SAMSUNG VIETNAMs STRATEGIC CHOICES AND ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

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Samsung Electronics Vietnam (SEV) is a subsidiary of Samsung Group, one of the world’s leading corporations in manufacturing smartphone and advanced technology products. Officially operating in 2009, SEV is now one of the most successful FDIcompanies in Vietnam with exported revenue in 2011 is nearly 6 billion USD, contributed about 6% to total exports in 2011 of Vietnam (Samsung, 2012). SEV also become the world’s largest smartphone manufactory with advanced and complex assembly lines (Kovach, 2013). Aim to be one of the most popular companies in Vietnam, SEV plans to gain the largest share in Vietnamese markets of smartphone and electronic devices. As a strategy consultant of Samsung Vietnam, this paper will analyse the company’s business strategy as well as their organisational effectiveness; besides that, providing recommendations that Samsung Vietnam could use to improve and enhance their competitive strategy to achieve their goals. Samsung Vietnam’s Strategic Choices and STAFFORDSHIRE UNIVERSITY Organisational Effectiveness MODULE TITLE: DESIGNING AND MODULE CODE: BSB10511-5 ASSIGNMENT TYPE: FIRST-SIT HAN 14100008 MANAGING EFFECTIVE ORGANISATIONS Table of Contents I INTRODUCTION Samsung Electronics Vietnam (SEV) is a subsidiary of Samsung Group, one of the world’s leading corporations in manufacturing smartphone and advanced technology products Officially operating in 2009, SEV is now one of the most successful FDI-companies in Vietnam with exported revenue in 2011 is nearly billion USD, contributed about 6% to total exports in 2011 of Vietnam (Samsung, 2012) SEV also become the world’s largest smartphone manufactory with advanced and complex assembly lines (Kovach, 2013) Aim to be one of the most popular companies in Vietnam, SEV plans to gain the largest share in Vietnamese markets of smartphone and electronic devices As a strategy consultant of Samsung Vietnam, this paper will analyse the company’s business strategy as well as their organisational effectiveness; besides that, providing recommendations that Samsung Vietnam could use to improve and enhance their competitive strategy to achieve their goals II SAMSUNG VIETNAM BUSINESS STRATEGY A SWOT ANALYSIS Strength • • Wide array of next-gen TVs, smartphones and electronic devices Strong reputation Weakness • High price in comparison with average income per capita in Vietnam • • • Effective management Low cost productions Huge capital amount Opportunity • • • Market demand in Vietnam is growing by the increase of income level The good relationship between Vietnam and Korea in economic cooperation, investment and culture Consumer behaviour of Vietnamese customer • • Threat • • • Depends on third parties’ software for products Distribution channels costs for products Apple still is a strong brand in Vietnam in high-end class smartphone Chinese top companies in smartphone manufacturing enter market by with same products but lower price Decline in demand for TVs B PEST ANALYSIS Political Economical One of the most stable politic system and security countries in South East Asia (World Bank, 2016) The governance effectiveness is approximate the region’s average rate (52 to 53) (World Bank, 2016) Vietnamese government implement the integration and liberalised market economy policies Aim to attract the flows of capital, technology and knowledge by the investment of foreign companies into Vietnam -> Foreign investors will have supports from government’s policies Corporate tax was decreased at 3% to 22% from 2013 to 2014 and kept stable to the next year (KPMG, 2016) Lower than China which has 25% from 2010-2015 and even Korea with 24.2% annually on corporate tax (KPMG, 2016) Due to the volume of investment, Samsung has the most favoured term for 50 years, exempt for years, 5% for next 12 years, 10% for last 34 years as well as import tariffs and VAT (Samsung, 2014) Increase rapidly since 2010, rd in average annual GDP growth rate after China and India (Lehmann, 2010) GNI per capita (PPP) in 2015: $5,690 (World Bank, 2016) Inflation rate in 2015: 0.6% (lowest from 2005) (World Bank, 2016) Vietnam is recovery after the global economic recession in 2008 Vietnam is the major member of ASEAN since 1997 Vietnam and South Korea have FTA since 12/2015 South Korea stands at top in FDI in Vietnam ($1.2 billion) (General Statistic Office, 2014) Vietnam is member of TPP since 02/2016 Demand for high-end class smartphone and electronic devices is rising -> the strong reputation of Samsung can be utilised in competitive strategy (Lev-Ram, 2013) Population: 94,348,835 (CIA World Factbook 2015) Young population pyramid: 78% population is under 40 years old (CIA World Factbook 2015) Consumer expenditure