that advises on the use of forest-based materials Tetra Pak: Committed to ‘protecting what’s good’ Klöckner Pentaplast: The top user of recyclable plastics 10 Noluma: Proves that protected packaging pays 12 Pro Carton: Explains why cartons offer the solutions 14 Ulma: The driving force in packaging advancements 18 This supplement to The Grocer was published by: William Reed Business Media Ltd, Broadfield Park, Crawley, West Sussex RH11 9RT Tel: 01293 613400 Editor: Johanna Thomson Designer: Amber Stoddart Printers: St Ives © William Reed Business Media Ltd For Pro Carton the important thing is to reduce the amount of non-sustainable packaging and wasteful packaging “Every time I walk around a supermarket I see plenty of examples of products that could be packaged in more sustainable materials,” says Tony Hitchin, general manager “Whilst many brand owners and retailers are tackling the issue with gusto there are still lots of opportunities for change “According to our research, 89% of UK consumers would choose to shop at a supermarket or retailer that proactively encouraged more environmentally friendly packaging from its suppliers, so it is in the interests of retailers to respond to public opinion.” It requires both an end-to-end approach and the need to consider food waste and the packaging/plastics postconsumer phase, believes Coveris Adam Robinson, Pack Positive centre manager, explains: “Simplification of materials, package size reduction, component reduction, pushing combined pack and fixture design all offer significant opportunities to support packaging reduction whilst still meeting the core roles that packaging has always played.” CHANGING MINDS It is fair to say that it must work both ways when it comes to reducing waste and it is not just up to packaging producers and retailers – consumers have to alter their expectations too The 5p charge on plastic bags has been a phenomenal success and proves that, whether we like it or not, money talks It is now quite normal to see shoppers pulling out old plastic bags or using a bag-forlife at the till It is no longer seen as being a cheapskate, it’s seen as responsible Pro Carton carried out a Packaging Perceptions consumer research study that suggested shoppers would pay a small premium for more environmentally-friendly packaging “Over 5000 of the 7000 people we interviewed said they would be prepared to pay more if the packaging was more environmentally friendly,” says Hitchin “Clearly, attitude and behaviour may differ, but it shows the strength ❯❯❯ www.thegrocer.co.uk l 16 March 2019 l THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING ANALYSIS ❯❯❯ of feeling on the issue.” To get past the initial intuitive, emotional and embedded responses consumers have to product and packaging, they need to take a more considered view according to Coveris Robinson adds: “Providing consistent, correct easily understood information about packaging, the role it plays, its recyclability and broader sustainability factors is critical to this.” Tetra Pak is of the opinion that consumer behaviours are shifting in tandem with packaging and retailer’s efforts “Consumers expect their food and drink to be consistent in taste, colour, texture and nutritional value,” Lindroth “While retailers’ priorities have been to provide this in the most convenient and costefficient way possible, there is now more pressure to ensure these packages are sustainable, and for consumers to think about the impact their waste has on the environment Consumer behaviours are therefore shifting in tandem, as interest in ‘doing their bit’ to help the environment becomes more front of mind.” KEY TRENDS Unsurprisingly, all packaging producers agree that the main trend is towards sustainable packaging formats Labelling on pack to inform shoppers about the recycling credentials of a product are also becoming increasingly important FSC Rosie Teasdale, executive director, says: “The vast majority of consumers are now saying they want information on-pack and demand more information about the environmental status and implications of their products and packaging “However, there is also a perception that companies don’t communicate honestly about their environmental and social responsibility Therefore, independent certification adds credibility to ethical and environmental claims It’s likely, therefore, that we’ll see an increase in the number and prominence of certification labels on pack “Using FSC-certified packaging ensure that you are not contributing to global deforestation and trust in FSC is high A global survey found that 82% l 16 March 2019 l www.thegrocer.co.uk of FSC-certified companies agree that FSC certification helps them to create a positive corporate image The FSC label and associated