Mineral make up (1)

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Cosmetics Cosmetics: are substances used to enhance or protect the appearance or odor of the human body A subset of cosmetics is called "make-up", which refers primarily to colored products intended to alter the user’s appearance The U.S FDA defines cosmetics as: "intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions." Early use of Cosmetics Greeks called it “Kosmetikos,” which means skilled in adornment Egyptians Drawings by ancient Egyptians show face and body decoration Romans Roman culture further refined the art of make-up Chinese Between Pre-Qin ( The 21st Century BC—221 BC) and Han (202BC - 220AD) Dynasties, instead of applying lip balm to all parts of the lips, women put a big red dot on the lower lip and painted the upper lip in a pointed shape, leaving the rest of parts to be covered with powder The art of cosmetics can be traced back to prehistoric times From the prehistoric times, human has been using some or the other natural cosmetic in order to make up their appearance and evidences have been found dating back to almost 5000 years old that confirm that the civilizations at that time used the natural cosmetics in order to improve upon their appearance Archaeological evidence found in Blombos Cave near Cape Town, South Africa, indicate that the cave dwellers not only made body paint but sold it other cave dwellers, as signs of trade were also found in at the site Abalone shells from the ochre toolkit, Blombos Cave Makeup Origin • Cosmetics have been used in the art of making women and men beautiful for years • The Gaul’s dyed their hair red, the Anglo-Saxon went pink with green, orange and blue locks while the Greeks opted for a more sophisticated look, sleeking their hair with gold and silver powders • It was the Egyptians who first manufactured cosmetics on a very large scale and the preparation they used are surprisingly similar to today’s The Egyptian women lined their eyes with dusty kohl and lids shaded with turquoise powder from green copper and lead ore The lips and cheeks were rouged with powdered red clay while henna was used on their feet and toes Cleopatra took baths in milk, which softened and conditioned her skin • In the Victorian era makeup was frowned upon as being indicative of an immoral character and cosmetics had to be applied discretely Queen Alexandra revived the popularity of painted faces and women were soon copying the exaggerated look of stars Makeup pioneers Early Cosmetics • Both Egyptian men and women applied makeup; rouge and lip ointments were considered essentials, as was and henna for giving a red tinge to the nails Women traced the veins in their temples and breasts with blue paint and tipped their nipples with liquid gold • Eye shadow was important to both sexes; it was usually green and applied to both the top and the bottom lids Eyelash and brow enhancers consisting of carbon, black oxide, and other (often toxic) substances were also applied to give wearers that dark, painted–on look so associated with the culture • Eyebrows of Ox and a Little Imagination Some of the earliest evidence of modern beauty equipment has been found in Babylon ruins Tools such as tweezers, brow brushes, and toothpicks were common Both the men and women of Babylon also curled their hair and make up their eyes with eye shadow, eyeliner, and eyelash and brow enhancers They frequently painted their faces with white lead and used henna to color their nails Time Line of Make Up • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 100,000 BC Prehistoric paint pot found in South African cave, for body paint 33,000 BC colored pigments of soot and animal fat 4000 BC Lipstick found in a Babylonian tomb of a man 3000 BC Chinese use dye to stain their fingernails 1365 BC Egyptians adorn themselves with lavish eye makeup AD Romans use Kohl for eyeliner, Greeks used chalk for lighter complexions, Persian women dyed their hair with henna 600 AD Women bled themselves to look pale 1300 AD Different color lipsticks were available 1500 AD Lead Paint and arsenic are used to whiten the complexion 1600 AD Elizabethian women wore egg whites for a glazed complexion 1800 AD Red lipstick and rouge was a sign of good health 1888 AD Deodorant was inventet 1907 AD Synthetic hair dye was invented 1913 AD Mascara was invented 1936 AD Sunscreen was invented 1970 AD Cosmetics were specifically made for African American females 1980 AD Mineral make up is introduced to the public Cosmetic use is Every where Cosmetic Preparations Cosmetics were made for personal use and religious