in Vietnam raised from $6,627 to $8,835 during 2010-2015 (World Bank, 2016) Vietnamese consumer’s behaviour is changing with more spending on Social modern retail outlets due to convenience and health-related issues (Cho et al, 2014) Due to the invasion of Korean pop-culture, the young Vietnamese people easily accept South Korean’s brands, especially the state of the art products such as smartphones (Cho et al, 2014) Number of internet users: 48.3/100 people (World Bank, 2016) Vietnam ranked top 10 in telephone-mobile cellular with 136 million (CIA World Factbook, 2015) The budget for R&D in 2012 was $653 million (0.27% GDP), lower than other countries in the region (China: 1.97%, Thailand: 0.3%, Malaysia: 1.13%, Singapore: 2.2%) (World Bank, 2014) Technological Technology level is low due to the inefficiency in using R&D budget Auxiliary industries are still at the doorstep of growing stage and slowly increase, not meet the demand for manufacturers such as Samsung (Pham, 2012) Infrastructure in Vietnam is developing at a fast pace to attract FDI Road and sea line infrastructure is well-developed C SAMSUNG’S FORCES ANALYSIS Porter’s five forces of industrial competition Source: Porter, M E (1986) Competition in Global Industries Boston: Harvard Business School Press Competitive rivalry Due to the potential segmentation and the stable growth of Vietnamese’s electronic equipment market, especially smartphone market, it is doubtless that Samsung have to compete with numbers of rivalry The main competitors of Samsung in consumer electronics market are Sony, LG, Toshiba and Panasonic However, for each product lines, Samsung have to face different rivals, but even though, Samsung is gradually asserted their top one rank in overall Vietnamese market TV market in Vietnam, 2014 Source: https://www.dionlinesurvey.com/en/2015/11/03/tv-market-in-vietnam/ Study from market research firm Dream Incubator (2015) showed that, Samsung have been leading position in the domestic TV market with sales accounting for 30.2% of market share Sony, major competitors of Samsung came in runner-up position with nearly 26% LG, despite being the second position and stick to Samsung in the global market but in the Vietnamese market, they has just ranked the third position with a market share of 14% Besides, this market research has also shown that, more than 85% of Vietnamese customers choose the Samsung-branded TV model due to its high-quality of display, especially the 40 inches series and larger series Dream Incubator’s study also pointed out that the trend of Vietnamese customers is changing gradually to high-end class TV with several modern features In the smartphone segmentation, report from IDC (2015) figured out that, Samsung and Apple were the most popular smartphone brands in Vietnam in 2015 Totally, Samsung accounted for 35.6% of market share in Q2 of 2015 while iPhone took 24% of market share to become the second highest level of revenue Even though Apple dropped 11% of revenue from 2014, IDC pointed out that demand for Apple products was not falling due to the purchasing in grey market is not took into account the revenue of Apple Threat of new entrants Overall, SEV has generally low level of the threat of new entrants in Vietnam Electronics industry in Vietnam is a large-scale industry with high-tech requirements and strong budget Moreover, the consumer’s behaviour in Vietnam is based on trust and reputation rather than advertisements (Cho et al, 2014) All these things create a very high barrier to entry for new companies established However, according to IDC (2015), Samsung is leading brand in high-end class smartphones but they have left the mid and low-end segment open to smartphone producers to entry, especially top Chinese smartphone enterprises such as Oppo, Xiaomi as well as Microsoft (Nokia) and ASUS The new entrants quickly entered the mid-end market by new products with reasonable price, fashionable appearances and the same functions with Samsung’ This may be one threat to Samsung when the new entrants plan to take the market share of high-end class Threat of substitute products Electronic industry is very diversity With the rapid development of technology, people can use tablet, smartphone or laptop instead of TV for entertainment Conversely, the handheld devices can be substituted by another one with similar functions but more suitable and affordable However, SEV has diversified its products to include any products that could potentially replace each other, so Samsung can expand their business lines and minimise the threat of new entrants Bargaining power of buyers This is one of the highest impacts to Samsung due to the competition fiercely occur in industry, and customers can easily switch to new products if the competitor’s promotional messages are strong enough (Macintosh & Lockshin, 1997) Because there are numbers of the brand in Vietnam, especially new entrants, Vietnamese buyers have several options in electronic industries As mentioned above, Vietnamese prefer the modern and class new products, so if Samsung cannot maintain their reputation and their innovative product development, they can lose their customer’s loyalty Bargaining power of supplier Currently, due to their size of business, any company in Vietnam is totally ready to be Samsung’s supplier and mostly Samsung’s product components is imported from China branch, so the bargaining power of Vietnamese suppliers is inconsiderable However, Samsung is the largest smartphone producer using Android OS from Google and they have saved million dollars in developing their own OS like Apple, consequently, Samsung heavily depends on Google Samsung has to customise Android OS to fit with their design and hardware Moreover, when Google released an update for the new OS, Samsung must test it first before implant to the system This process affects Samsung when they have to develop their products to fit with Google new version of Android; therefore, weaken the efforts of Samsung to differentiate its product Furthermore, with the increasing in the Android-based smartphone, the Samsung’s products have a few differentiations with other competitors, except the design and hardware features D SAMSUNG COMPETITIVE STRATEGY AND RECOMMENDATION Generic strategies Sources: Source: Porter, M E (1986) Competition in Global Industries Boston: Harvard Business School Press According to Porter (1986), a company tend to serve a broad target market by providing different products and services with higher quality should follow the differentiation strategy in competition SEV use their competitive advantages in a wide array of high-quality products to serve Vietnam market with nearly 78% of the population in the working age The differential and quality of a product are based on its added value (Capon, 2009) Samsung electronics products are well-known by its high-quality in comparison with the competitors The figure below showed the most popular brands in Vietnam TV market in 2014, Samsung and Sony are the two most well-known brands which had more than 80% overall score for each company TV market in Vietnam, 2014 Source: https://www.dionlinesurvey.com/en/2015/11/03/tv-market-in-vietnam/ As mentioned above in bargaining power of buyers, Vietnamese customer is willing to pay the extra price for additional features or quality as well as the image that help them be more fashionable or the reputation of the products that they purchased which improved their image in public This is a useful source for Samsung competitive strategy to utilise their advantages and strong reputation to earn a higher profit for the added-value However, we recommend to Samsung when using the differentiation-based strategy, they should ensure that the customer’s perception of the company and the offerings not changes or they have to face the downturn in profits and brand reputation Furthermore, rather than selling a product with its original accessories, Samsung can expand and provide a full set of accessories with customisable options for clients, such as the flagship smartphone Galaxy S7 Edge with other accessories of wireless charge, high-quality cover, high-quality earphone,… to increase the added value and help customers be more comfortable when they not need to buy extra accessories for their uses SAMSUNG VIETNAM ORGANISATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS III A ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE Samsung Vietnam organisational structure Source: Samsung Electronic Half Year Report, 2014 SEV adopted a divisional structure because they have individual product lines which are TV, mobile devices, home appliances, IT, memory/storage According to Capon (2009), a company which used divisional structure is decentralised and have a wide and diverse array of products and services to spread and reduce the risk of loss by numbers of business activities This advantage is suitable for a large-scale multinational corporation like Samsung to operate business simultaneously in different product lines Furthermore, this organisational structure also requires the manager of each division must have short-term and medium-term decision-making power as well as responsibility to solves the business-level strategy and allow the CEO and board of directors can focus on the long-term plan and corporate strategy for the whole company (Capon, 2009) However, because of depending on division managers to operate the company in middle-level of strategy, a good communication and working relationship must create between the division managers and board of directors This will help the company can link together the short, medium and long-term