marketing assets enable businesses to communicate about their responsible sourcing of paper, board and other forest-based products and packaging in a way that is both meaningful and attractive.” Due the limited options for films that are recyclable in the UK, Polyethylene Film (PE Film) that is defined as recyclable with an On Pack Recycling Label, is expected to grow This is driven by impending changes to UK Producer Responsibility taxation and the UK Plastics Pact along with consumer pressure There is also an ongoing interest in compostable materials “But it remains to be seen whether this becomes a trend due to the lack of post-consumer collection and composting infrastructure,” says Coveris’ Robinson “We also see increased interest in our paperboard products as retailers look to reduce the level of rigid plastic packaging across their product range.” Fast food is also moving into more paper-based solutions and the grocery trade is doing likewise Pro Carton’s Hitchin says: “We expect to see more mono materials and also an increase in the development and adoption of biobased barrier materials made from plants rather than fossil-based polymers.” For over 10 years leading plastics manufacturer Klöckner Pentaplast (KP) has been at the forefront of sustainable packaging with solutions made from 100% post-consumer recycled PET, (rPET) Dr Helene Roberts, MD of UK and Australia says: “Since 2009, our UK site in Featherstone has been delivering rPET solutions that can be further recycled, so thereby supporting a circular economy All the PET used is now from post consumer sources By investing in technology that cleans curbside collected PET material and comply with all the food regs, KP stands now as the top user of recycled plastic within the packaging industry in the UK In 2018 KP used over 140.000 tonnes of PCR globally, supporting a plastic economy that creates value and keeps plastic away from the oceans.” It’s likely that ❝ we’ll see an increase in the number of certification labels on pack ❞ AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER FINDING SOLUTIONS So instead of talking about the problems what are the solutions? Packaging is vital and can make or break a product The laminated paperboard sandwich pack is a prime example of packaging driving forward supply-chain performance and efficiency alongside consumer preference Coveris’ Robinson explains: “The pack helped reposition and premiumise the food-to-go sandwich market, fuelling its ongoing growth, this was achieved in parallel by delivering P+3 shelf life, supporting supply-chain efficiencies and reduced food waste This pack format is currently designated as widely recyclable and will go through further innovation to meet revised requirements from the UK paper recycling sector between now and 2022.” Protecting the produce is the primary AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER purpose of packaging and without finding solutions to provide protection can directly effect the success of a product Noluma’s work with Jersey Girls Dairy, a dairy farm based in Vermont USA, is a great example of how introducing lightprotected packaging not only improves quality for consumers, but can also provide a real boost to sales Chris Pickles, MD at Ulma Packaging UK, says: “Jersey Girls was concerned when they found out that the packaging transporting the milk from farm to customer was not protecting it from the damage caused by light – both real and artificial Unless light is blocked by purpose-made light-protected packaging, it can have a significant negative impact on the taste and nutritional content of milk So the Jersey Girls partnered with Noluma to measure the light-protection of its packaging and advise on the devel- opment of a container that would fully protect its farm-fresh milk “Through this partnership, Jersey Girls launched a new light-protected bottle, certified with a Noluma logo The campaign resulted in Jersey Girls’ sales tripling in just two weeks.” Black plastic is one of the most problematic forms of plastic to recycle The reason for this is that the method used to colour the plastic means it can’t be recognised by the sorting systems used in most recycling plants So why is it so difficult to cut down on the use of black plastic? Coveris explains this is simply due to it being the most efficient, consistent, resilient and cost-effective way to universally frame a product “It requires a broader, more considered, more bespoke, and typically more expensive approach to product and packaging design to deliver equivalent performance,” says Robinson “It is more important than ever that packaging design is considered at a parallel, concurrent stage in the product development process to enable the level of consideration required