AZAR GRAMMAR SERIES expansion activities intermidate level 3rd edition

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Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 1: Present Time Activity: What’s My Line? Materials needed: Small slips of paper with a job written on each one Description: An adaptation of the old American TV game show The instructor writes names of jobs on slips of paper and lets the first student choose one This student sits at the front of the class and answers questions from the rest of the students The rest of the class has to guess the student’s imaginary occupation The students can only ask yes/no questions The questions may include adverbs of frequency For example: Do you always work indoors?  Yes, I Do you work in an office?  I sometimes work in an office Do you use a computer?  Yes, I often use a computer Are you a computer programmer?  No, I’m not Do you usually work with math and numbers?  No, I rarely work with numbers Do you work alone?  No, I don’t Do you talk a lot in your job?  Yes, I Do you talk a lot on the phone?  No, not on the phone Do you talk a lot with groups of people?  Yes, I usually talk with groups Are you a supervisor ?  No, I’m not Are you an English teacher?  Yes, I am! The jobs, of course, should be selected based on the level and background experience of your class Consider students’ knowledge of the job’s existence and their knowledge of English vocabulary needed for the job Encourage them to use complete sentences in their questions and adverbs of frequency in their questions and answers Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 2: Past Time Activity: Story Chain Materials needed: Small slips of paper with a base-form verb on each Many of the verbs should be irregular Description: Students will create an oral story as a group, using the verb they selected at random If possible, arrange the desks in a circle If that isn’t possible, try standing around the room in a large circle Finally, if there are more than 20 students in the class, you may want to this in two groups simultaneously Let students choose a verb slip at random from a hat or container Then begin the story with a scenario For example, the teacher might begin: “For many years, the old Peterman house on the hill looked down on the town of Maybridge The house was in bad condition, its paint peeling, its wood rotting Nothing grew around the house The grass was always brown, and the trees leafless and dead Even though old Mr Peterman had died twenty years ago, mysterious lights could sometimes be seen flickering in the house Parents warned their children not to play near the house But children sometimes dared each other to run up to the door of the house and run away again Sixteen-year-old Jason took this game a step further one night He dared his friends, Sarah and Bill, to go into the Peterman house, climb to the attic window, and wave to him from there Feeling adventuresome, and wanting to show they were not frightened babies, Sarah and Bill agreed to go.” Then the first student near the teacher carries on the story The student has to incorporate his or her verb in the simple past or past progressive tense The student can contribute several sentences, and will often need to, to get to the part of the story where he or she can use the verb For example, let’s say the first student has the verb bring The student might continue where the teacher left off: Student 1: “There was no electricity in the house, of course, so Sara and Bill brought two flashlights with them.” Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 2: Past Time Activity: Story Chain Student 2: “They climbed the front steps of the house and opened the door.” Student 3: “The house was very dark They heard a noise It was like an animal noise.” Student 4: “Suddenly something jumped at them It was some kind of animal Bill threw his flashlight at the animal The animal jumped out the window.” Student 5: “Now they only had one flashlight Sarah wanted to go upstairs right away, but Bill wanted to leave and get another flashlight His father taught him not to a job without the right tools.” Student 6: “But Sarah insisted, so they went upstairs The kids were wearing tennis shoes Their footsteps were quiet But they could hear other footsteps in the house.” The story continues around the circle Encourage creativity and moving the story along If a student gets stuck and doesn’t know how to fit his or her verb in the story, let the whole group help If the story lags because the students aren’t moving the plot, the teacher can intervene with a sentence of his or her own that moves the story along (For instance, a student, perhaps the second or third in line, might have the verb dream She might say something like “… and she had dreamed it all None of it was true,” which pretty much puts an end to the story before it even gets started Encourage the rest of the class to help her come up with something different.) About twenty students is the maximum for this activity or else students will have too much down time when they are not saying anything If you want to break the class up into two groups, create two scenarios One group works orally as described above; the other group works silently passing a piece of paper around, each student adding his or her part To make the writing group more productive, start two pieces of paper going in two different directions This means that the same student will add the first line of the story going one way, and