decision-making to push the company can forward in the same direction (Capon, 2009) Adopting this structure also help SEV can empower for each division to be profit centres themselves, having to manage the budget and meet the profit target within a fixed budget from head office It increases the performance of each division because they have to satisfy the performance requirements and meet the financial target to catch the eyes of the board of directors and have a better position in the allocation of company’s resources (Capon, 2009) B ORGANISATION CULTURE Handy (1976), summarised in Leatherbarrow et al (2014), the divisional structure is mirrored by the role culture and proved by numbers of top 500 hundred companies as Samsung is one of them The role culture is that work is controlled by the rules and regulations, by the role and job description rather than the person who the job In Samsung, because of their size and nature of operations, Samsung has implemented the regulations and institutions which promoted the important of the job and position that be empowered to avoid the possible corruption of people who have the power of that position (Samsung Code of Conduct, 2006) Deal and Kennedy’s organisational cultures Source: Deal T E and Kennedy, A A (1982) Corporate Cultures: The Rites and Rituals of Corporate Life, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books, 1982; Furthermore, based on the model of Deal and Kennedy (1982), Samsung have the work hard/play hard cultures because their products and services are mass producing and failing to sell a single item does not affect considerably the overall performance of the company Quick feedback on performance is another advantage of this culture If the sales staffs have achieved the target whether or not, the division manager can easily to modify the sales strategy and enhance it if the previous does not meet the requirement C HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Because Samsung’s advantages are based on their innovation in product development and effective management, Samsung has invested to R&D and systematic education to prepare skilful human resources for their R&D, Marketing and Management sectors in the future Besides their own system, Samsung Vietnam has developed the cooperation with Vietnamese universities to develop their global professional human resources The education system of Samsung Electronics Source: http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/envi ronmentsocialreport_ReeducationAndJobTraining.html For three major sectors above, Samsung has three major training centres for each sector which are leadership development centre for leading and spreading the change, Samsung Institute of Global Marketing that develop the human resources for Marketing and Samsung Advanced Technology Training Institute that develop the professional engineering human power(Samsung, 2016) Leadership development centre carries out a leadership training program for each level of staff to solve the diversity culture throughout the company Samsung Institute of Global Marketing develop marketing education course to incorporate the company philosophy into marketing strategy while Samsung Advanced Technology Training Institute carries out “the education with the specialisation such as high-end technology, core technology, basic (foundation) technology and R&D technology education” (Samsung, 2016) Personal evaluation system of Samsung Electronics Source: http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/envi ronmentsocialreport_ReeducationAndJobTraining.html Besides the training system, Samsung has also issued the personal evaluation system which takes place annually to evaluate the performance of the employee as well as their growth possibility This system provides important data for HR managers to utilise efficiently and appropriate the employee capabilities Conversely, under the fair evaluation, employees will be motivated in career development to achieve better performance result, and through that, a win-win situation for both employee and Samsung D RECOMMENDATION The divisional structure has its potential difficulties which related to the distribution of resources, coordination among divisions and cost of operating simultaneous product lines (Capon, 2009) Because resources of a company are limited, each division vies for their largest distribution of company resources and possibly conflict with other division From the conflict of allocating company resources, the coordination among division will be negatively affected while diverse ranges of division also increase the demand of wide communication in Samsung It also cost the running individual division quite high if there are duplications of key activities such as HR department for each division (Capon, 2009) Due to the structure of SEV, they should