to address the complex issues we face, the use of black plastic being but one.” Greenpeace are calling on a ban black plastic and other “problem plastics” by the end of 2019 So there are still more challenges on the horizon but this resilient and creative sector is more than well-equipped to rise to it The government’s £60m innovation fund hopes to help develop new forms of packaging and plastic made from farming, food and industrial waste, like sugar beet, wood chippings and food waste – moving away from oil-based plastics There are plans for smart packaging labels – which could tell consumers the right bin to put recycling into and revolutionise the way recycling is sorted in waste plants Live sell-by-date patches are also being discussed – a living sell-by-date which deteriorates at the same rate as produce to show consumers when their food is going off therefore cutting down on food waste So watch this space as packaging continues to problem solve there will be ■ some fascinating innovations www.thegrocer.co.uk l 16 March 2019 l THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING COVERIS PLASTIC AND PAPER SOLUTIONS DETAILS Coveris UK HQ: Holland Place Spalding Lincolnshire PE11 3ZN UK@coveris.com www.coveris.co.uk KEY CONTACTS Gary Rehwinkel UK President Mark Summers Film Sales Director Jo Ormrod Paper & Board Sales Director Adam Robinson Pack Positive Centre Manager KEY BRANDS PE+ and OPE recyclable films Freshlife films High-performance functional films and laminates Self-adhesive and linerless labels Cartonboard and hybrid laminate board Positioned to drive sustainable change, Coveris, one of Europe’s largest manufacturers of both plastic and paper packaging solutions, recently launched its Pack Positive sustainability strategy, in line with its UK Plastics Pact commitments, to deliver four leading industry targets; elimination of problematic or unnecessary single-use packaging; 100% recyclable plastic packaging by 2025; 30% recyclate plastic content by 2022; 20% food waste reduction by 2025 Having launched a first of its kind Pack Positive sustainable development centre and academic partnership with Leeds Beckett University’s Retail Institute, Adam Robinson, Pack Positive centre manager explains how the new facility is set to deliver the sustainable packaging of the future “Through its vertically integrated innovation and manufacturing model, Coveris is in a unique industry position to drive sustainable change across plastics and paper packaging.” “Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and eliminating single-use plastics from the supply-chain, Coveris is focused on new and innovative ways to reduce and ‘design out’ unnecessary plastics, supporting the use of paper and board alternatives where there is no compromise to food safety, shelf-life or product protection Having recently worked with M&S to replace traditional rigid and black plastic sushi packs with sustainably sourced board, the packs provide a more widely l 16 March 2019 l www.thegrocer.co.uk recyclable solution whilst delivering added-value brand positioning Coveris is ❝ in a unique industry position to drive sustainable change across plastics and paper packaging ❞ 100% RECYCLABLE PLASTICS Launched across several major retail lines including Co-op prepared vegetables and Tesco organic salads, Coveris’ PE+ films provide a leading alternative to other not yet recyclable UK plastics like OPP Delivering the same protective, functional and shelf-life benefits as existing solutions, the mono film is easily recycled in the same way that you would recycle a carrier bag in larger stores Supported by ongoing R&D into extrusion and material science, recyclable PE solutions are being developed for more complex materials like laminates and barrier films 30% RECYCLATE CONTENT Operating its own circular production model, Coveris are responsible for recycling over 6,000 tonnes of post-manufacturer and post-processer plastic waste, and 6,500 tonnes of paper by-product waste each year With this being reprocessed by Coveris for secondary packaging reuse, they are also leading the research and development of post-consumer recyclate content to meet 2022 legislative requirements 20% FOOD WASTE REDUCTION Despite food waste targets having seemingly moved down the ‘sustainable agenda’, this remains key to Coveris’ Pack Positive strategy for a sustainable future Targeting a 20% reduction in line with Courtauld 2025, Coveris have recently been awarded for their work in this field for their Freshlife MAP film for Tesco and Waitrose avocados Scientifically developed in partnership with fruit and vegetable supplier Greencell, the packs deliver at least +2 days shelf-life and a 25% quality improvement in ripe and ready-to-eat avocados, significantly