the last line of the story going the other way This creates two stories out of the same scenario, each with the same target past-tense verbs Additionally, it keeps the writers more involved since their activity is not as interactive as the oral group Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 3: Future Time Activity: Scene Predictions Materials needed: A short movie or TV show that hinges on action rather than dialogue Description: In this activity, students are encouraged to use will, be going to, and modals of possibility, as well as the phrase be about to, and the words maybe and probably Students watch a movie Pause the movie at pivotal moments and asks the students to guess what is going to happen next Students can predict what follows in that scene, or in the next scene Whatever video is shown, it should be strongly visual and have some unpredictable physical action Slapstick-style humor, with falling flowerpots and people slipping on banana peels, works, as kids’ cartoons Jimmy Neutron is a children’s animated show that is excellent because it is all very unpredictable and has brief 15 minute episodes that can be shown in their entirety Other movies that work well are Mr Bean, parts of Pink Panther movies, and pre-teen movies like RV, Zoom, Spy Kids, and Sky High Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 3: Future Time Activity: Making a Date Materials needed: A set of prepared handouts that look like date-book pages (See page 2) Description: Students have to make an appointment with each other to study for an important test The test is on Monday, September 16 The students need about three hours of time, but they may have to break it into two 1.5 hour sessions Students work in pairs, and one student receives the A version of the calendar page while the other students uses the B version Have them sit back to back and not look at each other’s handout Each of the versions has many dates filled in, and it will be difficult for students to arrange an appointment, but that is the point Brainstorm with students the question forms needed to schedule a meeting with someone Are you busy on ? Are you free on ? What/ how about at ? Can you at _? Brainstorm how to talk about definite future plans the kind of plans one puts in a date book Students should use present progressive and be going to Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 3: Future Time Activity: Making a Date STUDENT A: September: Sun Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sat Shopping w Grandma 11:302:30 Class- 8-2 Work9-3 Class- 8-2 Work9-3 Class- 8-2 Work 9-4 Sun Mon Study Ch chemistry, finish report Class- 8-2 Work 4-9 Coffee w Ann 5:30 Tues 10 Day off!! Help Chris paint apartment STUDENT B Sun Mon Breakfast with dad 9:00health club Class- 9-3 Work 5-9 Patty’s party 8:00 Wed 11 Thurs 12 Fri 13 Class- 8-2 Work- 9-3 Class- 8-2 Meet w Pick up TVstudy group- repair shop library-3 before Dentist 3:30 Work 1-9 p.m September: Tues Work 3-10 pm Wed Thurs Fri Class- 9-3 Day off Class- 12-3 Basketball tickets- 7:15 Math study group 3:30 Jim’s party 8:00 Fri 13 Meeting w advisor 4:30 Sun Mon Tues 10 Wed 11 Thurs 12 Work 10-5 Class- 9-3 Work 9-4 Class- 9-3 Study for Class- 12-3 psych test in the a.m Pick up Aunt Ann – Tennis with airport 8:15 Carrie 1:30 p.m Get oil changed 4:30 Sat 14 Coffee with Jeff 6:00 Sat Work 2-10 p.m Sat 14 Work 9-3 Family dinner 7:00 Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 4: The Present Perfect and the Past Perfect Activity: Picture Perfect Materials needed: Photos that can be used to express the present perfect and present perfect progressive See the following pages (page and 3) of clip art Description: In this oral activity, the simple photos are prompts to get the students creating sentences using the present perfect and the present perfect progressive While it is fairly easy to come up with the first, most obvious sentence, the students should be urged to work with a partner to develop several sentences for each picture For example: This lady has just finished shopping She has been at the mall since early in the morning Her feet are tired because she has been walking all day She has spent all her money, but she hasn’t finished buying clothes for her vacation yet Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 4: The Present Perfect and the Past Perfect Activity: Picture Perfect These pictures show something that has just, or recently, happened Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 4: The Present Perfect and the Past Perfect Activity: Picture Perfect These activities have been going on for several hours Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 4: The Present Perfect and the Past Perfect Activity: How Things Have Changed! Materials needed: Photos that illustrate a before/after scene See sample photos below Description: One of the uses of the present perfect is to describe change over time Students can stretch their vocabulary talking about before and after pictures Put the pictures within a simple, general context to stimulate the students’ imagination For example, what if they had last visited a city five years ago? Now, on their return visit, they are surprised by developments and describe what has changed My visit to Boulder, Colorado, five years ago, and recently years ago years ago Recently Recently Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 8: Connecting Ideas Activity: Finding Relationships Materials needed: A page of paired pictures, sets of