ceremonies Historical records show that many different materials were used for body adornment Makeup Ingredients: Plant Life Bark Leaves Food Items Nuts Herbs Berries Other Items Minerals Insects Minerals as pigments • Bases are Rutile (TiO2) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) • Sparkle is from Mica, muscovite, sericite (fine grained mica) • Kaolin, clay, is to absorb oil from the skin • Pigments are colors that not dissolve – Iron oxide colors red to orange – Chromium oxide colors green – Copper oxide colors green – Azurite colors blue – Lead sulfide (PbS) or Kohl for black, not used in USA Dangerous Beauty •These materials also were used on hair, skin, and nails Some of the ingredients used as cosmetics during ancient times are considered dangerous today For example: –lead white was used in eye shadow, eyeliner and face foundation caused the skin to corrode, then it poisoned the body and eventually lead to death Dangerous Beauty In Greco-Roman societies, women wore white lead and chalk on their faces to attract attention Ancient Egyptians wore foundation to lighten their skin, and the kohl eyeliner they used was only a bit heavier than the eye makeup popular in the mid-1960s Meanwhile, Persians believed henna dyes, used to stain hair and faces, enabled them to summon the majesty of the earth Early Cosmetics • In the Roman Empire, women applied pastes of narcissus, lentils, honey, wheat, and eggs to achieve pale complexions For evening wear, chalk and white lead were applied to the skin, along with rouge The old Egyptian trick of using blue paint to enhance prominent veins was also popular Some people—men and women—rubbed their teeth with a pumice stone Wealthy women had at least one slave assigned the role of cosmetician • With the rise of Christianity, the heavy use of makeup gradually diminished in many cultures However, by the Middle Ages, women were still striving for the fashionably pale look Staying out of the sun was one way to stay pale (if you were rich enough to have servants), but women also often painted their faces with water–soluble paints and white powder • The European Middle Ages followed the Greco-Roman trend of pale faces Those rich enough not to work outdoors and acquire a suntan wanted to show off their affluence by being pale Spanish prostitutes wore pink makeup to contrast with high-class women's pale faces, while regal 13thcentury Italian women wore pink lipstick to show they could afford synthetic makeup • In the 17th century, men and women used makeup to limited degree; ceruse was used as a base, and a cheek and lip reddeners were sometimes applied From the late 1600s forward, makeup began to get heavier First, white paint was applied, then white powder, then a brownish rouge, and red lip color Europe • In Elizabethan England, cosmetics were seen as a health threat because many thought they would block vapors and energy from circulating properly Because men's makeup wasn't as obvious as women's (women wore egg whites over their faces to create a glazed look), it was seen as even more deceptive than women's • By the reign of Charles II, Europe was still recovering from sweeps of illness Many were hesitant to go outdoors, so heavy makeup supplied the color that sun-fearing people couldn't get elsewhere During the French Restoration in the 18th century, red rouge and lipstick were the rage and implied a healthy, fun-loving spirit This stuck in France, but eventually people in other countries became repulsed by excessive makeup use and said the painted French must be unattractive because they had something to hide Victorian Era Victorians claimed to abhor makeup, associating it with prostitutes When makeup regained acceptance in the late 19th century, it was with natural tones so that the healthy, pink-cheeked look could be achieved without giving in to the moral decadence of full makeup, which was still seen as sinful Victorian Era to Present The Victorian face was in fashion until mass makeup marketing hit in the 1920s American women gained the vote, and the newly liberated woman showed how free she was by displaying her right to speak out—red lipstick practically became a social necessity From the 1930s through the 1950s, the looks of various movie stars defined vogue, from Mary Pick ford's baby-doll face to Audrey Hepburn's cat-eyes eyeliner The '60s brought a slew of makeup changes, from whited-out lips and Egyptian-style eyeliner to fantasy images like butterflies painted on faces at high-fashion outings The heavy eyeliner look remained through the late '70s and '80s, with wide color ranges entering the wearer's