reducing instore waste, improving consumer satisfaction ■ and product availability AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING FSC PACKED WITH IDEAS DETAILS Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) UK The Billiard Room Town Hall Llanidloes Powys SY18 6BN 01686413916 info@fsc-uk.org www.fsc-uk.org KEY CONTACTS Tallulah Chapman Communications Manager Beth Bennett Business Development Manager The world of packaging is in flux and those in the industry are working hard to rethink and reform their products Testament to this is the recordbreaking visitor numbers at the NEC’s Packaging Innovations 2019 The show was buzzing and nowhere more so than on the stand of the Forest Stewardship Counci (FSC) UK, a UK charity that helps businesses procure and supply products, packaging and other forest-based materials from responsible sources Paper-based packaging can protect goods, provide product information and be both biodegradable and easily recyclable Rosie Teasdale, executive director says: “However, forest-based materials such as these can also be the product of deforestation or poor forestry practices: a threat not only to the world’s forests but also to business and brand reputation Paper ❝ packaging protects, provides information, can be biodegradable and easily recyclable ❞ “Through responsible management of forests, the FSC certification system can help to secure a long-term source of paper and other forest-based products FSC can enable you to demonstrate your commitment to responsible forestry to your customers.” Packaging can carry the FSC label if it is produced using FSC-certified materials under a valid FSC chain of custody certificate Including the FSC label on packaging is a great way to capitalise on one of its key functions: promotion This is particularly important in packaging and other applications where sustainability can be a key differentiator Brands that use FSC-labelled packaging can be granted authorisation to promote it using the iconic FSC trademarks under an FSC trademark licence, thus facilitating online, offline and in-store promo■ tions FSC® CERTIFIED PACKAGING DOES MORE THAN LOOK AFTER YOUR PRODUCTS, IT LOOKS AFTER OUR FORESTS TOO Our forests give us many things, including the packaging for some of our favourite products FSC helps look after forests and the people and wildlife who call them home So you can choose paper, board and other forest products while keeping our forests full of life Choose FSC FSC®F000231 l 16 March 2019 l www.thegrocer.co.uk www.fsc-uk.org AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING TETRA PAK PROTECT WHAT’S GOOD DETAILS Tetra Pak Eagle House Peregrine Business Park Gomm Rd High Wycombe HP13 7DL 01494 886000 www.tetrapak co.uk/goodchoice KEY CONTACTS Erik Lindroth Sustainability Director, Tetra Pak North Europe Ben Cutts Business Development Director, Tetra Pak North Europe KEY BRANDS Tetra Pak The problem of plastic pollution has been building up for years, and is now perhaps a top priority since nature programmes like Blue Planet II Consumers, retailers and producers need to think of the bigger picture when it comes to packaging choices - where the material comes from, what it’s made of and what happens after it’s recycled Erik Lindroth, sustainability director, Tetra Pak North Europe says: “For us it’s all about ‘protecting what’s good’, hence why cartons are designed to be low in plastic, easily recyclable and have low CO2 impact On average, 75% of our carton is made from paperboard from trees – a plant-based and renewable material “Because of this, only a small amount of plastic needs to be used in beverage cartons and after use, cartons can be recycled in over 90% of local authority areas These recycled materials can then ❝ For us it’s all about ‘protecting what’s good’ ❞ WATER IN A GOOD PACKAGE JUST Water’s packaging is driven by sustainability and a desire to the right things for our planet The carton is mostly made from renewable resources, is recyclable and has a low CO impact If sustainability is on your agenda, consider Tetra Pak ccartons as your packaging choice today: www.tetrapak.co.uk be made into new products like tubes, cores and containers.” Tetra Pak cartons can contain 80% less plastic than an equivalent plastic bottle, which is peace of mind for environmentally conscious consumers and brands looking for more sustainable packaging options Tetra Pak has also been trialling a paper straw that is suitable for portionsized carton packages, as part of a broader programme to help address the issue of plastic straw waste Lindroth says: “You can see the positive impact of choosing cartons first hand through our work with Just Water Just Water chose Tetra Top from Tetra Pak as an alternative to plastic