connecting words on small slips of paper Description: Students have to use a random connecting word to create a relationship between the objects or the scenes in two pictures Write the connecting words from Chapter on individual pieces of paper and but or so neither either because although even though too You can create several complete sets of these words so there is a set for every three or four pairs of students Place the set of papers near the pairs of students Give each student the handout of the pairs of pictures Each pair of students chooses a word slip and tries to make a relationship sentence linking the first pair of pictures A sample page of pictures is provided on the following page This activity requires great creativity and lateral thinking, and even students who randomly pull the same word for the same pair of pictures won’t come up with the same relationship Example: Use the word so- Students might say “A computer is a useful tool, and so is a hammer.” Or if the students pulled the word because -“You shouldn’t use a hammer around a computer because a computer is fragile.” Or if the students pulled the word but -A hammer doesn’t need electricity, but a computer does With the word neither -“A computer isn’t used to clean the kitchen, and neither is a hammer.” Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 8: Connecting Ideas Activity: Finding Relationships Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 9: Comparisons Activity: Smart Shopping Materials needed: Access to web pages or photocopies of web pages featuring product comparison charts Description: Students “shop” for products comparing multiple features by studying some websites that offer side-by-side product comparison charts (While there are many websites that provide comparisons, not all are formatted as a chart.) This realia-based activity is a great way for students to practice the important skill of careful consumerism Not only does the exercise require authentic use of comparative and superlative forms in addition to other vocabulary of comparison, but this real-life task also introduces new immigrants to the Internet as a valuable resource for consumers Using product comparison charts gives students practice in thinking about points of comparison, which points are essential to their needs, and which are not Here are some links to product and service comparison charts: PDAs and Cell Phones http://www.pcmag.com/compare_products/0,1943,,00.asp?a=136901,154880,143647,162 382&pt=0&sid=1566 Types of TVs http://www.crutchfieldadvisor.com/ISEO-rgbtcspd/learningcenter/home/TV_chart.html Lodging Choices at Yosemite National Park http://www.yosemitepark.net/ylchart.htm Hybrid Cars http://www.consumersearch.com/www/automotive/hybrid-cars/comparison.html Juicers http://www.harvestessentials.com/juco.html Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 9: Comparisons Activity: Smart Shopping In addition to charts, a large quantity of information about individual products can be found online in text format A related, more complex activity would be for students to make their own chart comparing two item brands or types Students can think of common items people need to consider carefully before buying, like a refrigerator, a computer, or a child car seat Students decide what features should be compared and then research the products and fill in their chart, set up like a matrix, with one axis being the products and the other axis being the points to compare Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 10: The Passive Activity: Oetzi the Iceman / Passive Voice Materials needed: A high-interest article or passage that uses a lot of passive voice An article is included below Description: Students read and discuss an article about a European mummy, Oetzi, found in the 1990s in the thawing ice of the Alps The article uses a lot of passive voice, primarily in the simple past and present perfect, although there are a few modal passives as well This article has been abridged from a much longer one, and the web link to the original is included below, as well as a link to photos to warm the class up to the “Iceman.” Use of this article depends on which point of the passive lesson a class is working on at the moment Initial grammar discovery: Provide comprehension questions that elicit a passive response Compare them to questions and answers that require an active-voice response Identifying the passive: Students read the article searching for uses of the passive Remind students to look for forms of the Be verb, but remind them that not every Be verb is part of the passive! Practice: Students discuss why the passive voice is used in various sentences More practice: Make a jigsaw by dividing the article into Part A and B One student has the complete Part A with missing information in Part B, and the other student has the complete Part B with missing information in Part A Students must ask and answer each other’s questions to complete the information Still more practice: Students change the passive to active where logical Just one more practice! After the article has been thoroughly read and discussed, the instructor puts key words on the board and the students recreate passive sentences about Oetzi without referring to the article Example: find Oetzi was found in 1991 Name Oetzi was named after a valley in the Alps Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 10: The Passive Activity: Oetzi the Iceman / Passive Voice Oetzi the Iceman Oetzi the Iceman