palette Makeup of today's Western world claims to be a melange of past styles with a new emphasis on the natural look—a natural look that took centuries of painting faces to achieve Makeup Arts Developments Many styles and forms of cosmetics were developed throughout the Middle Ages, the Renaissance Period, the Elizabethan Era, the Age of Extravagance (Baroque Period), and the Victorian Age Cultural Influence Every era represents a time period of cultural influence and change in society - during the roaring ‘20s, the wartime ‘40s, the glamorous ‘50s, and the psychedelic ‘60s Do not limit yourself just to a few new colors or trends Regardless of the season or popular culture, not limit yourself just to a few new colors or trends Improvise and have your artistic juices flow Makeup should suit the individual Fashion, Style, and Makeup should suit the individual The colors, textures, and techniques should reflect a style of the individual’s personality Eye Art The End The most beautiful makeup of a woman is passion But cosmetics are easier to buy.” ― Yves Saint-Laurent [...]... pale Spanish prostitutes wore pink makeup to contrast with high-class women's pale faces, while regal 13thcentury Italian women wore pink lipstick to show they could afford synthetic makeup • In the 17th century, men and women used makeup to limited degree; ceruse was used as a base, and a cheek and lip reddeners were sometimes applied From the late 1600s forward, makeup began to get heavier First, white... repulsed by excessive makeup use and said the painted French must be unattractive because they had something to hide Victorian Era Victorians claimed to abhor makeup, associating it with prostitutes When makeup regained acceptance in the late 19th century, it was with natural tones so that the healthy, pink-cheeked look could be achieved without giving in to the moral decadence of full makeup, which was still... yourself just to a few new colors or trends Improvise and have your artistic juices flow Makeup should suit the individual Fashion, Style, and Makeup should suit the individual The colors, textures, and techniques should reflect a style of the individual’s personality Eye Art The End The most beautiful makeup of a woman is passion But cosmetics are easier to buy.” ― Yves Saint-Laurent ... block vapors and energy from circulating properly Because men's makeup wasn't as obvious as women's (women wore egg whites over their faces to create a glazed look), it was seen as even more deceptive than women's • By the reign of Charles II, Europe was still recovering from sweeps of illness Many were hesitant to go outdoors, so heavy makeup supplied the color that sun-fearing people couldn't get elsewhere... heavy eyeliner look remained through the late '70s and '80s, with wide color ranges entering the wearer's palette Makeup of today's Western world claims to be a melange of past styles with a new emphasis on the natural look—a natural look that took centuries of painting faces to achieve Makeup Arts Developments Many styles and forms of cosmetics were developed throughout the Middle Ages, the Renaissance... mass makeup marketing hit in the 1920s American women gained the vote, and the newly liberated woman showed how free she was by displaying her right to speak out—red lipstick practically became a social necessity From the 1930s through the 1950s, the looks of various movie stars defined vogue, from Mary Pick ford's baby-doll face to Audrey Hepburn's cat-eyes eyeliner The '60s brought a slew of makeup... societies, women wore white lead and chalk on their faces to attract attention Ancient Egyptians wore foundation to lighten their skin, and the kohl eyeliner they used was only a bit heavier than the eye makeup popular in the mid-1960s Meanwhile, Persians believed henna dyes, used to stain hair and faces, enabled them to summon the majesty of the earth Early Cosmetics • In the Roman Empire, women applied... also popular Some people—men and women—rubbed their teeth with a pumice stone Wealthy women had at least one slave assigned the role of cosmetician • With the rise of Christianity, the heavy use of makeup gradually diminished in many cultures However, by the Middle Ages, women were still striving for the fashionably pale look Staying out of the sun was one way to stay pale (if you were rich enough...Minerals as pigments • Bases are Rutile (TiO2) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) • Sparkle is from Mica, muscovite, sericite (fine grained mica) • Kaolin, clay, is to absorb oil from the skin • Pigments are colors
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