bottles and to reduce the impact of bottled water on the environment.” The carton is made mostly from paperboard from renewable sources, while the cap is made from renewable plant-based n plastic from sugarcane  THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING KP CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF RPET DETAILS Klöckner Pentaplast Kingdom Street London W2 6BD 01977 692 111 kpinfo@kpfilms.com KEY CONTACTS Maurizio Carano Marketing Director EMEA Helene Roberts MD UK and Australia KEY BRANDS Elite Ellipse Jewel Pentafood For over 10 years leading plastics manufacturer Klöckner Pentaplast (KP) has been at the forefront of sustainable packaging with solutions made from 100% post-consumer recycled PET, (rPET) Dr Helene Roberts, MD of UK and Australia says: “Since 2009, our UK site in Featherstone has been delivering rPET solutions that can be further recycled, so thereby supporting a circular economy, and all the PET used is from post consumer sources By investing in technology that allows us to clean curbside collected PET material and comply with all the food contact regulations, KP stands now as the top user of recycled plastic within the packaging industry in the UK In 2018 KP has used over 140,000 tonnes of PCR globally, hence supporting a plastic economy that creates value and keeps plastic away from the oceans.” KEY ROLE PLAYER KP understands the important role that the company can play within its value chain Designing and producing 100% PCR made products and make sure they can be further recycled is only part of the work 10  l  16 March 2019  l  www.thegrocer.co.uk ❝ KP stands now as the top user of recycled plastic within the packaging industry in the UK ❞ Dr Helene Roberts adds: “Communicating to retailers and consumers on the opportunity presented by recycled plastic and our deep involvement with local sorters and recyclers is more and more an integral part of daily life “KP also has more than six active EU funded projects that aim at pushing these technologies even further.” Klöckner Pentaplast believes this will ultimately optimise processes involved from end to end of the supply chain and will create a true positive plastics economy Dr Roberts says: “Our journey that started 10 years ago in the UK has now become an integral part of the Klöckner Pentaplast global strategy on materials, aiming at further maximising the content of PCR material in our product n lines.”  AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING NOLUMA PROTECTED PACKAGING PAYS DETAILS Noluma International, LLC 1007 Market Street 10th Floor Wilmington DE 19899 +1 (302) 773-2583 info@Noluma.com www.noluma.com/ KEY CONTACTS Divya Chopra President Georgia Kollias VP Global Brand Development Cathy Hyde Business Director UK Geert Sterkendries Technical Director UK/EU KEY BRANDS Noluma We all know that consumers are concerned about the issue of sustainability However, a more fundamental question is often forgotten: how can I be sure that the packaging is actually doing an adequate job of protecting the produce within? Noluma president Divya Chopra says: “And it’s a question that, when asked and then addressed, can have real commercial benefits for FMCG brands Noluma’s work with Jersey Girls Dairy, a dairy farm based in Vermont USA, is a good example of how introducing light-protected packaging not only improves quality for consumers, but can also provide a real boost to sales “As a company, Jersey Girls takes pride in making sure their artisanal milk is of the highest possible quality As such, they were concerned when they found out that the packaging transporting the milk from farm to customer was not protecting it from the damage caused by light, both real and artificial Unless light is blocked by purpose-made lightprotected packaging, it can have a significant negative impact on the taste and nutritional content of milk “To preserve nutrients, freshness and sensory qualities, Jersey Girls partnered with Noluma to measure the light-protection of its packaging and advise on the development of a container that would fully protect its farm-fresh milk “Through this partnership, Jersey Girls launched a new light-protected bottle, certified with a Noluma logo, and used 12  l  16 March 2019  l  www.thegrocer.co.uk ❝ Carton is truly the most sustainable packaging material ❞ local campaigns to help educate people about how all kinds of light affect milk The campaign resulted in Jersey Girls’ sales tripling in just two weeks.” SO HOW DOES IT WORK? Noluma is the first company to use technology to assess, measure and certify light protection in packaging Noluma’s testing process replicates two weeks of light exposure in just two hours, and can measure sensory changes 99% more accurately than conducting