is the modern nickname of a well-preserved natural mummy of a man from about 3300 BC The mummy was found in 1991 in a glacier of the Otztal Alps, near the border between Austria and Italy Oetzi was named after the valley of his discovery He rivals the Egyptian "Ginger" as the oldest known human mummy, and he has offered a unique view of the habits of Copper Age Europeans Oetzi was found by two German tourists on September 19, 1991 The body was at first thought to be a modern corpse, like several others which had recently been found in the area It was roughly recovered by the Austrian authorities and taken to Innsbruck, where its true age was finally discovered It is now being displayed at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bozen-Bolzano, Italy The body has been extensively examined, measured, x-rayed, and dated Tissues and stomach contents were examined microscopically Scientists believe that at the time of his death, Oetzi was a 30-to-45-year old man, approximately 160 cm (5'3") tall Analysis of pollen and dust grains on his clothing, and analysis of Oetzi’s teeth enamel show that his childhood was spent near the present village of Feldthurns, north of Bolzano He later went to live in valleys about 50 km further north The Iceman had 57 tattoos Some were located on or near acupuncture points that are used today to treat symptoms of digestive problems and osteoarthritis Interestingly, scientists have found that Oetzi suffered from digestive problems and osteoarthritis Some scientists believe that these tattoos indicate an early type of acupuncture Oetzi’s clothes include a cloak, vest, and shoes They were quite sophisticated The cloak was woven from grass, and the vest was made of leather The shoes were waterproof and wide They seemed to be designed for walking across the snow; they were constructed of bearskin, deer hide, and tree bark Soft grass was wrapped around the foot and also placed in the shoe The grass functioned like warm socks Recently, the shoes were reproduced by experts They are of such excellent quality, that there are plans for them to be made commercially Other items found with the Iceman include a copper axe, flint knife, and a bow and quiver of arrows Additionally, Oetzi carried two species of mushrooms One of these mushrooms is known to have antibacterial properties, and was likely used for medical purposes Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 10: The Passive Activity: Oetzi the Iceman / Passive Voice Researchers believe Oetzi may have been involved in a fight Injuries from the fight may have killed him A DNA analysis revealed traces of blood from four other people on his gear: one from his knife, two from the same arrowhead, and a fourth from his coat A CAT scan revealed that an arrowhead was stuck in Oetzi’s shoulder when he died The arrow shaft had been removed, but the arrowhead had been left inside his body He also had bruises and cuts on his hands, wrists, and chest From such evidence, and an examination of his weapons, molecular biologist Thomas Loy from the University of Queensland believes that Oetzi and his companions were hunters who fought with a rival group At some point, he may have carried (or been carried by) a companion He may have been weakened by blood loss As a result, Oetzi apparently put down his equipment neatly against a rock, lay down, and died His body was covered by thousands of years of ice and snow until his recent discovery Pieces of his clothing, his hair, his skin, and his personal possessions were well-preserved because of the cold temperatures This article has been abridged and slightly simplified from an article appearing at http://www.crystalinks.com/oetzi.html It has had a few more passives added to it Link to this article to show your class pictures of the mummy This website has a few pictures including a recreation of how Oetzi might have looked in life http://www.hominides.com/html/ancetres/otzi.htm (The site is in French, but the photos are selfexplanatory.) Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 11: Count/Noncount Nouns and Articles Activity: Stop Me If I’m Wrong! Materials needed: A brief story with errors in determiner use (A story has been provided.) Student copies of the same story with cloze Description: In groups, students complete the cloze activity with the correct determiner (including  determiner) or unit of measure When they are finished, the instructor reads his or her copy of the story, complete with errors When students think they have heard an error, they shout “stop!” and give the instructor the correct answer Instructor Copy (no errors): I had an interesting experience a few days ago I was on the bus to work when I saw a woman The woman looked just like a friend of mine, Patty She had the same long black hair I hadn’t seen Patty for several years, but we talk to each other on the phone sometimes I got off the bus and crossed the street to my office building There is a wonderful glass elevator on the outside of the building I got in the elevator and pushed the button for the 12th floor Music was softly playing I enjoyed the scenery of the city skyline and looked down at some cars stuck in the traffic below The sky was clear, and there was only a little smog There were a lot of people in the elevator We stopped on the 4th floor; an elderly woman got off We stopped on the 5th floor, and a few men got off By the 10th floor, there were only a few people on the elevator I listened to the music coming over the