Philosophy

Introduction of An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind

Introduction of An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind
... philosophical analysis of the concept of seeing: but each will have more credibility to the extent that it is consistent with the other METAPHYSICS AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF MIND The philosophy of mind is not ... what they say about this Secondly, if they mean to abandon reasoned argument altogether, even in defence of their own position, then I have Introduction nothing more to say to them because they ... embrace any kind of sensation, perception or thought This agreed, we can say that the philosophy of mind is the philosophical study of subjects of experience – what they are, how they can exist, and...
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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Mental content

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Mental content
... issues to with mental content: the causal relevance of mental content, the individuation of mental content, and the origin of mental content With regard to the first issue, we found no easy way to ... following How the contents of mental states contribute to the causal explanation of behaviour? Can the contents of mental states be assigned to them independently of the environmental circumstances in ... 1975) 82 An introduction to the philosophy of mind content of John’s belief that snow is white It would be wrong for us – and wrong for John – to say that the inhabitants of the distant planet believe...
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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Mental states

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Mental states
... an account of our concepts of mental states than as a theory of the nature of mental states themselves 52 An introduction to the philosophy of mind ing an adequate account of the character of ... An introduction to the philosophy of mind suitable pattern of causal relationships, as may the states of a bundle of human neurones, or the states of a piece of computing machinery, or even the ... terms of their rela- Mental states 47 tions to the computer’s ‘inputs’, other software states of the computer, and the computer’s ‘outputs’ By a ‘software’ state of a computer, I mean, for instance,...
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An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Perception

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind - Perception
... colour and shape of the tree and of the house, the intervening ground between them, the sky behind them, and other objects in their vicinity (together with their colours and shapes) And these other ... front of a house, the ‘that’-clause provides 134 An introduction to the philosophy of mind an exhaustive specification of the propositional content of his perceptual judgement and thus an exhaustive ... content of an experience related to its qualitative character? This is an extremely dif- 136 An introduction to the philosophy of mind ficult question to answer We can, however, begin to get a...
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Williams on Greek Literature and Philosophy

Williams on Greek Literature and Philosophy
... reasoning (Williams has no quarrel with these ideas) but its taking reason to operate distinctively and normatively only when it has full charge of the self and controls non-rational desires Williams ... GUILT, AND “HETERONOMY” Chapters and of Shame and Necessity, “Recognising Responsibility” and “Shame and Autonomy,” are the most successful parts of Williams book, as reviewers have noted, and ... exercised by what one has done, and not merely by what one has intentionally done.”48 With great sensitivity and perceptiveness Williams asks us to respond to the “manifest grandeur” of these...
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The revolution in philosophy (I) - human spontaneity and the natural order

The revolution in philosophy (I) - human spontaneity and the natural order
... See Kant and the Capacity to Judge, p  (I): Human spontaneity and the natural order  equally boldly that behind all human experience was the necessity of human spontaneity in generating that ... and the revolution in philosophy representation of the object and the object represented) thereby requires first of all that the intuitive multiplicity be combined in such a way that the distinction ... know nothing of things -in- themselves, it also asserted  According to Beatrice Longuenesse, we should therefore conceive of the understanding as a rulegiver for the syntheses of the imagination...
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The revolution in philosophy (II) - autonomy and the moral order

The revolution in philosophy (II) - autonomy and the moral order
... agents) and the notion of respecting the inherent “dignity” of all agents (treating people as ends -in- themselves and willing from the standpoint of the “kingdom of ends”) gave Kant, so he thought, the ... point in all his writings on moral philosophy, and particularly in both the Critique of Practical Reason and the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals In the Groundwork, Kant claims that the ... Kant and the revolution in philosophy Kant thought the key to answering these questions lay in the practical necessity for assuming that we are free The independence of the normative from the...
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The revolution in philosophy (III) - aesthetic taste, teleology, and the world order

The revolution in philosophy (III) - aesthetic taste, teleology, and the world order
... (III): Aesthetic taste, teleology, and the world order  to the same things Something like the “kingdom of ends” thus seems to be at play in aesthetic judgment, except that the “kingdom of ends” involves ... “beautiful”) to a particular instance, but rather perceiving the instance as beautiful and, as it were, (III): Aesthetic taste, teleology, and the world order  searching for a concept under which ... (III): Aesthetic taste, teleology, and the world order  In that way, aesthetic experience combines elements of both spontaneity and passivity: one must have the unconstrained harmony between intellect...
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Coming to terms with the past in postwar literature and philosophy

Coming to terms with the past in postwar literature and philosophy
... at your past and see someone who is a stranger in terms of ideology and beliefs, then this coming to terms with your own past is simultaneously a coming to terms with the German past The significance ... relentless in pushing the process towards completion The rapidly achieved unification seemed to bring closure to postwar efforts to come to terms with the National Socialist past The initial act of the ... developments in the East Indeed, on the issue of coming to terms with the past West and East Germany diverged radically While many in the West tended to identify National Socialism with a more encompassing...
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Criticism and experience - philosophy and literature in the German Enlightenment

Criticism and experience - philosophy and literature in the German Enlightenment
... this theory is grounded on the one hand in the principle of self-determination of each monad (and therefore of each individual human being) and on the other in the positing of a telos toward which ... ); Eighteenth-century German authors and their Philosophy and literature in the German Enlightenment               aesthetic theories: Literature and the other arts, ed ... philosophy, the education of Philosophy and literature in the German Enlightenment  children, the science of medicine and the mechanical arts Above all, ‘we must think out a way of healing the intellect...
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Introduction - German literature and philosophy

Introduction - German literature and philosophy
... chapter ‘Two realisms: German literature and philosophy –’, finds that the unfolding dialogue of philosophy and Introduction: German literature and philosophy literature fails to confirm ... consists, as McCarthy shows, in the use of literature and philosophy alike as the ‘epistemic tools’ (p ) of a grand, Introduction: German literature and philosophy  fundamentally anthropocentric project: ... rebarbative, difficult art and abandonment of the liberal humanistic tradition is the only way forward for the aesthetic recovery of the subject Introduction: German literature and philosophy  Robert...
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