a standard evaluation with a panel of expert taste testers The team can then assess the effectiveness of the packaging and offer guidance on how to redesign packaging to adequately protect from light damage Noluma objectively collaborates with consumer-packaged goods companies and their convertors to find the most effective ways to enhance the light protection of packaging Noluma is the only company to certify products that meet the highest standards of light protection, providing them with a Noluma logo to reassure consumers that the products have been protected Chopra concludes: “As the Jersey Girls case study demonstrates, once consumers become aware of light damage, they will begin to look for light-protected packaging solutions that preserve the goodness in the brands they love When consumers see the Noluma logo, they’ll know that the product is sufficiently protected, and will be of the same quality as n it was when it left the farm.” AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING BPIF CARTONS AND PRO CARTON CARTONS OFFER THE SOLUTION DETAILS BPIF Cartons www.bpifcartons org.uk Pro Carton www.procarton.com KEY CONTACTS Jon Clark General Manager of BPIF Cartons enquiries@ bpifcartons.org.uk Tony Hitchin General Manager of Pro Carton info@procarton.com Consumers’ perceptions of packaging have changed dramatically over the last two years prompting Pro Carton, the European association of carton and cartonboard manufacturers, to undertake a huge Europe-wide survey to understand exactly what consumers felt and how this is affecting their behaviour The independent European Consumer Packaging Perceptions study, surveyed a total of 7,000 consumers across the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Poland and Turkey The results revealed that two thirds (68%) of Europeans felt being environmentally-friendly was now more, or very important to them and 74% accepted that media coverage on packaging waste has actually influenced their purchasing habits In the UK over two thirds (68%) said that the environmental impact of a product’s packaging now affects their purchasing decisions Tony Hitchin, general manager of Pro Carton, said: “The prevailing consumer trend towards more environmentallyfriendly packaging means that if shoppers have a choice, they are much more likely to choose the sustainable option even if it costs a bit more In the UK more than four out of five (85%) of consumers surveyed said that given the choice, they would choose cartonboard/cardboard packaging over plastic.” Hitchin added: “Cartonboard is truly the most sustainable packaging material Not only is it renewable, coming Left to right: Tony Hitchin, general manager of Pro Carton; Jon Clark, general manager of BPIF Cartons 14  l  16 March 2019  l  www.thegrocer.co.uk ❝ Cartonboard is truly the most sustainable packaging material ❞ from trees grown in sustainably managed forests but it is, of course, recyclable and biodegradable, making it the perfect example of the circular economy.” Brands are beginning to make the switch to cartonboard and out of less sustainable materials Jon Clark, the general manager of BPIF Cartons – the trade association for the UK folding carton industry – commented: “We’ve seen the demand for carton packaging grow significantly and there’s been major investment throughout the industry to satisfy the need for more sustainable packaging.” PROTECTS THE ENVIRONMENT Hitchin points out that although shoppers understand that packaging’s primary function is to protect its contents, there is also a growing awareness of the importance of protecting the environment He says: “‘Easy to recycle’ ranks second behind “protecting the product” as one of the most important packaging features, followed by ‘made of natural, renewable materials’, ahead of factors such as providing nutritional information and ease of opening Consumers also want more information on-pack about the packaging A resounding 90% of shoppers in all countries said they’d like information on-pack about the environmentally-friendliness of packaging But perhaps the most telling number was the level of dissatisfaction with the pace of change An incredible 72% of UK shoppers felt that retailers and brand owners weren’t doing enough to introduce more environmentally friendly packaging The industry is now challenged with changing the status quo by replacing non-sustainable packaging with more environmentally-friendly such as cartonboard and other paper-based materials and in doing so make the changes necessary to future-proof their products to the benefit of the environment – and their n profits. AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING ULMA DRIVING FORCE IN PACKAGING DETAILS Ulma Packaging UK Unit 2, Church Lane Dinnington Sheffield