centralise the core activities and central policies of the company to make it economic and practical sense For example, SEV can organise one central HRM, Finance or Legal department to develop and maintain one policy for the whole company and every division should follow the central policy It helps Samsung can reduce the risk of not only wasteful duplication of effort but also avoid the diluting company culture and management as well as increase the transparency and financial health of Samsung IV CONCLUSION The paper has analysed and evaluated the strategic choices as well as the organisational effectiveness of Samsung Vietnam on several dimension This paper has suggested some opinions which Samsung could choose to improve their business performance By keeping the core value of Samsung and adapt suitable strategy to develop, Samsung Vietnam will achieve higher success not only in Vietnam but also the global market of electronics products Word count: 2199 References BURCHELL, M and ROBIN, J (2011) The great workplace San Francisco: Jossey-Bass CAPON, C and CAPON, C (2009) Understanding the business environment Harlow, England: Prentice Hall/Financial Times CHO, J., CHING, G and LUONG, T (2014) Impulse buying behavior of Vietnamese consumers in supermarket setting IJRSM, 3(2) CIA (2016) The World Factbook [online] Available at: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/vm.html [Accessed Jul 2016] DREAM INCUBATOR (2016) TV market in Vietnam | DI Marketing Online [online] Available at: https://www.di-onlinesurvey.com/en/2015/11/03/tv-market-in-vietnam/ [Accessed Jul 2016] GENERAL STATISTIC OFFICE (2016) General Statistics 2014 Of Vietnam [online] Available at: http://www.gso.gov.vn/default_en.aspx?tabid=515&idmid=5&ItemID=15197 [Accessed Jul 2016] IDC (2016) Vietnam Smartphones Increase by 57% in 2014, Heats Up by Budget Models, Says IDC [online] Available at: http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp? containerId=prVN25480615 [Accessed Jul 2016] KOVACH, S (2016) How Samsung Went From A Dried Fish Exporter To One Of The Top Names In Tech [online] Business Insider Available at: http://www.businessinsider.com/history-of-samsung-2013-2?op=1 [Accessed Jul 2016] KPMG (2016) Corporate tax rates table | KPMG | GLOBAL [online] Available at: https://home.kpmg.com/xx/en/home/services/tax/tax-tools-and-resources/tax-ratesonline/corporate-tax-rates-table.html [Accessed Jul 2016] LEATHERBARROW, C., FLETCHER, J and CURRIE, D (2010) Introduction to human resource management London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development LEV-RAM, M (2013) Samsung’s road to global domination [online] Fortune Available at: http://fortune.com/2013/01/22/samsungs-road-to-global-domination/ [Accessed Jul 2016] MACINTOSH, G, & LOCKSHIN, L S (1997) Retail relationships and store loyalty: a multilevel perspective International Journal of Research in marketing, 14(5), pp487-497 PHAM TRUONG, H (2012) Supporting industries for machinery sector in Vietnam 1st ed [online] Institute of Developing Economies - Japan External Trade Organization Available at: http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Download/Brc/pdf/02_ch5.pdf [Accessed Jul 2016] PORTER, M E (1986) Competition in Global Industries Boston: Harvard Business School Press SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS (2006) 1st ed Global Code of Conduct [online] Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Available at: http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/corporateprofile/download/sec_global_cod eofconduct.pdf [Accessed Jul 2016] SAMSUNG (2007) Samsung Electronics Environmental & Social Report Seoul: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd SAMSUNG (2016) About SAMSUNG - SAMSUNG [online] Available at: http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/e nvironmentsocialreport_ForIdealWorkplace.html [Accessed Jul 2016] SAMSUNG (2016) Enviroment Social Report [online] Available at: http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/e nvironmentsocialreport_ForIdealWorkplace.html [Accessed Jul 2016] THE GUARDIAN (2014) Samsung promises to compensate factory workers who suffered cancer [online] Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/may/14/samsung-compensate-factoryworkers-cancer [Accessed Jul 2016] WORLD BANK (2016) GNI per capita, PPP (current international $) | Data [online] Available at: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GNP.PCAP.PP.CD? end=2015&locations=VN&start=2000 [Accessed Jul 2016] WORLD BANK (2016) Internet users (per 100 people) | Data [online] Available at: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IT.NET.USER.P2?locations=VN [Accessed Jul 2016] WORLD BANK (2016) PPP conversion factor, private consumption (LCU per international $) | Data [online] Available at: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/PA.NUS.PRVT.PP? end=2015&locations=VN&start=2000 [Accessed Jul 2016] WORLD BANK (2016) Research and development expenditure (% of GDP) | Data [online] Available at: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/GB.XPD.RSDV.GD.ZS?locations=VN-CNTH-MY-SG [Accessed Jul 2016] WORLD BANK (2016) Worldwide Governance Indicators [online] Available at: http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.aspx#reports [Accessed Jul 2016] [...]... SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS (2006) 1st ed Global Code of Conduct [online] Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Available at: http://www .samsung. com/us/aboutsamsung/corporateprofile/download/sec_global_cod eofconduct.pdf [Accessed 3 Jul 2016] SAMSUNG (2007) Samsung Electronics Environmental & Social Report Seoul: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd SAMSUNG (2016) About SAMSUNG - SAMSUNG [online] Available at: http://www .samsung. com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/e... develop and maintain one policy for the whole company and every division should follow the central policy It helps Samsung can reduce the risk of not only wasteful duplication of effort but also avoid the diluting company culture and management as well as increase the transparency and financial health of Samsung IV CONCLUSION The paper has analysed and evaluated the strategic choices as well as the organisational. .. person who do the job In Samsung, because of their size and nature of operations, Samsung has implemented the regulations and institutions which promoted the important of the job and position that be empowered to avoid the possible corruption of people who have the power of that position (Samsung Code of Conduct, 2006) Deal and Kennedy’s organisational cultures Source: Deal T E and Kennedy, A A (1982)... while Samsung Advanced Technology Training Institute carries out “the education with the specialisation such as high-end technology, core technology, basic (foundation) technology and R&D technology education” (Samsung, 2016) Personal evaluation system of Samsung Electronics Source: http://www .samsung. com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/envi ronmentsocialreport_ReeducationAndJobTraining.html... sales strategy and enhance it if the previous does not meet the requirement C HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Because Samsung s advantages are based on their innovation in product development and effective management, Samsung has invested to R&D and systematic education to prepare skilful human resources for their R&D, Marketing and Management sectors in the future Besides their own system, Samsung Vietnam... organisational effectiveness of Samsung Vietnam on several dimension This paper has suggested some opinions which Samsung could choose to improve their business performance By keeping the core value of Samsung and adapt suitable strategy to develop, Samsung Vietnam will achieve higher success not only in Vietnam but also the global market of electronics products Word count: 2199 References BURCHELL, M and ROBIN,... human resources The education system of Samsung Electronics Source: http://www .samsung. com/us/aboutsamsung/corpcitizenship/environmentsocialreport/envi ronmentsocialreport_ReeducationAndJobTraining.html For three major sectors above, Samsung has three major training centres for each sector which are leadership development centre for leading and spreading the change, Samsung Institute of Global Marketing... directors and have a better position in the allocation of company’s resources (Capon, 2009) B ORGANISATION CULTURE Handy (1976), summarised in Leatherbarrow et al (2014), the divisional structure is mirrored by the role culture and proved by numbers of top 500 hundred companies as Samsung is one of them The role culture is that work is controlled by the rules and regulations, by the role and job description... result, and through that, a win-win situation for both employee and Samsung D RECOMMENDATION The divisional structure has its potential difficulties which related to the distribution of resources, coordination among divisions and cost of operating simultaneous product lines (Capon, 2009) Because resources of a company are limited, each division vies for their largest distribution of company resources and. .. LEATHERBARROW, C., FLETCHER, J and CURRIE, D (2010) Introduction to human resource management London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development LEV-RAM, M (2013) Samsung s road to global domination [online] Fortune Available at: http://fortune.com/2013/01/22/samsungs-road-to-global-domination/ [Accessed 2 Jul 2016] MACINTOSH, G, & LOCKSHIN, L S (1997) Retail relationships and store loyalty: a multilevel
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