loudspeakers Suddenly I heard a song from long ago It was a song that was very popular when Patty and I were in high school together We had so much fun then It was nice to hear that song after so many years I was so involved in the music, that I accidentally stepped off the elevator on the 11th floor I was confused for a moment when, instead of my office, I saw a door with a sign on it that said “Law Office of Patricia O’Connor.” Patricia! Another reminder of my friend Patty On the 12th floor, I grabbed a cup of coffee and a bag of pretzels from the vending machine and went into my office I quickly checked my email I didn’t have much time before my first meeting There was an email from Patty She said “Hey friend, I hope you are doing well Can you give me some advice about what to wear in Seattle in April? You see, I’ll be there next week to visit you! Bye for now, Patty.” Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 11: Count/Noncount Nouns and Articles Activity: Stop Me If I’m Wrong! Instructor Copy (with errors): (Errors are in bold Underlined words are blanks in the student version.) I had some interesting experience a few days ago I was on the bus to work when I saw a woman A woman looked just like a friend of mine, Patty She had a lot of same long black hair I hadn’t seen Patty for several years, but we talk to each other on the phone sometimes I got off a bus and crossed the street to my office building There is a wonderful glass elevator on the outside of the building I got in the elevator and pushed a button for the 12th floor Music was softly playing I enjoyed a scenery of the city skyline and looked down at some cars stuck in the traffic below The sky was clear and there was only a few smog There were a lot of people in the elevator We stopped on the 4th floor; an elderly woman got off We stopped on the 5th floor, and a few men got off By the 10th floor, there were only a little people on the elevator I listened to the music coming over the loudspeakers Suddenly I heard the song from long ago It was a song that was very popular when Patty and I were in high school together We had so many fun then It was nice to hear that song after so many years I was so involved in a music, that I accidentally stepped off the elevator on the 11th floor I was confused for several moment when, instead of my office, I saw a door with a sign on it that said “Law Office of Patricia O’Connor.” Patricia! Another reminder of my friend Patty On the 12th floor, I grabbed a jar of coffee and a can of pretzels from the vending machine and went into my office I quickly checked my email I didn’t have many time before my first meeting There was an email from Patty She said “Hey friend, I hope you are doing well Can you give me a few advice about what to wear in the Seattle in April? You see, I’ll be there next week to visit you! Bye for now, Patty” Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 11: Count/Noncount Nouns and Articles Activity: Stop Me If I’m Wrong! Student Copy I had _ interesting experience a few days ago I was on the bus to work when I saw _woman _ woman looked just like a friend of mine, Patty She had _same long black hair I hadn’t seen Patty for _years, but we talk to each other on _phone sometimes I got off _ bus and crossed the street to my office building There is a wonderful glass elevator on _ outside of _building I got in _ elevator and pushed _button for the 12th floor Music was softly playing I enjoyed _ scenery of the city skyline and looked down at some cars stuck in _traffic below The sky was clear and there was only a _ smog There were _of people in the elevator We stopped on _ 4th floor; _elderly woman got off We stopped on the 5th floor, and a _ men got off By the 10th floor, there were only a _ people on the elevator I listened to the music coming over the loudspeakers Suddenly I heard _song from long ago It was a song that was very popular when Patty and I were in high school together We had so _fun then It was nice to hear that song after so _ years I was so involved in _music, that I accidentally stepped off _elevator on _ 11th floor I was confused for _ moment when, instead of my office, I saw _door with a sign on it that said “Law Office of Patricia O’Connor” Patricia! Another reminder of my friend Patty On the 12th floor, I grabbed a _of coffee and a _ of pretzels from the vending machine and went into my office I quickly checked my email I didn’t have _ time before my first meeting There was _email from Patty She said “Hey friend, I hope you are doing well Can you give me _advice about what to wear in _Seattle in April? You see, I’ll be there next week to visit you! Bye for now, Patty.” Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 12: Adjective Clauses Activity: Wacky Clauses Materials needed: A Mad Lib-type text with incomplete adjective clauses One has been provided on the following page Description: In pairs, students complete the text One student has the cloze version of the text and tells the other student to provide the necessary phrases or parts of speech The student should not provide any context for his or her partner, just saying, for example, “Give me a place.” When all the blanks have been filled in, the person who held the cloze text can read the complete text to his or her partner The goofy results are amusing! With the blanks now filled in, both students can look at the text and identify the completed adjective clauses Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR, Third Edition EXPANSION ACTIVITIES Dangers of the Goliath Bee Sting A sting from the Goliath Bee, which is a flying insect found mainly in , can be very dangerous The first rule of cure is prevention (a place) People who in/to should take care not to anger (simple present verb) (same place) Goliath Bees One thing especially makes a Goliath Bee very angry: Never a bee that _ The danger of (imperative verb + (verb in present perfect progressive) prep if necessary) the Goliath Bee sting is in the poison The bee injects a poison that contains (a liquid) into its victim’s body A person who is stung in the _ has only a 50-50 (body part) chance of survival But a person who is stung in the _ will be OK if (another body part) treatment is given immediately First, smash the stinger by hitting it with a _ that has been rolled in _ Next, the victim needs to (noun) (a food or drink item) while at the same time repeating (a household chore) “ _” ten times (a simple sentence including a prepositional phrase) Finally, victims need to find a place where they can (adverb) _, (base form verb) and this until the swelling goes down Be aware that a person whose ability to _ has been affected may never _ again (verb) (a skill or talent) Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 13: Gerunds and Infinitives Activity: Talk It Over Using Gerunds and Infinitives Materials needed: Copies of the “board” game provided for each small group Each group also needs a marker for each player (a nickel, a dime, a pencil eraser, a button, etc.), and each group needs a coin to flip Description: This is a guided-speaking activity with conversation prompts The prompts encourage use of gerunds and infinitives following a main verb Students can play in groups of three or four, using a coin to flip You can use heads moves one and tails moves two, or to create more competition, heads moves one and tails moves three Students should use the questions as prompts, and rather artificially, speak with a few full sentences in order to practice the use of gerunds and infinitives However, beyond that, encourage students to converse freely about the questions, asking each other questions for more details Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 13: Gerunds and Infinitives Activity: Talk It Over Using Gerunds and Infinitives Start here What you enjoy doing in your free time?  What will you never stop doing? What would you like to learn to do? What you sometimes put off doing?  What is something you promised your mother to do?  Have you ever forgotten to something important? What? What is something special you really want to before you die? What are thinking about doing next summer?   Why you believe What are you nervous about or not believe in doing in your ghosts?  future?  What chores were you responsible for doing when you were a child?  What are you doing in the future that you are excited about?  Do you ever feel to shy to something? Explain  What you think you are too young to do? What you think you are too old to do?   Do you have enough time to what you need to in your life? Explain    Are you What are you good considering any job at doing? or career changes?  Explain  END What topics are you interested in reading about? What you hate doing?   What is something you can’t wait to do? When and where is the last place you went sightseeing? What you need to to succeed in school?    Page of Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 14: Noun Clauses Activity: Liar! Liar! Materials needed: None Description: Students tell four interesting, unusual, or unexpected facts about themselves One of the “facts,” however, is untrue The other students have to guess which statement is the lie by using the noun clause question format “Is it really true that …?” This activity works well in groups of 5-8 students This group size allows for ample opportunity to practice the noun clause idiom, without having many students stay silent too long while awaiting a turn Either before or after they are in a group, students should be given 10 minutes to come up with their four statements Coach them to not make their lie too obvious Sometimes the most banal statement is an effective lie! Example: Student A: “I have seen UFOs in the Bermuda Triangle.” “I’ve been in a motorcycle accident.” “I’ve hiked down the Grand Canyon.” “I hate coffee.” Student B: “Is it really true that you hate coffee?” Student A: “Yes, it’s true.” Student C: “Is it really true that you have seen UFOs? Student A: “Completely true!” Student D: “Is it really true that you’ve hiked down the Grand Canyon?” Student A: “No, I’m afraid that isn’t true.” As a whole-class follow-up, students can report some of the more interesting facts about their classmates with the noun clause prompts: “I was astounded/amazed/surprised/impressed …” Example: “I was amazed that Lu has seen UFOs.” Copyright © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc All rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use ... reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 4: The Present Perfect and the Past Perfect Activity: Picture Perfect These activities have been... rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 2: Past Time Activity: Story Chain Student 2: “They... rights reserved Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use Expansion Activities Fundamentals of English Grammar, 3rd Edition Chapter 3: Future Time Activity: Scene Predictions Materials
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