S25 2LY 01909 506504 sales@ulmapackaging co.uk www.ulmapackaging co.uk KEY CONTACTS Chris Pickles Managing Director KEY PRODUCTS TFS 200 MSV (thermoformer) TFS 407R (thermoformer) Venturi System Tight Bag (VFFS air extraction system) Ulma Packaging UK is a leading provider of specialist packaging machinery solutions, supplying some of the best-known names in the British food industry From tray sealing systems, thermoformers, horizontal flow wrappers and vertical form fill sealers to shrink heat sealing, sleeve and stretch film wrapping – as well as fully automated line and product handling solutions – there is no packaging need or challenge that can’t be catered for and met CHAMPIONING CHANGE As part of the ULMA Group, which has its global headquarters and main packaging machinery production facilities in Oñati, Spain, Ulma UK offers world-class innovation, heritage and high-quality equipment that is designed and manufactured based on over 60 years of continuous development and technical expertise This means Ulma UK covers a wide variety of markets, including meat, poultry, fish, pet food, baked goods, confectionary, cheese, dried fruit, fresh produce and ready meals, with business development specialists in each sector working in partnership with customers to meet their individual packaging needs Always seeking to introduce and improve efficiencies in the supply chain, Ulma UK is environmentally minded too As well as helping businesses achieve their operational goals and delivery targets, one of its top priorities is to help food producers and Britain’s leading supermarkets reduce the amount of plastic packaging and film entering the marketplace, whilst using the latest in energy saving components A GAME CHANGER Ulma’s Venturi System for example, is set to be a game changer in the UK loose leaf salad market following successful trials in the fresh herb sector The unique packaging method is designed to miti- 18  l  16 March 2019  l  www.thegrocer.co.uk ❝ There is no packaging need or challenge that can’t be catered for and met ❞ gate damage to light leaves by creating a vacuum under the produce and accelerating it into the bag The application has a host of other benefits when compared to conventional packaging methods Unlike traditional vertical packaging machines where the re-work required for bags with product entrapment in the seal is between 7-10%, the Venturi System’s use of air to pull the product all the way down to the bottom of the bag safely can lead to a significant reduction in re-work The system has proven to show a reduction in line operatives and increased output The bag length and width can also be reduced thanks to the fact that the product is pulled further inside the packaging during sealing, which saves money, film and material wastage throughout the process Other recent innovations introduced in the UK include Ulma’s TFS407R thermoformer, which reduces film waste by up to 40 per cent, and the revolutionary VFFS Air Extraction System (Tight Bag), which removes excess air using a controlled vacuum before sealing the bag During trials, at least 10-20% more packs per pallet were achieved, reducing logistics costs Chris Pickles, MD at Ulma Packaging UK,says: “Growing concerns over plastic pollution and the impact of food packaging waste on the environment is increasing the demand for more sustainable alternatives The good news is that the availability of innovative machinery, like the Venturi System, TFS407R thermoformer and Tight Bag method, are already helping to make waste reduction a reality “We are always working on developing the next ‘big thing’ to benefit the packaging industry and there will be more exciting developments to follow with a focus on reducing pack sizes and film usage while increasing compatibility with biodegradable and recyclable materials.” n AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER WILLIAM REED BUSINESS MEDIA LTD Broadfield Park, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9RT Tel:01293 613400 Fax: 01293 610380 www.thegrocer.co.uk ... differ, but it shows the strength ❯❯❯ www.thegrocer.co.uk l 16 March 2019 l THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING ANALYSIS ❯❯❯ of feeling on the issue.” To get past the initial intuitive, emotional and... planet but also for the brand, Johanna Thomson reports l 16 March 2019 l www.thegrocer.co.uk AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER There are very few areas of grocery – or any other industry for... in doing so make the changes necessary to future-proof their products to the benefit of the environment – and their n profits. AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GROCER THE GROCER GUIDE TO PACKAGING
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